2007

Understanding Antony

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0088  Friday, 2 February 2007

[1] 	From: 	Michael Luskin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 1 Feb 2007 14:26:24 EST
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0082 Understanding Antony

[2] 	From: 	William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 01 Feb 2007 15:23:20 -0500
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0082 Understanding Antony

[3] 	From: 	Cary Dean Barney <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 1 Feb 2007 23:01:26 +0100
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0082 Understanding Antony


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Michael Luskin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 1 Feb 2007 14:26:24 EST
Subject: 18.0082 Understanding Antony
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0082 Understanding Antony

 >I think we tend to misapply contemporary ideals to Shakespeare and his
 >perception of historical figures, including Julius Caesar. In
 >particular, I think we forget the assumed and acknowledged greatness of
 >Caesar against which Shakespeare shows the "pompous and power-greedy"
 >private man.

Isn't this, in a nutshell, what the whole roundtable discussion is about?

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 01 Feb 2007 15:23:20 -0500
Subject: 18.0082 Understanding Antony
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0082 Understanding Antony

Don Bloom writes: "I think we tend to misapply contemporary ideals to 
Shakespeare and his perception of historical figures, including Julius 
Caesar." Later Don suggests: "The question of who is right remains quite 
complex--as it also does in most of the Chronicle plays. A large part of 
the dramatic intensity lies in that question, which is lost if Caesar is 
presented as some banana-republic dictator (as I have seen it done)." 
Yes, I too have seen Caesar dressed as Castro. And still later Don asks: 
"Is this a case of "presentism?"

I would suggest that seeing the past in terms of the present is 
inevitable. How can it be otherwise? We reconstruct the past from a 
position in the present. We may use artifacts and documents from the 
past in this reconstruction, but those artifacts and documents can only 
be read and interpreted in the present. My students, having read very 
few documents from the early modern period, recurrently tell me how 
people thought back in those days. We scholars are perhaps more 
sophisticated.

Bill

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Cary Dean Barney <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 1 Feb 2007 23:01:26 +0100
Subject: 18.0082 Understanding Antony
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0082 Understanding Antony

There was a wonderful moment in David Farr's RSC production a couple of 
years ago which drove home the emptiness of Antony's manipulative 
funeral rhetoric: right after the crowd dispersed Antony crumpled 
Caesar's "will" and tossed it nonchalantly into a nearby wastepaper 
basket. Anybody see it?

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Shakespeare Quotations

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0087  Friday, 2 February 2007

[1] 	From: 	Tony Burton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 1 Feb 2007 14:15:57 -0500
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0080 Shakespeare Quotations

[2] 	From: 	Skip Nicholson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Friday, 2 Feb 2007 08:20:17 -0800
	Subj: 	RE: SHK 18.0080 Shakespeare Quotations


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Tony Burton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 1 Feb 2007 14:15:57 -0500
Subject: 18.0080 Shakespeare Quotations
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0080 Shakespeare Quotations

Adding briefly to the Agatha Christie list are "By the Pricking of My 
Thumbs" and "Taken at the Flood," while Michael Innes  -- actually a 
bona fide literary scholar and Oxford don, the late J.I.M. Stewart, who 
wrote a book of Shakespeare criticism and among his mysteries 
contributed "[The] Long Farewell" and, as a stretch of sorts "Hamlet, 
Revenge" which deals largely and amusingly with a highly academic troupe 
planning to perform Hamlet and get it "right" as of the then current (c. 
1939) views.  But I'm not sure that any of this contributes much in the 
way of popularizing Shakespearean quotations.  As Innes was a Brit, his 
influence is likely to have been greater on his home turf.

Mystified as ever,
Tony

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Skip Nicholson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Friday, 2 Feb 2007 08:20:17 -0800
Subject: 18.0080 Shakespeare Quotations
Comment: 	RE: SHK 18.0080 Shakespeare Quotations

I've been told that starting sometime in the 20th century a common 
response to the sound of a student breaking wind in a British public 
school classroom was 'O, speak again, bright angel!' Does anyone know if 
this enjoyable story is true?

