2006

Roderigo's Fate

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0950  Wednesday, 25 October 2006

[1] 	From: 	Mario DiCesare <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Monday, 23 Oct 2006 16:49:13 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0939 Roderigo's Fate

[2] 	From: 	William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Monday, 23 Oct 2006 17:03:30 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0939 Roderigo's Fate

[3] 	From: 	John Savage <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Monday, 23 Oct 2006 17:40:16 -0400 (GMT-04:00)
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0939 Roderigo's Fate

[4] 	From: 	Joseph Egert <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Tuesday, 24 Oct 2006 17:53:36 +0000
	Subj: 	RE: SHK 17.0924 Roderigo's Fate


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Mario DiCesare <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Monday, 23 Oct 2006 16:49:13 -0400
Subject: 17.0939 Roderigo's Fate
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0939 Roderigo's Fate

Dear Colleagues,

The protestations regarding John Savage's statement about the non-death 
of Roderigo miss the mark. The phrasing -- "Roderigo pops up, alive, in 
V.ii" -- is not perfectly clear, but in fact there is a clear (and 
troubling) reference to Roderigo's being alive in Cassio's lines, "and 
even now he spake / (After long seeming dead) Iago hurt him, / Iago set 
him on." (V.ii.327-29). Indeed, there are several troubling references 
here; the playwright seems in a hurry to get to Othello's closing speech.

Mario A. Di Cesare

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Monday, 23 Oct 2006 17:03:30 -0400
Subject: 17.0939 Roderigo's Fate
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0939 Roderigo's Fate

I realize that this will be of little help, but I had the same problem 
some many years ago. I can't remember the source, but I was led to 
believe that Roderigo came back to life after Iago stabbed him. I read 
and reread 5.2 to no avail. Perhaps John Savage will provide us with the 
source for this mistaken resurrection.

Bill

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		John Savage <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Monday, 23 Oct 2006 17:40:16 -0400 (GMT-04:00)
Subject: 17.0939 Roderigo's Fate
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0939 Roderigo's Fate

 >Where does he (Roderigo) pop up alive in V.ii?  Nigel Davies

Cassio: "And even but now he spake (after long seeming dead), Iago hurt 
him, Iago set him on."  V.ii.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Joseph Egert <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, 24 Oct 2006 17:53:36 +0000
Subject: 17.0924 Roderigo's Fate
Comment: 	RE: SHK 17.0924 Roderigo's Fate

John Savage asks:

 >Dear SHAKSPER-type persons: Please explain this to me. We know
 >Roderigo is dead by the end of the play. Iago told us (tho he might
 >well be lying) and Lodovico also told us (he would not be lying).
 >But Roderigo pops up, alive, in V.ii, even though it would seem that
 >the rule of tragedy should have had him done away with by the end of
 >the play. Please explain.

Here are the relevant quotes from Honigmann's Arden edition of OTHELLO:

(5.1.61-2)       IAGO: O murd'rous slave! O villain!  [Stabs Roderigo]

(5.1.101-2)     IAGO: He that lies slain here, Cassio,/ Was my dear friend.

(5.1.114)        IAGO: ...and Roderigo dead.

(5.2.105)        EMILIA: O my good lord, yonder's foul murders done!

(5.2.110-2)    EMILIA: Cassio, my lord, hath killed/ A young Venetian 
called Roderigo.

                  OTHELLO: Roderigo killed?

(5.2.305-6) LODOVICO: ...Here's a letter/ Found in the pocket of the 
slain Roderigo...

(5.2.325-7) CASSIO: ...and even but now he spake,/ After long seeming 
dead, Iago hurt him,/ Iago set him on.

  Iago, the master of deceit, is here hoisted with his own 
petard--himself the victim of a "judgment maimed and most imperfect," as 
are all the judgments in a play which asks whether we can ever truly 
know anything or anyone. The confusion was Willfully sown by Iago's creator.

