2006

RSC Appeal to Educators

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0820  Wednesday, 20 September 2006

[1] 	From: 	Hannibal Hamlin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Tuesday, 19 Sep 2006 14:23:18 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0808 RSC Appeal to Educators

[2] 	From: 	Anne Cuneo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Wednesday, 20 Sep 2006 14:38:35 +0200
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0808 RSC Appeal to Educators


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Hannibal Hamlin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, 19 Sep 2006 14:23:18 -0400
Subject: 17.0808 RSC Appeal to Educators
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0808 RSC Appeal to Educators

I agree with the comments of Terence Hawkes and Peter Holland, but I'd 
add some further criticisms of the RSC appeal.  The comment about 
studying "scripts on a page" ignores the ongoing rich critical debate 
about the relative status of plays as performed and as printed.  The 
growing consensus seems to be that both are legitimate, and that 
Shakespeare seems to have written (perhaps at different times and in 
different ways) with both in mind.  Is the RSC really saying that a live 
performance is the only legitimate experience of Shakespeare?  Millions 
of readers can attest that the plays are powerful on the page as well as 
the stage (indeed some-from Bradley to Bloom-would argue they are more 
so).  Furthermore, the RSC attitude seems arrogant and self-centered.  I 
would love to be able to take my students to see the RSC regularly, but 
since I teach in North-Central Ohio, this would be rather difficult. 
Furthermore, though there are options for live performances within reach 
in Ohio, I wouldn't recommend these indiscriminately.  Many of my 
students have never seen a live play, but I've taken a few classes to 
see what turned out to be awful productions, and even the least 
experienced students could see they were terrible.  But that's about all 
they could see.  Bad theater can perhaps be instructive, but only if you 
have something good to measure it against.  If all that is available is 
a bad production, I'd much rather my students stuck to reading the 
plays.  Bad productions just turn them off theater, and the sort of 
delusional and self-aggrandizing productions Terence Hawkes no doubt has 
in mind only serve to confuse them and convince them that Shakespeare on 
his own terms is boring and out of date.

Hannibal Hamlin

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Anne Cuneo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 20 Sep 2006 14:38:35 +0200
Subject: 17.0808 RSC Appeal to Educators
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0808 RSC Appeal to Educators

I have hesitated on the thread this belongs to: Teaching English to ELS 
students? RSC Appeal to Educators? Well, I choose one.

I would like to share an experience which is just now coming to 
completion, and which I think might be of some interest.

Two years ago, I was asked by a group of people who live in a rather 
remote valley of French Switzerland, the Joux Valley, to help them put 
up a show around Shakespeare. They wanted to bring Shakespeare to the 
people of their valley: they are peasants, shepherds, watchmakers, civil 
servants in their small villages, primary teachers, etc, people 
generally speaking who don't dwell in literature, as a rule. The valley 
is covered in snow most of the winter, and relatively isolated, and 
these people had been putting up shows for several years. They had 
tackled Tchekov, Brecht, Moli


RSC Appeal to Educators

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0819  Wednesday, 20 September 2006

[1] 	From: 	Hannibal Hamlin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Tuesday, 19 Sep 2006 14:23:18 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0808 RSC Appeal to Educators

[2] 	From: 	Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Tuesday, 19 Sep 2006 15:16:15 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0810 Teaching Shakespeare to ESL Students

[3] 	From: 	Alex Carney <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Tuesday, 19 Sep 2006 19:42:34 EDT
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0810 Teaching Shakespeare to ESL Students


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Hannibal Hamlin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, 19 Sep 2006 14:23:18 -0400
Subject: 17.0808 RSC Appeal to Educators
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0808 RSC Appeal to Educators

I agree with the comments of Terence Hawkes and Peter Holland, but I'd 
add some further criticisms of the RSC appeal.  The comment about 
studying "scripts on a page" ignores the ongoing rich critical debate 
about the relative status of plays as performed and as printed.  The 
growing consensus seems to be that both are legitimate, and that 
Shakespeare seems to have written (perhaps at different times and in 
different ways) with both in mind.  Is the RSC really saying that a live 
performance is the only legitimate experience of Shakespeare?  Millions 
of readers can attest that the plays are powerful on the page as well as 
the stage (indeed some-from Bradley to Bloom-would argue they are more 
so).  Furthermore, the RSC attitude seems arrogant and self-centered.  I 
would love to be able to take my students to see the RSC regularly, but 
since I teach in North-Central Ohio, this would be rather difficult. 
Furthermore, though there are options for live performances within reach 
in Ohio, I wouldn't recommend these indiscriminately.  Many of my 
students have never seen a live play, but I've taken a few classes to 
see what turned out to be awful productions, and even the least 
experienced students could see they were terrible.  But that's about all 
they could see.  Bad theater can perhaps be instructive, but only if you 
have something good to measure it against.  If all that is available is 
a bad production, I'd much rather my students stuck to reading the 
plays.  Bad productions just turn them off theater, and the sort of 
delusional and self-aggrandizing productions Terence Hawkes no doubt has 
in mind only serve to confuse them and convince them that Shakespeare on 
his own terms is boring and out of date.

Hannibal Hamlin

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, 19 Sep 2006 15:16:15 -0400
Subject: 17.0810 Teaching Shakespeare to ESL Students
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0810 Teaching Shakespeare to ESL Students

Lysbeth,

I've re-read all of the posts in this thread and haven't seen anyone 
suggesting that one use story adaptations *instead* of the original 
text. In my own post, I suggested that story versions can be used a 
stepping stone to assist students along the way, not as a way of 
avoiding language altogether.  The stories help students deal with 
issues such as plot and getting the characters straight, so by the time 
you get to the language they aren't as intimidated by it.  And what's 
more, the use of story versions helps them reinforce their modern 
English reading skills, so there's a two-tier benefit to working this way.

