2007

Shakespeare High Podcast & Invitation

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0027  Tuesday, 16 January 2007

From: 		Amy Ulen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Monday, 15 Jan 2007 23:29:42 -0800
Subject: 	Shakespeare High Podcast & Invitation

Happy New Year to all SHAKSPER members!

One of my goals this year is to add more content to Shakespeare High, 
and I started that by creating a podcast.  The podcast will air 
approximately every two weeks and will include site updates, reviews, 
play/character discussions, interviews, etc.  Those of you who subscribe 
to the podcast and provide feedback/suggestions will drive the content. 
  More information is available at 
http://www.shakespearehigh.com/pac/podcast/index.shtml or in the 
Cafeteria at 
http://www.shakespearehigh.com/cafeteria/index.php?board=3.0 .  The most 
recent podcast includes a review of Seattle Shakespeare's energetic COE.

If you are new to Shakespeare High or have not visited in a while, you 
will also find that we have a new message board.  Unfortunately, we were 
unable to archive the past five years of discussion, but we are looking 
forward to a fresh start.  If you tend to lurk on SHAKSPER, please 
consider joining us in the Shakespeare High Cafeteria 
(http://www.shakespearehigh.com/cafeteria/) and let your voice be heard!

Sincerely,
Amy Ulen
http://www.shakespearehigh.com/

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

F. Murray Abraham stars in rare double bill

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0026  Tuesday, 16 January 2007

From: 		Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, January 16, 2007
Subject: 	F. Murray Abraham stars in rare double bill

FROM:
The Oneida Daily Dispatch
01/15/2007
F. Murray Abraham stars in rare double bill
By Wayne Myers, Dispatch Drama Critic

http://zwire.townnews.biz/site/news.cfm?notn=1&ncdr=1&newsid=17717808&BRD=1709&PAG=461&dept_id=68844&rfi=6

NEW YORK - New York was abuzz as the Delacorte Theater, Central Park 
home of the New York Shakespeare Festival, neared completion in early 
1962. But the story quickly became about the play that New York 
Shakespeare Festival founder Joe Papp selected to inaugurate the 
Delacorte with on June 18, 1962-Shakespeare's 1597 "The Merchant of 
Venice."

The cast featured George C. Scott as the Jewish moneylender Shylock and 
James Earl Jones as the Prince of Morocco.

By that point, "The Merchant of Venice" had a long, colorful history of 
protest. Now the NYSF production-and WCBS-TV's announcement that there 
would be a live telecast of the staging on CBS-was about to enlarge that 
history.

New York City's most influential rabbis came out against the production 
and the telecast of the play, viewing the character of Shylock as 
reinforcing ugly stereotypes of Jews. It became a national story. The 
play would end up running for 17 performances at the Delacorte. Citing 
the international media and research firm Arbitron, Helen Epstein, in 
her book, "Joe Papp: An American Life," wrote that "the televised 
broadcast was seen in 800,000 homes by an estimated audience of two 
million viewers."

There is almost no track record of outrage, however, over performances 
of Christopher Marlowe's 1590 "The Jew of Malta"-probably because it's 
rarely performed now, especially stateside, even in New York. But it was 
hugely popular in London from its first performance around 1590 through 
the closing of the theaters in 1642.

If "The Merchant of Venice" inevitably draws protest for its character 
Shylock, what can be expected from "The Jew of Malta?"

Now Theatre for a New Audience is mounting both plays as a double bill 
with a 14-member ensemble that includes F. Murray Abraham at the Duke on 
42nd Street in New York.

That's chutzpah.

[ . . . ]

Editor's Note: I read an interesting article the other day that I found 
at the website "All About Jewish Theatre," which describes itself as 
"The Global Website to promote and enhance Jewish Theatre and Performing 
Arts Worldwide. The article, "A very Jewish villain," by Jonathan 
Freedland appears to be a reprint from a 2004 edition of the Guardian. 
The piece is a review of Michael Radford's feature film The Merchant of 
Venice with Al Pacino as Shylock. Many of the issues that it examines 
have been much discussed on SHAKSPER in the past: Is The Merchant of 
Venice a profoundly anti-Semitic work? Is Shylock a villain? and so on. 
What I found most interesting was the discussion of the play in the 
medium of film: "For the very nature of the medium aggravates the 
traditional dilemmas of staging The Merchant of Venice." This issue is 
the reason that I mention this review, and I am not inviting a rehashing 
of those topics that have been thoroughly discussed in the past. The 
article can be found at 
http://new.jewish-theatre.com/visitor/article_display.aspx?articleID=1113 
-Hardy


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

A Question

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0024  Monday, 15 January 2007

From: 		Norman Myers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Friday, 12 Jan 2007 18:47:01 -0500
Subject: 	A Question

Fellow SHAKSPERians--

I've heard that the best way to learn is to not be shy about confessing 
one's ignorance.  So. . .

