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Home :: Archive :: 2006 :: September ::
Who's this critic?
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0795  Friday, 15 September 2006

[1] 	From: 	William Godshalk <
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	Date: 	Thursday, 14 Sep 2006 18:53:34 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0790 Who's this critic? Hamlet

[2] 	From: 	Arthur Lindley <
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	Date: 	Friday, 15 Sep 2006 08:00:10 +0000
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0790 Who's this critic?


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		William Godshalk <
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Date: 		Thursday, 14 Sep 2006 18:53:34 -0400
Subject: 17.0790 Who's this critic? Hamlet
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0790 Who's this critic? Hamlet

Some many years ago, I read a book on Hamlet. Yes, believe it or not, I 
did. But I took no notes and the name of the author evades me. But its 
distinguishing chapter is an elaborate reconstruction of the ur-Hamlet 
based on Q1 and the German Hamlet. I realize that this description is 
far from definitive, but can anyone give me a (decent) suggestion?

Bill

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Arthur Lindley <
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Date: 		Friday, 15 Sep 2006 08:00:10 +0000
Subject: 17.0790 Who's this critic?
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0790 Who's this critic?

I can't say that I've ever found Iago's 'damn'd in a fair wife' puzzling 
or in need of emendation, though intelligent people like John Briggs and 
Barbara Everett apparently do.  You are damned in a fair wife, I assume, 
because (a) her attractiveness will provoke anxiety or jealousy, and (b) 
because a fair wife is in a position to be more demanding than a plain 
one.  For the latter sense, see Steffi Graf's response to a fan who 
yelled 'marry me': 'I don't think you can afford it'.  The former sense 
is, of course, directly applicable to Othello. Both senses are 
deplorably sexist, but, then, consider the source.

Arthur Lindley

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