2006

Licensing and Public Domain

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.1047  Friday, 24 November 2006

From: 		Ron Severdia <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Friday, 24 Nov 2006 09:42:11 -0800
Subject: 	Licensing and Public Domain

I've been having a lot of ongoing conversations with various Shakespeare 
fans about where the line is drawn with regards to licensing. Almost a 
year ago, some fellow thespians/scholars & I started PlayShakespeare.com 
with the intent of it being a free resource for the works of Shakespeare, 
as well as a source (and discussion grounds) focused on the productions of 
his plays (ideas, concepts, etc.). There are a number of other free 
versions online, but we're in the process of editing our own version of 
the texts to provide a more modern and better-quality alternative to 
existing options.

People tend to favor the GNU GPL for it's openness and freedom of usage: 
http://www.gnu.org/licenses/fdl.html

I prefer the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share-Alike 
License here: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/

The main difference between the two is the GNU GPL gives anyone the right 
to print the texts off of the page, compile and edition and sell it. The 
CC license restricts this, but allows freedom to do whatever you want as 
long as you maintain the same kind of licensing.  Personally, I have a 
problem allowing someone else to make a profit off of something (even if 
it's $1) that was founded to be free for everyone. So the questions at 
hand are:

1) In the opinion of the people on this list, which is the best type of 
license to use? (Even another option I didn't mention)

2) What's your opinion on the quality of texts currently available online 
and free? Is there one particular site that stands out? Why?

Thank you!

Ron Severdia
PlayShakespeare.com

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor 
assumes no responsibility for them.

U.S. Copyright Office Issues New Rights

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.1046  Friday, 24 November 2006

From: 		Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		23 Nov 2006 06:09:31 -0800
Subject: 	U.S. Copyright Office Issues New Rights

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20061122/ap_on_hi_te/digital_copyright

Cell Phone Reuse Among New Rights Issued
By ANICK JESDANUN,
AP Internet Writer
Wed. Nov 22, 5:34 PM ET

Cell phone owners can now break locks to use their handsets with competing 
carriers, while film professors have the right to copy snippets from DVDs 
for educational compilations, the U.S. Copyright Office said Wednesday.

Other rights declared in the government's triennial review of the 1998 
Digital Millennium Copyright Act seek to improve access for the blind and 
to obsolete works and let security researchers try to break 
copy-protection technologies embedded in CDs

All told, Librarian of Congress James H. Billington approved six 
exemptions, the most his Copyright Office has ever granted. For the first 
time, the office gave an exemption to a group of users. Previously, 
Billington took an all-or-nothing approach, making them difficult to 
justify.

"I am very encouraged by the fact that the Copyright Office is willing to 
recognize exemptions for archivists, cell phone recyclers and computer 
security experts," said Fred von Lohmann, an attorney with the 
civil-liberties group Electronic Frontier Foundation. "Frankly I'm 
surprised and pleased they were granted."

But he said he was disappointed the Copyright Office rejected a number of 
exemptions that could have benefited consumers, including one that would 
let owners of DVDs legally copy movies for use on Apple Computer Inc.'s 
iPod and other music players.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor 
assumes no responsibility for them.

Borrowers and Lenders

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.1044  Friday, 24 November 2006

From: 		Sujata Iyengar <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 22 Nov 2006 22:49:12 -0500
Subject: 	B&L 2.1 / Call for Papers for 4.1, Shakespeare and Actors 
of Color

The Editors of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and 
Appropriation are delighted to announce the launch of issue 2.1, 
Shakespeare for Children, at http://www.borrowers.uga.edu (click the 
"Current Issue" button on the left-hand menu bar, or go directly to the 
Table of Contents at 
http://atropos.english.uga.edu/cocoon/borrowers/current_index).

Borrowers and Lenders is a peer-reviewed, online, multimedia Shakespeare 
journal that was launched in 2005. The journal appears biannually, with a 
special issue in the Spring/Summer and general issue in the Fall/Winter. 
B&L is indexed in the MLA Bibliography, World Shakespeare Bibliograpy, and 
other databases, and belongs to the CELJ. For readers' convenience, we 
provide .pdf versions of the text of our articles, although copyright and 
technical restrictions compel us to display multimedia (pictures, film 
clips, sound clips, PowerPoint presentations, maps, etc.) online only. Our 
archive is available at 
http://atropos.english.uga.edu/cocoon/borrowers/archive .