I think I understand "historicism", but what, exactly, is "presentism."

Remember:  Keep it simple.

Thanks,
Norman Myers
Professor Emeritus
Bowling Green State University

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

What's in a Name?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0025  Monday, 15 January 2007

From: 		Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Monday, January 15, 2007
Subject: 18.0018 What's in a Name?
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0018 What's in a Name?

Last week, I solicited suggestions for a name for the upcoming new 
feature that I have been calling the SHAKSPER Roundtable, a designation 
that would distinguish it from the everyday discussions that take place 
on SHAKSPER.

I would like to thank everyone who sent me suggestions. They were 
thoughtful and provocative. Here are some of those I received:

"SHAKSPER High Table"
"The Globe"
"Roundtable Forum Number 1"
Internet-, Web-, Net- or Electronic Seminar
EMPAD, for Electronic Moderated Panel Discussion
The RETREAT, The SANCTUARY, or The WEEDED GARDEN
The PRIVY COUNCIL or The STAR CHAMBER
"Shakespeare Challenge"

If I were assign these responses to two groups, I would call one group 
the creative suggestions and the other the descriptive suggestions.

Roger Leeming <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> represents the creative 
suggestions:

*****
In Love's Labour's Lost, Act I, scene i, lines 13 - 14, the King of 
Navarre says,

'Our court shall be a little academe,
Still and contemplative in living art.'

The editor of The Arden Shakespeare version, H.R. Woudhuysen, notes that 
'academe/academy: a unique Shakespearean form. The Academy was 
originally the name of Plato's school in Athens. It was taken up in the 
mid-fifteenth century by the Medici, rulers of Florence, and imitated at 
other courts, esp. in France, where academies held formal discussions of 
matters relating to philosophy and to the arts.'

Since the following line in the quotation may be interpreted as meaning 
'calmly and consistently meditating on the living quality of art', I 
would respectfully propose 'SHAKSPER Academe' as the title for the 
SHAKSPER Forum/Roundtable since 'academe' is, as aforementioned, a 
uniquely Shakespearean term and since the word describes a distinctive 
'milieu' in which special and formal discussions take place.
*****

Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> represents the descriptive group:

*****
Since the program will  be confined to a narrowly defined topic, and 
there will be a reading list which I presume all participants will be 
expected to follow, with the discussion moderated by a leader, this 
sounds like nothing so much as a "seminar."  Why not just call it that? 
  "Symposium" or even "colloquium" will also do, but are not are precise.
*****

Although I appreciate the more creative suggestions, I was looking for a 
designation that, even though prosaic, was more descriptive. Since 
traffic had been rather slow lately, I decided to put my three choices 
to an informal vote of the membership.

1. SHAKSPER Seminar
OED: "a select group of advanced students associated for special study 
and original research under the guidance of a professor."
American Heritage: "A small group of advanced students in a college or 
graduate school engaged in original research or intensive study under 
the guidance of a professor who meets regularly with them to discuss 
their reports and findings."

2. SHAKSPER Colloquium
OED: "A meeting or assembly for discussion; a conference, council. spec. 
an academic conference or seminar."
American Heritage: "An academic seminar on a broad field of study, 
usually led by a different lecturer at each meeting."

3. SHAKSPER Roundtable (The original title)
OED: "Used generally to denote a number of persons seated round a 
circular table, or imagined as forming a gathering of this kind; spec. 
an assembly of people for a conference or discussions at which all 
participants are accorded equal status Also transf., a collection of 
opinions or remarks on a particular subject.
American Heritage: "A conference or discussion involving several 
participants."

If you have a preference from among these three, please let me know, and 
in a few days I will let the list know my decision.

Hardy

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Globe-ness

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0023  Monday, 15 January 2007

From: 		Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Monday, January 15, 2007
Subject: 	Globe-ness

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

Both of the newspapers I read had articles about an exhibition, 
"Reinventing the Globe" at National Building Museum as part of the 
Shakespeare in Washington festival.

