2007

Lear and Job

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0775  Saturday, 24 November 2007

[1] 	From:	Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Tuesday, 13 Nov 2007 14:12:13 -0500
	Subj:	Re: SHK 18.0762 Lear and Job

[2] 	From:	Elliott Stone <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Tuesday, 13 Nov 2007 22:16:46 -0500
	Subj:	Re: SHK 18.0762 Lear and Job


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Tuesday, 13 Nov 2007 14:12:13 -0500
Subject: 18.0762 Lear and Job
Comment:	Re: SHK 18.0762 Lear and Job

Of course, the supposed parallels between Job and Lear have long been 
discussed. But I wonder if anyone has commented on the structural 
similarities between Timon of Athens and the Book of Job. Timon, who 
begins as a rich man and suddenly loses everything, spends the second 
half of the play crouching in the wilderness engaging in dialogues with 
a series of "comforters."

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Elliott Stone <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Tuesday, 13 Nov 2007 22:16:46 -0500
Subject: 18.0762 Lear and Job
Comment:	Re: SHK 18.0762 Lear and Job

Hannibal Hamlin suggests that an ideal question for the list would be 
"What is the earliest printed reference to a relationship between King 
Lear and the Book of Job?"

I would suggest rather-" What is the earliest printed reference to a 
connection between Shakespeare's King Lear and King Cinyras of Book 10 
of Ovid's Metamorphoses?"

I ask this question in view of the following sentence taken from the 
Wikipedia review of Jane Smiley's 1991 Pulitzer Prize novel "Thousand 
Acres".

"Lear, however, is transformed into a child molester, and his malicious 
daughters are portrayed as hapless victims of his perverted lust".

I am sure that Smiley has read and understood both her Lear and her 
Ovid. The reviewer of her book, however, does not want to even entertain 
the unpleasant
idea that Shakespeare might have had incest on his mind!

Best,
Elliott H. Stone

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Shakespeare as Falstaff

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0774  Saturday, 24 November 2007

From:		John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Tuesday, 13 Nov 2007 19:55:35 -0000
Subject: 18.0765 Shakespeare as Falstaff
Comment:	Re: SHK 18.0765 Shakespeare as Falstaff

Larry Weiss wrote:

 >I thought it is generally believed that Heminges played Polonius and
 >Shakespeare played the Ghost (maybe doubling as Player King).

Those beliefs are not based on too much that is solid. I am suggesting 
that Heminges only later took over roles that had been first played by 
Shakespeare himself.

 >As for the possible puns in Falstaff's name, let us not overlook the
 >phallic one.

That pun is also all too obvious in the name "Shakespeare".

Dan Venning wrote:

 >Having dramaturged THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR, I
 >definitely feel that while Falstaff is the largest role, the
 >leading role of that play is actually Master Ford.

It is "generally believed" (to coin a phrase) that Ford was played by 
Richard Burbage.

John Briggs

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Book Announcement - First volume of the AIRS Series

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0772  Saturday, 24 November 2007

From:		Michele Marrapodi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Saturday, 24 Nov 2007 17:26:24 +0100
Subject:	Book Announcement - First volume of the AIRS Series

Book Announcement
First volume of the AIRS series (Ashgate).

Italian Culture in the Drama of Shakespeare & His Contemporaries:
Rewriting, Remaking, Refashioning
Edited by Michele Marrapodi
(Anglo-Italian Renaissance Studies No. 1)
Aldershot: Ashgate, 2007.

"Applying recent developments in new historicism and cultural 
materialism - along with the new perspectives opened up by the current 
debate on intertextuality and the construction of the theatrical text - 
the essays collected here reconsider the pervasive influence of Italian 
culture, literature, and traditions on early modern English drama. The 
volume focuses strongly on Shakespeare but also includes contributions 
on Marston, Middleton, Ford, Brome, Aretino, and other early modern 
dramatists."

Contents.
Introduction. Appropriating Italy towards a new approach to Renaissance 
drama
Michele Marrapodi

Part I: Rewriting Italian prose and drama
Pastoral jazz from the writ to the liberty
Louise George Clubb

Harlequin/harlotry in Henry IV, Part One
Frances K. Barasch

The mirror of all Christian courtiers: Castiglione's Cortegiano as a 
source for Henry V
Adam Max Cohen

Shakespeare's romantic Italy: novelistic, theatrical, and cultural 
transactions in the Comedies
Michele Marrapodi

Virtuosity and mimesis in the Commedia dell'arte and Hamlet
Robert Henke

Gascoigne's Supposes: Englishing Italian 'error' and adversarial reading 
practices
Jill Phillips Ingram

Part II: Remaking Italian myths and culture
'At the cubicolo': Shakespeare's problems with Italian language and culture
Keir Elam

