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Home :: Archive :: 2007 :: February ::
Unknown Play
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0085  Friday, 2 February 2007

[1] 	From: 	Frank Whigham <
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	Date: 	Thursday, 1 Feb 2007 12:17:17 -0600
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0076 Unknown Play

[2] 	From: 	Alan Dessen <
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	Date: 	Thursday, 1 Feb 2007 14:10:16 -0500 (EST)
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0076 Unknown Play

[3] 	From: 	William Godshalk <
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	Date: 	Thursday, 01 Feb 2007 14:50:57 -0500
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0076 Unknown Play

[4] 	From: 	Matthew Steggle <
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	Date: 	Friday, 2 Feb 2007 08:46:37 -0000
	Subj: 	Unknown play


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Frank Whigham <
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Date: 		Thursday, 1 Feb 2007 12:17:17 -0600
Subject: 18.0076 Unknown Play
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0076 Unknown Play

It means a joke or stab (a "bourd"), what Puttenham might call a "privy 
nip," is no joke if it's a true statement.

 >"sooth boord is no boord"

Frank Whigham

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Alan Dessen <
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Date: 		Thursday, 1 Feb 2007 14:10:16 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 18.0076 Unknown Play
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0076 Unknown Play

In response to Tom Reedy's question #1, a London comedy entitled *The 
Play of the Cards* is not extant. Variations on this configuration do 
survive in dialogue (e.g., in Wilson's *The Three Ladies of London*) or 
other comments (as when Richard Lichfield notes that Thomas Nashe while 
at Cambridge played "The Varlet of Clubs"); in *A Knack to Know a Knave* 
(1592?) Honesty uncovers vice in four knaves (a priest, a farmer, a 
courtier, and a coneycatcher). In 1582 the Children of the Chapel Royal 
performed for Queen Elizabeth "A Comedy or Morall devised on a game of 
the Cards," but this item is likely not the London comedy cited by 
Harington. As late as 1626 one of Jonson's "gossips" in *The Staple of 
News* refers to the moral play Vice who might appear "in a Juggler's 
jerkin, with false skirts, like the Knave of Clubs."  However, the 
knaves or varlets of the card deck do not appear in any extant moral play.

For documentation of these items, see my note in *Modern Language 
Review* 62 (1967): 584-5.

Alan Dessen

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		William Godshalk <
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Date: 		Thursday, 01 Feb 2007 14:50:57 -0500
Subject: 18.0076 Unknown Play
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0076 Unknown Play

A Dictionary of Lowland Scotch:

<http://search.netscape.com/ns/boomframe.jsp?query=sooth+boord&page=1&offset=0&result_url=redir%3Fsrc%3Dwebsearch%26requestId%3Da6303aa2fd8123ce%26clickedItemRank%3D11%26userQuery%3Dsooth%2Bboord%26clickedItemURN%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fbooks.google.com%252Fbooks%253Fid%253DFckRAAAAIAAJ%2526pg%253DRA4-PA205%2526lpg%253DRA4-PA205%2526dq%253Dsooth%252Bboord%2526source%253Dweb%2526ots%253D2xG-Wh1qrJ%2526sig%253DX1gzKQVUSR5LQzOSATrQ1kw66NY%26invocationType%3D-%26fromPage%3DNSCPToolbarNS%26amp%3BampTest%3D1&remove_url=http%3A%2F%2Fbooks.google.com%2Fbooks%253Fid%253DFckRAAAAIAAJ%2526pg%253DRA4-PA205%2526lpg%253DRA4-PA205%2526dq%253Dsooth%252Bboord%2526source%253Dweb%2526ots%253D2xG-Wh1qrJ%2526sig%253DX1gzKQVUSR5LQzOSATrQ1kw66NY>

In Scottish, sooth is used as an adjective, and signifies " true." A 
sooth boord is nae boord ie, a jest with too much truth in it may be no 
jest at all). ...

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Matthew Steggle <
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Date: 		Friday, 2 Feb 2007 08:46:37 -0000
Subject: 	Unknown play

"Sooth boord is no boord" - "boord" is Oxford English Dictionary, bourd 
n., a joke or merriment.  In other words, the phrase means "A joke that 
tells the truth isn't a joke".  It's a proverbial phrase - OED sooth a. 
2b quotes a sixteenth-century example of the phrase from John Heywood.

- Matt

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