2006

Shakespeare's Birthday

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.1068  Thursday, 30 November 2006

From:         John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         Wednesday, 29 Nov 2006 13:55:29 -0000
Subject: 17.1062 Shakespeare's Birthday
Comment:     Re: SHK 17.1062 Shakespeare's Birthday

Joseph Egert wrote:

 >E.I.Fripp may have been another Schoenbaum source. In an archived
 >NOTES AND QUERIES (1921) piece, Fripp describes St. Mark's Day as
 >"one of the unlucky days of the Calendar known as Black Crosses, when
 >a few years previously, crosses and altars were draped and a special
 >litany was said."--one of the risks being a fairy kidnapper.

Yes, sorry - the author of the note I cited in SHK 17.1059 ("Among the 
Shakespeare Archives: the birth of William Shakespeare",  Notes and 
Queries, No. 154 (12th series, vol. 8), 26 March 1921, pages 241-242.) 
was not, of course, Robert Whatley (I misread the contents list) and was 
indeed most likely to be Edgar I. Fripp, the usual author of the series, 
although he is not named in the contents list, and I can't see page 242 
to check!

John Briggs

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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
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New Shakespeare Search Engine Launches

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.1067  Thursday, 30 November 2006

From:         Jeremy Ehrlich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         Thursday, 30 Nov 2006 10:08:08 -0500
Subject: 17.1058 New Shakespeare Search Engine Launches
Comment:     Subject: SHK 17.1058 New Shakespeare Search Engine Launches

Just to clarify:

The Folger Shakespeare Library E-News item that Philip Weller mentions 
announcing the launch of the "Clusty" search engine was simply meant as 
an announcement to our readers that the site had been launched.  The 
Folger was not involved in the creation of the site, nor are we involved 
in its hosting or upkeep.
 
Sorry for any confusion!

-Jeremy

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Dying Unshriven

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.1065  Thursday, 30 November 2006

From:         Louis Swilley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         Wednesday, 29 Nov 2006 16:40:21 -0600
Subject:     Hamlet - yet once more

An old friend and I were today discussing "Hamlet" for the umpteenth 
time. One of the points introduced made me aware for the first time 
(shame!) of the three repetitions of the idea of one dying unshriven. 
The Ghost protests that he was so served by Claudius; later, Hamlet 
backs off from killing Claudius because he prefers to catch him in an 
unshriven state,  "kicking his heels at heaven"; this is followed his 
ugly treatment of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern whom he sends to their 
death "no shriving time allowed." (It would appear that Hamlet's conduct 
in these last two events is expressly against the logical extension of 
the Ghost's restraining remark to Hamlet about Gertrude, "Leave her to 
heaven.")
 
Then what is to be made of Hamlet's calm attitude on his return to 
Elsinore - after the butchering of R. and G., (about which, by the way, 
Horatio is horrified.)
 
Then the whole play shows Hamlet trying to bring Claudius to justice for 
the murder of his father, yet it is not that issue, but Claudius' 
successful plot against the prince's life that destroys him. This is in 
the public order. I suppose we may say that, by this means, Claudius' 
crime is one against the state, rather than the object of personal 
revenge. It would be seriously irresponsible of a prince to act out of 
personal revenge rather than for correction of the public order.
 
Comments?
 
L. Swilley

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Licensing and Public Domain

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.1066  Thursday, 30 November 2006

From:         Sean B. Palmer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         Wednesday, 29 Nov 2006 17:16:27 +0000
Subject: 17.1061 Licensing and Public Domain
Comment:     Re: SHK 17.1061 Licensing and Public Domain

Michael Best wrote:

 >There are, however, some arguments in favour of making scholarly texts
 >available in the public domain, and we will certainly be discussing these
 >alternatives as the site matures further.

I understand the inherent tension between the effort in preparing the 
works on the one hand and making them available to the public domain on 
the other. You might want to consider one of the funding sources buying 
works into the public domain. Jimmy Wales announced the possibility of 
one just last month:

  http://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Talk:Copyright_wishlist
  http://mail.wikipedia.org/pipermail/wikipedia-l/2006-October/045481.html

I'm not sure how this would interact with the ISE being a non-profit 
organisation, but I'd assume and hope that if one were to bill only for 
the time and expertise of the editors it would come within the 
non-profit realm.

Note also that the digital scans of the quartos, first folio, and 
sonnets are already in the public domain in the United States, as far as 
I understand the following:

  "Bridgeman Art Library v. Corel Corp., 36 F.Supp.2d 191
  (S.D.N.Y. 1999), was a decision by the United States
  District Court for the Southern District of New York,
  which ruled that exact photographic copies of public
  domain images could not be protected by copyright
  because the copies lack originality"

  
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bridgeman_Art_Library_Ltd._v._Corel_Corporation

At any rate, as I mentioned in my previous message, even were the ISE 
original spelling works to be released to the public domain, I think 
it's both polite and good academic practice for people to clearly 
reference where they found them; especially given the amount and quality 
of the work that's obviously gone into them.