Joe Egert

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Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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The Demise of the Coward

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0949  Wednesday, 25 October 2006

From: 		Sam Small <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, 24 Oct 2006 16:58:10 +0100
Subject: 17.0938 The Demise of the Coward
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0938 The Demise of the Coward

There were three strange replies to my quest to discover the modern 
coward. To John Kennedy I would say that Hardy might be interested in 
the search. Edmund Taft seems facetiously cowardly and Bob Lapides 
confuses inaction and lack of conviction with cowardice.  In any case 
supporting the grossly corrupt Green industry is a matter of opinion and 
not of courage.  Inversely those people who would refuse to fight in a 
war actually display courage in the face of certain derision.

What I was looking for was the Shakespearean coward.  That rotten fellow 
who sees that a good thing should be done by him but is not prepared to 
take the personal risk in doing it.  The reason he does not do it is 
because he trembles with fear at the harm that may come to him. 
Certainly in Shakespeare it would be permissible for this fellow to be 
attacked at will. Someone beyond the pale.  If today we admire courage - 
why don't we dislike cowardice?

SAM SMALL

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Bush & Bard

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0946  Wednesday, 25 October 2006

From: 		Al Magary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Monday, 23 Oct 2006 23:44:32 -0700
Subject: 17.0750 Bush & Bard
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0750 Bush & Bard

 >The President, in answering an NBC correspondent's question about the
 >report that he had been reading Camus' The Stranger, said, "And I also
 >read three Shakespeares." He mentioned no play titles but went on to
 >explain, "I've got an ek-a-lec-tic reading list."
 >Video at
 >http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2006/08/30/video-bush-explains-his-_n_28367.html

A late follow-up to this.  I followed a link at Slate (in the 
hilariously headlined "The Bookworm: The trouble with George Bush is he 
reads too much") and found the titles to two of the plays:  Hamlet and 
Macbeth.  The rest of the list released by the White House is at 
http://www.booktv.org/misc/081706_bush.asp

Cheers,
Al Magary

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

The Archbishop Wasn't There? So Forth.

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0948  Wednesday, 25 October 2006

From: 		Andrew Wilson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Monday, 23 Oct 2006 19:13:37 -0700
Subject: 17.0923 The Archbishop Wasn't There? So Forth.
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0923 The Archbishop Wasn't There? So Forth.

The Archbishop cites two instances where the throne of France descended 
through the female.  The first, King Pepin, deposed the rightful lineal 
heir Childeric:

        King Pepin, which deposed Childeric,
        Did as heir general, being descended
        Of Blithild, which was daughter to King Clothair,
        Make claim and title to the crown of France.

The second, Hugh Capet, usurped the crown from the rightful lineal heir 
Charles the Duke of Lorraine:

        Hugh Capet also, who usurped the crown
        Of Charles the Duke of Lorraine, sole heir male
        Of the true line and stock of Charles the Great ...

It is easy to skip over those two words "deposed" and "usurped".

The only two examples the Archbishop cites to justify Henry V's upcoming 
war for the throne of France, are cases where the rightful, sitting 
monarch was ousted.  These are not cases where the last legitimate male 
monarch has recently died and the next legitimate heir happens to be a 
woman or her male descendant.  The Archbishop doesn't dare cite examples 
where the crown of France could have descended via a female but didn't 
because the custom in France has always been to follow exclusively male 
lines.

The Archbishop's real message seems to be "So you want to grab the 
throne by force, and claim your rightful descent via your great, great 
grandmother.  Well, there is a precedent for that sort of thing."

Andrew Wilson

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Cincinnati Shakespeare Company's Macbeth

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0945  Wednsday, 25 October 2006

From: 		William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Monday, 23 Oct 2006 15:40:15 -0400
Subject: 	Cincinnati Shakespeare Company's Macbeth

The Cincinnati Shakespeare Company's Macbeth opened on October 19 and 
will close on November 19. Shows are at 7:30 Thursdays-Saturdays, and 
Sundays at 2PM. For tickets and information, call 513-381-BARD. The 
stage is lined with skulls -- perfect for Halloween. The costuming is 
primitive; the weird sisters are orgasmic, and Hecate is present with 
white horns. It runs for about two hours, with a break.

Bill Godshalk

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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