2007

Renaissance Tragedy

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0149  Thursday, 15 February 2007

From: 		Carol Barton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, 13 Feb 2007 12:56:20 -0500
Subject: 18.0140 Renaissance Tragedy
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0140 Renaissance Tragedy

Not at all, Hannibal . . . not at all! Even the term "Puritan" (writ 
large or small) is a vexed one, as any historian of the period will 
readily tell you-and especially as a Miltonist, one grows sensitive to 
the kind of (mis)labeling that destroys a man's career (as, for example, 
the label "antimonarchist" has done from the 18th century until very 
recently, in terms of Milton's prose). Electronic communication is a 
wonderful thing, but the 'Net does have a way of turning casual 
utterances (or statements out of context) into "fact" (such as one 
academic talk show participant's recent silly comment that "Shakespeare 
stole everything he wrote"-serious Shakespeare scholars would know 
immediately that she was revealing her own ignorance of standard 
practice from the classical period through the Enlightenment, but how 
many students heard that remark, and now point out the Bard's 
"plagiarism"-her term, too-to their professors when they get caught 
doing "the same"?)

Like you, I was trying to convey the real magnitude of the question: one 
can no more pronounce "tragedy" dead (in either the literal or the 
literary sense) than he or she can pronounce "Shakespeare" dead, without 
extensive qualification. The original query wasn't specific enough to 
invite a sensible response, for that reason.

Thank you for your kind reply!

Carol Barton

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
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Atone

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0148  Thursday, 15 February 2007

From: 		Stephanie Kydd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, 13 Feb 2007 09:09:10 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 18.0120 Atone
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0120 Atone

 >I have long been struck by Shakespeare's use of the word "atone", which
 >strikes me as pun on "make one" and "propitiate" in a religious sense.

I would say Dennis Taylor is correct in his conjecture that Shakespeare 
plays on these two senses of "atone".  The word "one" was originally 
pronounced without the "w" and was near in sound to the modern word 
"own", not "won".  This pronunciation of "one" survived into the late 
17th century and survives today in such words as "atone", "alone", and 
"only".

Elizabethan pronunciation of the vowel in "one" was somewhere between 
the modern "own" and "on".  Shakespeare rhymes "one" with "on" and 
"gone", as well as "lone" and "bone", and plays on "want one", "wanton" 
in TN III.i. (see Helge Kokeritz: "Shakespeare's Pronunciation", pp. 
132, 229-235, 492).  Shakespeare similarly plays on "alone" / "all one" 
in AYLI I.i., where Charles the Wrestler threatens to inflict such 
injury on Orlando that he will neither go "alone" (by himself) or "all 
one" (in one piece).

 >Yet in the Chadwyck Bible data base, I find the following:
 >Tyndale, Bible, 2 Cor 5 (1530-34): "praye we you in Christes
 >stede / that ye be atone with God."  This seems to have some
 >evocation of the later "atone"; should the OED list it as a first
 >citation?

In literal early use "atone" meant to be "at one" or commune with God. 
The Tyndale quotation uses "atone" in this sense.  Modern 
spelling/pronunciation of this passage would be "that ye be at one [WON] 
with God".  The secondary sense of "propitiate" derives from this 
earlier sense.

The OED, although excellent, is not without its shortcomings.  In dating 
"atone" (v) to 1593 and "atone" (n) to 1595, the OED is probably off by 
at least six-to-eight years.  The words "attonement" and "attonemaking" 
appear in Thomas Thomas' 1587 Latin/English dictionary meaning 
"agreement" and "agreement, or consent" respectively (q.v. "Gratia", 
"Conciliatio") - and doubtless these words derive from the already 
extant usage of a verb "atone" meaning "set at accord".  However, the 
OED's strict rules of citation permit no latitude for similar words.  If 
the word in question is "atone", OED will not cite an earlier usage of 
"atonement".  The same word used as a different part of speech, as well 
as earlier usage of a compound word used in the same sense but spelled 
as two separate words, will be similarly excluded.