Hardy

New York Times
January 13, 2007
Imagining, and Reimagining, the Globe
By Jeremy Kahn

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/13/theater/13glob.html?_r=1&hp&ex=1168664400&en=4fa5ef6861aebb22&ei=5094&partner=homepage&oref=slogin

WASHINGTON, Jan. 12 - Of all the debates about Shakespeare, it is 
perhaps second only to the enduring controversy over the identity of the 
author himself: what exactly did the Globe Theater, where many of his 
plays were first performed and his troupe resided, look like?

Did it have 16 sides or 8, 20 or 24? The argument swirls with all the 
passion of Stratfordians versus Oxfordians, who each claim the 
playwright as their own.  Over the last 200 years, attempts have been 
made to reconstruct the Globe on almost every continent. And the 
theater's basic design elements, such as they are known, have inspired 
loose architectural interpretations that range from the polygonal 
Festival Theater in Stratford, Ontario, to a Globe made entirely of ice 
hundreds of miles above the Arctic Circle in Sweden.

The continuing fascination with Shakespeare's theater and the myriad 
efforts to replicate its spirit - and, in many cases, its actual form - 
is the subject of "Reinventing the Globe: A Shakespearean Theater for 
the 21st Century," an exhibition that opens on Saturday at the National 
Building Museum here as part of the city's six-month Shakespeare in 
Washington festival.

For the exhibition, a Building Museum curator, G. Martin Moeller Jr., 
commissioned five architects to design hypothetical Shakespearean 
theaters that would evoke the playwright's essence yet be thoroughly 
modern. The resulting proposals are striking and whimsical and sometimes 
just a little bit weird, not unlike Shakespearean drama itself.

Before arriving at these contemporary concepts, however, the exhibition 
walks through a history of the Globe and what can only be termed Globe 
mania. In 1599 Shakespeare's acting company, the Lord Chamberlain's Men, 
paid for construction of the Globe on the south bank of the Thames, in 
what was then emerging as London's theater district.

[ . . . ]

The Washington Post
All the World's His Stage
By Philip Kennicott
Monday, January 15, 2007; C01

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/01/14/AR2007011401289.html
The Globe, Yesterday and Tomorrow

The Globe Theatre, the site of so many of Shakespeare's theatrical 
triumphs, is a fetish object.

It is the Valhalla of Bardolotry, a place every decently educated school 
kid can picture in detail even if, as scholars readily admit, much of 
what it looked like is simply unknown. As a piece of architecture, it 
has been dust and compost for more than four centuries, but the Globe 
keeps recurring, being rebuilt and re-imagined, as if only there (or in 
some facsimile) can Shakespeare really come alive.

At first glance, the National Building Museum might seem an odd choice 
to be brought into the big tent of the Kennedy Center's Shakespeare in 
Washington festival. But, of course, there's always the Globe, and so 
the museum is doing its part, with an exhibition devoted to the old 
Elizabethan polygon, open to the air, on the south bank of the Thames.

The surprise is that "Reinventing the Globe: A Shakespearean Theater for 
the 21st Century," which opened Saturday, is smart, fresh and 
idiosyncratic. Perhaps because architecture is an art with real money at 
stake, or perhaps because architects are by nature intellectually lively 
people, the highlight of the Kennedy Center's rather diffuse Shakespeare 
festival may turn out to be this small but lively survey devoted to the 
larger idea of "Globe-ness."

The show is divided into two parts. The first is a historical look at 
Elizabethan theaters, and at the persistent fascination with re-creating 
the Globe over the ages. The second half shows the work of five 
different architects or architectural teams who were given the challenge 
of rethinking the Globe for a new era. Their contributions amount to a 
fascinating overview of the strengths and pathologies of contemporary 
architecture, including the strange obsession for getting people 
"engaged" with friendly or open buildings (as if cold and serene 
buildings, like the Taj Mahal, or dour, overbearing ones, like the 
Pantheon, weren't "engaging" enough). So the exhibition moves from the 
old Globe, seen in drawings and paintings and described in old 
documents, to the globe itself, suggested by one theatrical plan that 
would use Internet technology to link multiple performances of 
"Macbeth," around the world, together into a seamless, virtual show.

[ . . . ]

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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