Between myth and fact: The Merchant of Venice as docu-drama
J. R. Mulryne

Harington, Troilus and Cressida, and the poets' war
Lisa Hopkins

Shakespeare's dreams, sprites, and the recognition game
Nina daVinci Nichols

Re-make/re-model: Marston's The Malcontent and Guarinian tragicomedy
Jason Lawrence

Part III: Refashioning ideology
Shakespeare and Venice
John Drakakis

'As if a man were author of himself': the (re-)fashioning of the Oedipal
hero from Plutarch's Martius to Shakespeare's Coriolanus
Claudia Corti

'The strongest oaths are straw': ritual inversion in Shakespeare's The 
Tempest
Victoria Scala Wood

Learning to spy: The Tempest as Italianate disguised-duke play
Michael J. Redmond

The courtesan revisited: Thomas Middleton, Pietro Aretino, and 
sex-phobic criticism
Celia R. Daileader

Part IV: Coda
The music of words. From madrigal to drama and beyond: Shakespeare 
foreshadowing an operatic technique
Giorgio Melchiori

Select Bibliography
Index

ANGLO-ITALIAN RENAISSANCE STUDIES SERIES
Series Editors
General Editor, Michele Marrapodi, University of Palermo, Italy
Advisory Editors, Keir Elam, University of Bologna, Italy
Robert Henke, Washington University, USA

This series aims to place early modern English drama within the context 
of the European Renaissance and, more specifically, within the context 
of Italian cultural, dramatic, and literary traditions, with reference 
to the impact and influence of both classical and contemporary culture. 
Among the various forms of influence, the series considers early modern 
Italian novellas, theatre, and discourses as direct or indirect sources, 
analogues and paralogues for the construction of Shakespeare's drama, 
particularly in the comedies, romances, and other Italianate plays. 
Critical analysis focusing on other cultural transactions, such as 
travel and courtesy books, the arts, fencing, dancing, and fashion, will 
also be encompassed within the scope of the series. Special attention is 
paid to the manner in which early modern English dramatists adapted 
Italian materials to suit their theatrical agendas, creating new forms, 
and stretching the Renaissance practice of contaminatio to achieve, even 
if unconsciously, a process of rewriting, remaking, and refashioning of 
'alien' cultures. The series welcomes both single-author studies and 
collections of essays and invites proposals that take into account the 
transition of cultures between the two countries as a bilateral process, 
paying attention also to the penetration of early modern English culture 
into the Italian world.

FORTHCOMING TITLES IN THE SERIES

A Bibliographical Catalogue of Italian Books Printed in England, 1558-1603
Compiled by Soko Tomita

Shakespeare, Politics, and Italy: Intertextuality on the Jacobean Stage
Michael J. Redmond

Courtesans, Shakespeare, and Early Modern Drama
Duncan James Salkeld

Old Age, Masculinity, and Early Modern Comedy
Anthony Ellis

Shakespeare and Rome: Identity, Otherness, Empire
Edited by Maria Del Sapio Garbero

Shakespeare and Venice
Graham Holderness

Translating Women: Female Figures in the Elizabethan Versions of 
Boiardo, Ariosto, and Tasso
Selene Scarsi

Machiavelli in the British Isles: Two Early Modern Translations of the 
Principe
Alessandra Petrina

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Austin SHAKESPEARE: STAGED READING TAMBURLAINE

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0773  Saturday, 24 November 2007

From:		Austin SHAKESPEARE <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Tuesday, 20 Nov 2007 15:34:57 -0800
Subject:	Austin SHAKESPEARE: STAGED READING TAMBURLAINE

Austin SHAKESPEARE PRESENTS A STAGED READING OF SCENES TAMBURLAINE Wed. 
7, pm Nov. 28, at Mercury Hall off S. 1st & Cardinal

How often do you get a couple of hours with Marlowe's TAMBURLAINE!? This 
play both enthralled and shocked Elizabethan audiences when it was first 
performed in 1587. Shakespeare's contemporary was enormously popular and 
influential... find out why!!!

Austin SHAKESPEARE PRESENTS A STAGED READING OF SCENES FROM Tamuburlaine 
parts 1 & 2.

FREE Concert Reading will be held November 28 at Mercury Hall, off of 
South 1st Street and Cardinal. Doors will open at 7:00 pm.
Refreshments and Shakespeare-related gifts will be available for purchase.

Performers include:
Liz Fisher, Chris Loveless, Rob Matney, Harvey Guion, Bridget Farias, 
Rommel Sulit, Laura Caslin, James Loehlin, Patricia Pearcy, Justin 
Scalise, Gwen Kelso, Robert Stevens, Chris Sykes, and Jud Farias

MORE
Director for this reading is Ian Manners who served as co-director of 
Austin Shakespeare's production of The Rivals. Austin Shakespeare's 
Artistic Director, Ann Ciccolella asked Manners to direct a reading of 
Marlowe's Tamburlaine, since Manners is eminently qualified as a UT 
professor for more than 33 years, former chair of UT's Middle Eastern 
Studies Dept. and active Austin Shakespeare actor and director. This 
event will feature a talk by Manners framing the story of the play, 
actors reading of key scenes from both of Marlowe's Tamburlaine plays 
and a discussion. Loosely based on the life of the fourteenth century 
Mongol leader, Timur Lang (Timur the Lame), Marlowe's play chronicles 
his protagonist's rise from humble origins as a nomadic shepherd to 
ruler of half of Asia.