Issue 2.1 (Spring/Summer 2006) is a special issue, Shakespeare for 
Children. It includes Sheila Cavanagh on cognition and crushes in Romeo 
and Juliet for children; Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak and Agata Zarzycka on 
Shakespearean Live-Action Role-Playing Games; Darlene Ciraulo and Daniel 
Schierenbeck on fraternal and sororal education in the Lambs' Tales from 
Shakespeare and Poetry for Children; Angela Keam on "Shakesteen" movies 
and the star-body of Claire Danes; Erica Hateley on the mermaid/Miranda 
metaphor in children's literature; and reviews of the Folger's exhibition 
on Shakespeare for Children and Georgia Shakespeare's "Boot Camp 
Shakespeare" for preschoolers. This issue also includes a special review 
cluster, edited by Alice Dailey, on Quinnopolis vs. Hamlet at the 2006 
Shakespeare Association of America, and reviews of books on Shakespeare 
and Appropriation.

Calls for Papers

The editors of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and 
Appropriation welcome original scholarship engaging with the afterlives of 
Shakespearean texts and their literary, filmic, multimedia, and critical 
histories. We encourage contributors to use the online format to its best 
advantage, in particular, by imagining how to enhance, illustrate, or 
extend their essays with multimedia (screen captures, sound clips, images, 
and so on).

Currently we solicit essays, book reviews, accounts of Appropriation in 
Performance, essay-clusters, and new discoveries for upcoming general and 
special issues. Future special issues include Canadian Shakespeares (2007, 
guest editor Daniel Fischlin), and Shakespeare and Actors of Color (2008, 
guest editor Ayanna Thompson). We welcome suggestions for themes for 
special issues.

We accept submissions for general issues year-round, and are also 
currently accepting essays for our upcoming special issue, Shakespeare and 
Actors of Color, B&L 4.1 (Spring/Summer 2008), guest-edited by Ayanna 
Thompson, Arizona State University. This special edition of Borrowers and 
Lenders seeks to examine the use of actors of color in contemporary 
Shakespeare productions. We welcome essays that address such questions as: 
How does Shakespeare's cultural capital inform the desire to employ actors 
of color in modern productions? How do Shakespearean productions 
complicate and/or ameliorate anxieties about the significance of race 
vis--vis color in performance? Is there a relationship between the 
employment of actors of color and the desire to adapt Shakespeare's plays 
politically, culturally, and/or socially? Please send essays by electronic 
mail to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by May 1, 2007.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor 
assumes no responsibility for them.

"Shakespeare Behind Bars" on TV

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.1045  Friday, 24 November 2006

From: 		Patty Winter <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 22 Nov 2006 19:36:29 -0800
Subject: 	"Shakespeare Behind Bars" on TV

The documentary "Shakespeare Behind Bars" will premiere on The Movie 
Network in Canada this Friday (Nov. 24) at 9:00 p.m. ET, with repeat 
showings on Dec. 5 (two airings), Dec. 13, and Dec.  17. See www.tmn.ca 
for schedule details.

(Oftentimes, Movie Central in western Canada has the same premieres as TMN 
in the east, but I don't see any sign of this movie on MC's schedule.)

The movie's website is www.shakespearebehindbars.com.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor 
assumes no responsibility for them.

Russian 'Twelfth Night

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.1043  Wednesday, 22 November 2006

[1] 	From: 	Nora Kreimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
 	Date: 	Tuesday, 21 Nov 2006 22:05:02 -0300
 	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.1035 Russian 'Twelfth Night'

[2] 	From: 	Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
 	Date: 	Wednesday, 22 Nov 2006 07:10:41 -0500 (EST)
 	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.1035 Russian 'Twelfth Night'


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Nora Kreimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, 21 Nov 2006 22:05:02 -0300
Subject: 17.1035 Russian 'Twelfth Night'
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.1035 Russian 'Twelfth Night'

>Well, yes, my mistake--sort of. Being a translator, I misunderstood what
>Nora Kreimer meant by "original"--somewhat mistakenly herself, she used
>the word to signify a translation of Shakespeare's text into Spanish that
>was used in the sur- or super-titles. The Russian production, of course,
>employs a version in Russian. But it "ain't Shakespeare" either, right?
>
>Best,
>Alfredo Michel Modenessi

Yes, my apologies. It was a Spanish script. You're right! I was somewhat 
mistaken...

Nora Kreimer

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Jack Heller
  <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 22 Nov 2006 07:10:41 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 17.1035 Russian 'Twelfth Night'
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.1035 Russian 'Twelfth Night'

>From Terence Hawkes:

>Access from Shakespeare's intense
>height can make all culture's kin.  Just wait till he gets to
>Afghanistan.
>Has anybody ever suggested there was anything political in all this?

Earlier this year, within the cover story of an international issue of 
Time magazine was a photo of a performance of Love's Labour's Lost in 
Kabul. No waiting necessary.

Jack Heller

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor 
assumes no responsibility for them.

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