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Home :: Archive :: 2007 :: October ::
Greenblatt on Cardenio
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0656  Tuesday, 2 October 2007

[1]	From: 	Hannibal Hamlin <
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	Date: 	Friday, 28 Sep 2007 08:36:39 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0650 Greenblatt on Cardenio

[2]	From:	Peter Holland <
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	Date: 	Friday, 28 Sep 2007 09:24:22 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0650 Greenblatt on Cardenio

[3]	From: 	Jack Heller<
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	Date: 	Friday, 28 Sep 2007 10:11:59 -0400 (EDT)
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0650 Greenblatt on Cardenio

[4]	From: 	John W. Kennedy <
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	Date: 	Friday, 28 Sep 2007 11:18:35 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0644 Greenblatt on Cardenio

[5]	From: 	Larry Weiss <
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	Date: 	Friday, 28 Sep 2007 19:43:36 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0650 Greenblatt on Cardenio

[6]	From: 	John W. Kennedy <
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	Date: 	Saturday, 29 Sep 2007 09:10:57 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0644 Greenblatt on Cardenio


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Hannibal Hamlin <
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Date: 		Friday, 28 Sep 2007 08:36:39 -0400
Subject: 18.0650 Greenblatt on Cardenio
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0650 Greenblatt on Cardenio

So, if Theobald had discovered manuscripts of previously unknown plays 
of Shakespeare, why did he not include these in his edition?  It seems 
bizarre behavior to publish "Double Falsehood" but to let the actual MS 
on which it was (putatively) based disappear.  If Theobald had been 
simply a hack or fraud, that would be one thing, but he was an important 
editor of Shakespeare.  "Double Falsehood" appeared in 1727, but 
Theobald's edition came out four years later-why was the "rediscovered" 
MS not included (even in an appendix)?  Fishy.  Even fishier, of course, 
is any attempt now to sift out the authentic bits from Theobald's play, 
since, as Jennifer points out, the matter of original collaboration 
isn't even clear.  This would be (sort of) like trying to reconstruct 
Lodge's Rosalynde through analysis of As You Like It.

At any rate, thank to the responders.  My curiosity has been 
sufficiently assuaged.

Hannibal Hamlin
Associate Professor of English
The Ohio State University

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Peter Holland <
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Date: 		Friday, 28 Sep 2007 09:24:22 -0400
Subject: 18.0650 Greenblatt on Cardenio
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0650 Greenblatt on Cardenio

Let me recommend the interesting article by Stephan Kukowski, "The Hand 
of John Fletcher in *Double Falsehood*" Shakespeare Survey 43 
(Cambridge: Cambridge University press, 1991), 81-9. Kukowski explores 
the traces of Fletcher in Theobald's play rather effectively. Luis 
Pujante has also written well on the parallels to Shelton's version of 
Don Quixote in "*Double Falsehood* and the Verbal Parallels with 
Shelton's *Don Quixote*" Shakespeare Survey 51 (Cambridge: Cambridge 
University Press, 1998), 95-105.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Jack Heller<
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Date: 		Friday, 28 Sep 2007 10:11:59 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 18.0650 Greenblatt on Cardenio
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0650 Greenblatt on Cardenio

Does this reconstructed CARDENIO include anything from the play 
variously titled THE SECOND MAIDEN'S TRAGEDY or THE LADY'S TRAGEDY?

I would hope not, but there used to be an edition claiming SECOND 
MAIDEN'S TRAGEDY to be CARDENIO. I've never bought that attribution; THE 
SECOND MAIDEN'S TRAGEDY seems most like a Thomas Middleton play.

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		John W. Kennedy <
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Date: 		Friday, 28 Sep 2007 11:18:35 -0400
Subject: 18.0644 Greenblatt on Cardenio
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0644 Greenblatt on Cardenio

I happen to be in southern Vermont this weekend, to see my brother's kid 
in a high-school production of "Copenhagen," so I'll be attending the talk.

At present, I am not aware of anything that is supposed to survive from 
"Cardenio" except "Double Falshood," with two exceptions, the first 
being the late Charles Hamilton's bizarre attempt to identify "Cardenio" 
with "The Second Maiden's Tragedy" (and Pelion-upon-Ossa claim that 
"Double Falshood" derives there from).

The second exception is the song "Woods, Rocks, and Mountains" by Robert 
Johnson, which Michael Wood believes stood in the place of DF's 
blatantly 18th-century "Fond Echo! Forego thy light Strain". I cannot 
deny that the song would be very well suited to the situation, but I am 
unaware of Wood's positive arguments to put it there.

Ever since Kukowski's "The Hand of Fletcher in 'Double Falshood'", the 
weight of opinion has favored the likelihood of "Double Falshood" having 
been genuinely based on "Cardenio", though it should be noted that 
Theobald himself says that the oldest of his three mss. dated back only 
to the Restoration, so that the text may already have been "improved" 
before Theobald ever saw it.

John W. Kennedy

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Larry Weiss <
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Date: 		Friday, 28 Sep 2007 19:43:36 -0400
Subject: 18.0650 Greenblatt on Cardenio
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0650 Greenblatt on Cardenio

It appears likely that Theobald had a MS of a play based on the Cardenio 
tale in Don Quixote  The MS seems to have had two authors, and Fletcher 
appears quite probably to be one of them. In fact, Theobald recognized 
his style and candidly said as much in the introduction to the second 
edition of DF, even though he was unlikely to have known of Moseley's 
Stationers Registry entry ascribing Cardenio to Fletcher and Shakespeare 
and even though he still insisted that the MSS he worked from were 
entirely WS's work.

The open question is whether the other author was Shakespeare, and the 
verdict must be "not proven":  Only one or two short passages in DF are 
conceivably good enough to ascribe to the pen of WS late in his career; 
but Theobald acknowledged that he revised the play for contemporary 
readers and audiences.  The Shakespearean portions of the known Fletcher 
collaborations (HenVIII and TNK) are rather dense with complex 
tangential imagery, so Theobald might have deliberately made any genuine 
Shakespeare text unrecognizable as such in order to present a commercial 
work.

[6]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		John W. Kennedy <
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Date: 		Saturday, 29 Sep 2007 09:10:57 -0400
Subject: 18.0644 Greenblatt on Cardenio
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0644 Greenblatt on Cardenio

The earthquake can be rescheduled; Stephen Greenblatt has been working 
with "Don Quixote" and "Double Falshood" alone. The paper he read was 
concerned with his own experiment, with Charles Mee, in the nascent 
field of [cultural] mobility studies, in which the Cardenio material 
(and the "Tale of the Curious Impertinent" as well) was used as the raw 
material of a new "Cardenio" by Greenblatt and Mee, featuring 
21st-century American characters, which they further handed on to other 
playwrights in India, Croatia, Japan, etc., with the request that they, 
in turn, write new versions for their cultures. A very interesting 
study, but not primarily Shakespeare scholarship in the usual sense.

John W. Kennedy

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