EVEN MORE ON TAMBURLAINE

Claiming to be the 'scourge of God', Tumburlaine ruthlessly destroyed 
his enemies, harnessed captive kings to his chariot, and executed one of 
his sons who is absent from the battlefield. But increasingly he was 
forced to confront the limits of his power imposed by the weaknesses of 
those who surround him and by his own mortality. He can "strive and 
rail" against the gods, he can attempt to instruct his sons on how to 
rule and manage his empire, but eventually he must die, and his death is 
not heroic or tragic, but natural, reminiscing about his life and 
conquests, surrounded by companions.

Judging by the number of reported performances and references to 
Tamburlaine in the literature of the period, the play enjoyed 
considerable success. But it also attracted condemnation for what some 
thought were its atheistic and subversive sentiments. The plays are 
filled with events of horrifying cruelty even by the standards of the 
age, but while Marlowe doesn't hide his hero's brutality or ambition, he 
also seems reluctant to condemn Tamburlaine for his restless striving 
for power.

Perhaps this unwillingness to apply conventional moral judgments was 
part of the play's appeal. But for some, Marlowe's protagonist, rising 
above his humble origins, overthrowing the established order, must have 
seemed an unsettling (and dangerous) hero. To others, including  Marlowe 
perhaps, the Tamburlaine of the play embodied some of the virtues of the 
new age, a man of action and a man of words, to be  admired for his 
single-minded determination to rise beyond his station and make his own 
fortune.

 From the Prologue:
We'll lead you to the stately tent of war
Where you shall hear the Scythian Tamburlaine
Threat'ning the world with high astounding terms
And scourging kingdoms with his conquering sword

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare's Local Habitations

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0771  Saturday, 24 November 2007

From:		Krystyna Kujawinska Courtney <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Saturday, 24 Nov 2007 10:12:09 -0600
Subject:	Shakespeare's Local Habitations

_Shakespeare's Local Habitations_ -- a collection of international 
essays is now available (the University of Lodz Press (Wydawnictwo 
Uniwersytetu Lodzkiego), Poland). For further information contact Beata 
Gradowska This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Bob White, who wrote its introduction, deftly explains the main aim of 
the contributors' endevour:  "In the cold, hard language of 
international capitalism, Shakespeare is a global commodity, a currency 
that has credit even more universal than the American dollar and Euro. 
As a consequence, his plays and words, taken in and out of context, have 
been shamelessly exploited, most notably in a cultural imperialism that 
seeks to homogenize and imprint certain values on all countries in the 
world. [. . .  ]. This book examines a range of ways in which the 
phenomenon operates, from the global, the national, the ethnic, the 
individual, to his ubiquitousness in a new media.   [. . ]"

SHAKESPEARE LOCAL HABITATIONS

CONTENTS:
R.S. White,				
Introduction National Shakespeares

Krystyna Kujawinska Courtney,	
 From Kott to Commerce: Shakespeare in Communist and Post-Communist Poland

Werner Habicht,
Shakespeare, the Age of Shakespeare, And Shakespeare Reception	

Murray J. Levith,
Shakespeare and Mao, 1949-1966

Laurence Wright,
Shakespeare in South Africa: 'Alpha' and 'Omega'

Sukanta Chaudhuri,
Shakespeare in India

Alan Brissenden,
Australian Shakespeare

R.S. White,
Australian Shakespeare: Scholarship and Criticism

Local Shakespeares
Li Lan Yong,
Romeos and Juliets, Local/Global	

Paul J.C.M. Franssen,
Arawaks and Caribs: Shakespeare's Tempest and the Indians	

MacDonald Jackson,
All Our Tribe: The Maori Merchant of Venice

Herb Weil,
Whose Dogberry? Or the Afterlife of John Barton's 'Raj' Much Ado	

Ian Maclennan,
"Puzel hath bravely played her part": National Sensibilities in English 
and Canadian Adaptations of Shakespeare's Henry VI in 2002

Rose Gaby,
Zootango's Garden Shakespeare: Hobart 1992-1996

New Media and the Global Village
H.R. Coursen,
Shakespearean Offshoots	

Fiona Brideoake,
 From "Nobody" to "The Author": Shakespeare in Love and the Rewriting of 
History

Michael Best,	
New Silk and Old Sack: Performing Shakespeare in New Media

Heather Nimmo,
Writing Shakespeare
	
_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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