Cheers,
Skip Nicholson
South Pasadena, CA
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Unknown Play

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0085  Friday, 2 February 2007

[1] 	From: 	Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 1 Feb 2007 12:17:17 -0600
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0076 Unknown Play

[2] 	From: 	Alan Dessen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 1 Feb 2007 14:10:16 -0500 (EST)
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0076 Unknown Play

[3] 	From: 	William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 01 Feb 2007 14:50:57 -0500
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0076 Unknown Play

[4] 	From: 	Matthew Steggle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Friday, 2 Feb 2007 08:46:37 -0000
	Subj: 	Unknown play


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 1 Feb 2007 12:17:17 -0600
Subject: 18.0076 Unknown Play
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0076 Unknown Play

It means a joke or stab (a "bourd"), what Puttenham might call a "privy 
nip," is no joke if it's a true statement.

 >"sooth boord is no boord"

Frank Whigham

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Alan Dessen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 1 Feb 2007 14:10:16 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 18.0076 Unknown Play
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0076 Unknown Play

In response to Tom Reedy's question #1, a London comedy entitled *The 
Play of the Cards* is not extant. Variations on this configuration do 
survive in dialogue (e.g., in Wilson's *The Three Ladies of London*) or 
other comments (as when Richard Lichfield notes that Thomas Nashe while 
at Cambridge played "The Varlet of Clubs"); in *A Knack to Know a Knave* 
(1592?) Honesty uncovers vice in four knaves (a priest, a farmer, a 
courtier, and a coneycatcher). In 1582 the Children of the Chapel Royal 
performed for Queen Elizabeth "A Comedy or Morall devised on a game of 
the Cards," but this item is likely not the London comedy cited by 
Harington. As late as 1626 one of Jonson's "gossips" in *The Staple of 
News* refers to the moral play Vice who might appear "in a Juggler's 
jerkin, with false skirts, like the Knave of Clubs."  However, the 
knaves or varlets of the card deck do not appear in any extant moral play.

For documentation of these items, see my note in *Modern Language 
Review* 62 (1967): 584-5.

Alan Dessen

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 01 Feb 2007 14:50:57 -0500
Subject: 18.0076 Unknown Play
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0076 Unknown Play

A Dictionary of Lowland Scotch:

<http://search.netscape.com/ns/boomframe.jsp?query=sooth+boord&page=1&offset=0&result_url=redir%3Fsrc%3Dwebsearch%26requestId%3Da6303aa2fd8123ce%26clickedItemRank%3D11%26userQuery%3Dsooth%2Bboord%26clickedItemURN%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fbooks.google.com%252Fbooks%253Fid%253DFckRAAAAIAAJ%2526pg%253DRA4-PA205%2526lpg%253DRA4-PA205%2526dq%253Dsooth%252Bboord%2526source%253Dweb%2526ots%253D2xG-Wh1qrJ%2526sig%253DX1gzKQVUSR5LQzOSATrQ1kw66NY%26invocationType%3D-%26fromPage%3DNSCPToolbarNS%26amp%3BampTest%3D1&remove_url=http%3A%2F%2Fbooks.google.com%2Fbooks%253Fid%253DFckRAAAAIAAJ%2526pg%253DRA4-PA205%2526lpg%253DRA4-PA205%2526dq%253Dsooth%252Bboord%2526source%253Dweb%2526ots%253D2xG-Wh1qrJ%2526sig%253DX1gzKQVUSR5LQzOSATrQ1kw66NY>

In Scottish, sooth is used as an adjective, and signifies " true." A 
sooth boord is nae boord ie, a jest with too much truth in it may be no 
jest at all). ...

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Matthew Steggle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Friday, 2 Feb 2007 08:46:37 -0000
Subject: 	Unknown play

"Sooth boord is no boord" - "boord" is Oxford English Dictionary, bourd 
n., a joke or merriment.  In other words, the phrase means "A joke that 
tells the truth isn't a joke".  It's a proverbial phrase - OED sooth a. 
2b quotes a sixteenth-century example of the phrase from John Heywood.