I hope that clarifies things a bit.

Tanya Gough
The Poor Yorick Shakespeare Catalogue
www.bardcentral.com

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Alex Carney <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, 19 Sep 2006 19:42:34 EDT
Subject: 17.0810 Teaching Shakespeare to ESL Students
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0810 Teaching Shakespeare to ESL Students

Is there any literature on this topic?  I'd like to pass it on to the 
ESL teachers in the high school I teach in.

Alex Carney

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare Outside of England/English

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0817  Wednesday, 20 September 2006

From: 		H.J. Helmers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, 19 Sep 2006 15:44:21 +0200
Subject: Shakespeare Outside of England/English
Comment: 	SHK 17.0798 Shakespeare Outside of England/English

Indeed, the question is an old one, but it has been largely ignored by 
modern scholars. Though performances by English strolling players, which 
toured the continent regularly from 1585 onwards, inspired several Dutch 
and German adaptations in the early seventeenth century - the most 
famous example being Jan Vos's Dutch incredibly popular adaptation of 
Titus Andronicus (w. 1638, p. 1642) - the first Shakespeare translation 
proper was written by the Dutch actor Abraham Sybant, who translated The 
Taming of the Shrew for performance on the Amsterdam Theatre. His Dolle 
Bruyloft (Mad Wedding) was published in 1654. In contrast, the first 
translation of Shakespeare's poetry was written as early as 1621 Dutch 
version Venus and Adonis, perhaps reflecting the fact that the plays 
were for a long time not considered to be worth the effort.  For more 
information on the subject of strolling players and early Shakespeare 
translations, see for example Anston Bosman's wonderful 'Renaissance 
Intertheatre and the Staging of Nobody' ELH 71:3 (2004), 559-585; Annie 
van Nassau-Sarolea, 'Abraham Sybant: strolling player and first 
Shakespeare translator'.  Theatre Research 13 (1974), 38-59 and Ton 
Hoenselaars (ed.), Shakespeare and the Language of Translation (London, 
Thomson Learning, 2004). A very useful starting point on the internet is 
http://pages.unibas.ch/shine/, a website devoted to Shakespeare in 
translation. I am currently preparing a dissertation on the Dutch 
reception of English drama in the seventeenth century, which will, 
however, take at least another four years to complete.

Best,
Helmer Helmers
Leiden University
The Netherlands

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Burbage's Wife

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0818  Wednesday, 20 September 2006

From: 		Anne Cuneo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 20 Sep 2006 10:44:47 +0200
Subject: 17.0806 Burbage's Wife
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0806 Burbage's Wife

Thank you to every one of you who gave me Ellen's name, plus lots of 
details about her. You saved my life - or rather my writer's honour, so 
to speak...

I hope it is not deemed too feminist to remark on the many books and 
texts who speak of her (and other women of that time) as Brayne's 
sister, James' Burbage wife, or James's widow, without ever giving her a 
real personal identity.

Thanks, anyway.

Anne Cuneo

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

The Opera Hamlet in Kansas City

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0816  Wednesday, 20 September 2006

From: 		Michael Luskin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, 19 Sep 2006 14:20:52 EDT
Subject: 	The Opera Hamlet in Kansas City

The Lyric Opera Company of Kansas City, one of the country's premier 
regional opera companies, invites you to its production of Hamlet, by 
Ambroise Thomas, November 4 through November 12.

The opera, very popular a hundred years ago, is enjoying a vigorous 
revival, being performed more and more often in Europe and the United 
States.

The libretto was written by Michel Carre and Jules Barbier, who wrote 
the libretti for Gounod's Faust and Romeo et Juliette, as well as 
Offenbach's Tales of Hoffmann.  This production is directed and designed 
by Thaddeus Strassberger, first prize winner in the 2005 European Opera 
Directing Competition.

The opera has several highlights.  The closet scene is very memorable, 
and Verdi, no stranger to Shakespeare, complimented it lavishly. 
Ophelia's mad scene rivals Lucia di Lammermoor's.  The music is lush 
nineteenth century French throughout.

The opera requires a rich baritone for the role of Hamlet, a fine 
coloratura for Ophelia, and a resonant bass-baritone for Claudius. 
Franco Pomponi has recently done Hamlet in Barcelona, and has performed 
worldwide, from Moscow to Los Angeles.  Lauren Skuce, singing Ophelia, 
debuted with the company in Mozart's Marriage of Figaro last year. 
Kevin Short, singing Claudius, has had great success with Mozart roles.

The Opera Company is offering a special opera weekend.  The schedule is:

Friday, November 3:     arrival any time, check in at the Downtown 

                                Kansas City Marriott Hotel.

             8:00 PM, the Prazak String Quartet at the Folly Theater

Saturday, November 4:   9:00 AM, complimentary breakfast at the hotel

free time to explore Kansas City;  highly recommended, The Nelson-Atkins 
of Art, in particular its outdoor sculpture garden; the Truman Library 
and house in nearby Independence, MO; the Steamship Arabia, a recently 
excavated steamship which sank in 1856; the Kansas City Jazz Museum; and 
the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum.  Enjoy great barbeque while in the 
city!

             8:00 PM.  Opening Night performance of Hamlet at the Lyric
Theater, with complimentary wine in the members lounge during intermission

Sunday: 9:00 AM, complimentary breakfast

             12:00 PM check out

The price for ALL this is $160 per person, double occupancy.  Send your 
check, payable to Lyric Opera of Kansas City, c/o Lisa Sicola, 5633 
Cherry Street, Kansas City, MO 64110.

For further information, call Virginia Long at 816 471 4933, or email 
her at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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