- Stephie Kydd

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
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editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Ian Richardson Dies

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0146  Thursday, 15 February 2007

[1] 	From: 	Arthur Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Tuesday, 13 Feb 2007 18:37:00 +0000
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0141 Ian Richardson Dies

[2] 	From: 	David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Tuesday, 13 Feb 2007 16:50:56 -0500
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0141 Ian Richardson Dies

[3] 	From: 	Mary Rosenberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Wednesday, 14 Feb 2007 10:58:16 -0800
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0141 Ian Richardson Dies


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Arthur Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, 13 Feb 2007 18:37:00 +0000
Subject: 18.0141 Ian Richardson Dies
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0141 Ian Richardson Dies

Until shortly before his death, Ian Richardson was appearing in the 
National Theatre's production of *The Alchemist,* giving a sly and 
inventive reading of Sir Epicure Mammon as a kind of pedant of gluttony, 
lecturing the other characters on the particularly revolting delicacies 
required by a taste as delicate as his.  I'm glad I had a chance to see 
it.  Better to remember a distinguished career that way than the way CNN 
did.  They headlined his obituary "Actor in Mustard Ad Dies."  Grey 
Poupon has a lot to answer for.  So does Ted Turner.

Regards,
Arthur

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, 13 Feb 2007 16:50:56 -0500
Subject: 18.0141 Ian Richardson Dies
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0141 Ian Richardson Dies

My memory is of Richardson, early in his career (1962), as Edmund in the 
Peter Brook *King Lear* (from which the movie developed); he is still 
vivid in my mind's eye, sitting on the apron of the Shubert Theater 
stage in Boston, swinging his legs and making us all deeply complicit in 
his schemes. Pretty vivid exit, too-dragged off the otherwise empty 
stage by his brother, feet first, arms trailing, while the lights slowly 
dimmed for the first time in the performance, and the only sound was the 
shhh----shhh---shhh of his garments on the floor.

David Evett

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Mary Rosenberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 14 Feb 2007 10:58:16 -0800
Subject: 18.0141 Ian Richardson Dies
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0141 Ian Richardson Dies

I, too, regret the passing of Ian Richardson. During my years as a young 
theatre-goer at Stratford, I was always impressed by his tremendous 
stage presence. Although physically slight, he could command a stage 
simply by standing still. Every gesture was well-judged and meaningful, 
never fussy or fidgety. He was always noticeable without seeking to draw 
attention to himself. He was also cherished among the local people who 
used to talk of seeing him carrying his shopping bag out of the 
supermarket at weekends just like "one of us." He was a fine actor and 
will be greatly missed.

Mary Rosenberg

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

A Rave Review for "Slings and Arrows"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0147  Thursday, 15 February 2007

From: 		Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, 13 Feb 2007 12:01:10 -0500
Subject: 18.0138 A Rave Review for "Slings and Arrows"
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0138 A Rave Review for "Slings and Arrows"

Just a bit more info on Slings and Arrows:

The series is not so loosely based on the Stratford Festival.  Many of 
the actors in the series have performed here in Stratford, and Stephen 
Ouimette's Oliver Welles, the Burbage Artistic Director, is a very 
thinly veiled "homage" to Stratford's own Richard Monette.  Paul Gross 
played Hamlet here a few years back, and his wife Martha Burns grew up 
here and performed at the festival several times before going to Toronto 
to help found the Soulpepper Theatre.

The first season features Hamlet, the second Macbeth and this, the 
current and final season, takes on King Lear.  Stratford mainstay 
William Hutt, whose 1996 Stratford Lear is part of the reason I now live 
here, is doing the Lear.  I'm told that this will be the end of the 
series, having covered the three stages of man - youth, maturity and old 
age.  One can only hope they will continue, though Hutt has come out of 
retirement so many times now, he reminds me of Basil Rathbone's 
Macbeth-quoting death in Comedy of Terrors.

We currently have both the first and second season available for sale. 
If you'd like to be notified when the third season is released on DVD, 
drop me a line off list and I'd be happy to add you to our notification 
list.

Cheers,
Tanya Gough
The Poor Yorick Shakespeare Catalogue
www.bardcentral.com

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare Behind Bars Award Nomination

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0145  Thursday, 15 February 2007

From: 		This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Date: 		Wednesday, 14 Feb 2007 23:06:28 EST
Subject: 	Shakespeare Behind Bars Nominated 2007 Beliefnet Film Award

Gentles,

Philomath Film's award winning documentary, Shakespeare Behind Bars, has 
been nominated for the 2007 Belief Film Award for Best Spiritual 
Documentary.

All of us connected with SBB are honored for this nomination.

You can vote for SBB by visiting the link below:

Click Here: Check out "Your Vote Counts: 2007 Beliefnet Film Award 
Nominations"

Please spread the word amongst your family and friends.

Thank you for your support.

Blessings,
Curt L. Tofteland

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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