Doing so would also avoid dissuading others from making similar items of 
historic value public domain works in the future, of course, so there 
are knock-on ramifications to such politeness.

Kindest regards,
Sean B. Palmer
http://inamidst.com/sbp/

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
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Guardians of the Theatre Museum

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.1064  Thursday, 30 November 2006

From:         Stuart Hampton-Reeves <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         Thursday, 30 Nov 2006 00:45:01 +0000
Subject:     Guardians of the Theatre Museum

With apologies for cross-posting, I copy below an email from Ian Herbert 
of the Society for Theatre Research, which is campaigning to save the 
Theatre Museum in Covent Garden. There is more information about the 
closure and the campaign at www.theatremuseumguardians.org.uk. I am sure 
that this will be of interest to many SHAKSPERians.

Stuart Hampton-Reeves

(from Ian Herbert)

Our website is now up and running at www.theatremuseumguardians.org.uk 
-please visit. Then tell your students, your friends, your relatives, 
your flower arranging group - anybody - to visit too. See below for 
details, but there's even more on the site. The Guardians are officially 
supported by SCUDD - now we need that confirmed by your participation.

Thanks
Ian Herbert
Society for Theatre Research

The Guardians of the Theatre Museum need your help.

Who are they?

Well, this is what we said in today's Press Release:

Leading lights of the theatre world have sent an uncompromising message 
to Government and museum authorities: The Theatre Museum must not be 
destroyed. Sir Alan Ayckbourn, Simon Callow, Dame Judi Dench, Sir Peter 
Hall, Sir David Hare, Sir Derek Jacobi, Sir Eddie Kulukundis, Sir 
Cameron Mackintosh, Lord  Rix and Sir Donald Sinden and many others, 
with the support of major representative theatre organisations, have 
formed the Guardians of the Theatre Museum.  Their aim is to prevent the 
museum's Covent Garden site being closed and the Collection being 
absorbed by the Victoria and Albert Museum.

What do they want?

* Short Term: to ask the Victoria and Albert Museum to withdraw its 
notice of closure on the Theatre Museum's Russell Street site, in order 
that alternative proposals for its future may be coolly examined.

* Medium Term: To look for better ways of managing the Theatre Museum 
and supporting its funding.

* Long Term: To investigate broader possibilities for properly housing 
what the V&A describe as 'the largest collections in the world for the 
UK's performing arts'.

The Russell Street site is due to close to the public on 7 January 2007, 
which leaves very little time to put pressure on the V&A to rescind 
their decision. If it does close, the public will not have access to its 
exhibits for at least two and probably five years.  Further, the huge 
potential of the site as a cultural focus in Olympic Year 2012 will have 
been thrown away.

The Guardians plan to enroll as many members of the theatre professions 
and the theatregoing public as possible, as quickly as possible.  
Membership is of course free - all that is needed is enough voices.

The aim is to have 100,000 Guardians by Christmas

Said a Guardians spokesperson, 'Our supporting organisations already 
account for tens of thousands of people. If we can mobilise the 
theatregoing public, this target can be reached very easily. The V & A, 
and their masters the DCMS, have suggested that no one cares about the 
Theatre Museum. We care about it passionately, and we can prove that we 
are not alone.' Sir Derek Jacobi added, 'I deplore the closure of the 
Russell Street premises as an act of cultural vandalism.'

Act Now: join us at www.theatremuseumguardians.org.uk -  and tell everyone!

The Guardians are convened by the Save London's Theatres Campaign and 
the Society for Theatre Research.  They are supported by The Actors' 
Centre, The Association of British Theatre Technicians, The Association 
of Lighting Designers, The Association of Personal Managers, BECTU, The  
British Music Hall Society, The British Puppet and Model Theatre Guild, 
The Critics' Circle, Equity, The  International Association of Theatre 
Critics, The International Federation for Theatre Research, The 
International Society of Libraries and Museums of the Performing Arts, 
The Irving Society, The Mander and Mitchenson Theatre Collection, The 
Musicians' Union, The National Campaign for the Arts,  The Noel Coward 
Foundation, The  Noel Coward Society, The Puppet Centre Trust, St Paul's 
Covent Garden (The Actors' Church), The Society of British Theatre 
Designers, The Stage Management Association, The Standing Committee of 
University Drama Departments and The Theatres Trust.

Principal Lecturer in English and Drama
University of Central Lancashire
www.britishshakespeare.ws
www.uclan.ac.uk/shakespeare

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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