- Matt

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Branagh Hamlet DVD Update

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0086  Friday, 2 February 2007

[1] 	From: 	Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 1 Feb 2007 22:46:18 -0000
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0073 Branagh Hamlet DVD Update

[2] 	From: 	Patty Winter <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 1 Feb 2007 12:04:12 -0800
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0073 Branagh Hamlet DVD Update


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 1 Feb 2007 22:46:18 -0000
Subject: 18.0073 Branagh Hamlet DVD Update
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0073 Branagh Hamlet DVD Update

Tanya Gough wrote:

 >. . . at 4+ hours ("Ken Branagh's endless, uncut, four-hour Hamlet"
 >- Blackadder V) there was a considerable amount of data to
 >transfer and clean up. Oh, yes, and it's a 70mm film, so that's a heck
 >of a lot of pixels.

The 70mm stock doesn't make a difference except that there's more detail 
in the source, so for the same compression method the digital output 
file will be bigger for any given number of pixels. The number of pixels 
is set by the digital output format, not the analogue input.

However, by my rough calculation it's 6 times as many pixels when done 
for High Definition or Blu-Ray video as when done for NTSC/PAL. (About 
2.1M pixels per frame instead of 0.35M.)

All of which is only a preamble to asking if Tanya knows of plans to put 
Shakespeare material in the new, higher definition formats. Ever since I 
realized that to make a DVD from a feature film involves discarding 95% 
of the image data, I've been conscious of the loss.  I know I can't see 
the difference, but there's a principle.

Gabriel Egan

[Editor's Note: Gabriel's statement - "to make a DVD from a feature film 
involves discarding 95% of the image data" - fascinates me. Would he, 
Tanya, or someone else please explain? I was determined not to buy a 
High Definition DVD player or players for my DVD-only system with a 65" 
Mitsubishi DLP TV, Pioneer Elite DVD Player, and Sony Home Theater 
System with an all-region Toshiba DVD player thrown in. My DVD 
collection of Shakespeare titles is enormous, and I cannot imagine 
buying them again in HD. As I said, this system is only used to play 
DVDs; I simply don't watch television. -HMC]

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Patty Winter <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 1 Feb 2007 12:04:12 -0800
Subject: 18.0073 Branagh Hamlet DVD Update
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0073 Branagh Hamlet DVD Update

 >The good news (or bad, depending on how anxious you are) is that our
 >sources tell us that Warner is currently in discussions with Mr. Branagh
 >to schedule the commentary, which still needs to be recorded.  And for
 >those of you collecting such data, textual advisor Prof. Russell Jackson
 >(U. Birmingham) is also being scheduled to contribute to this feature.

For those who aren't already aware, Messrs. Branagh and Jackson put 
together a very fine book when the film was first released. It contains 
the screenplay with Branagh's annotations as to the characters' 
thoughts, actions, and feelings ("Ooo. A bit narked, are we?"), plus 
excerpts from an interesting and amusing diary that Jackson kept during 
the production of the movie ("Trailer heating fails...Why wasn't it 
'Hamlet, Prince of Tuscany'?"). It also has about 20 pages of color 
photos from the film.

Something to keep people going until the DVD comes out! And I see that 
Tanya carries it at Bard Central. (I actually bought my copy at The 
Globe when I visited London in 1998.)

Patty

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Branagh's As You Like It

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0084  Friday, 2 February 2007

From: 		Evelyn Gajowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 1 Feb 2007 09:58:04 -0800
Subject: 18.0072 Branagh's As You Like It
Comment: 	RE: SHK 18.0072 Branagh's As You Like It

A screening of Branagh's As You Like It is scheduled for the 35th annual 
SAA meeting in San Diego in Apr.

Evelyn Gajowski
Department of English
University of Nevada

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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