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Home :: Archive :: 2007 :: October ::
Julius Caesar's Pulpit
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0682  Friday, 12 October 2007

[1]	From: 	David Evett <
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	Date: 	Wednesday, 10 Oct 2007 21:54:18 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0677 Julius Caesar's Pulpit/Paintings in Stratford

[2]	From: 	John Cox <
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	Date: 	Thursday, 11 Oct 2007 10:46:38 -0400
	Subj: 	Pulpit in Julius Caesar


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		David Evett <
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Date: 		Wednesday, 10 Oct 2007 21:54:18 -0400
Subject: 18.0677 Julius Caesar's Pulpit/Paintings in Stratford
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0677 Julius Caesar's Pulpit/Paintings in Stratford

 >First, would anyone know what would have been used
 >to represent a pulpit on the stage during the earliest
 >performances of JULIUS CAESAR? Does Thomas Platter,
 >the Swiss man who saw the play in 1599, say anything
 >about the pulpit?

I assume (on inadequate grounds--the Perseus server is down tonight and 
I was not able to get the references I wanted) that Plutarch (Life of 
Brutus), and Shakespeare, following him, use "pulpit" to translate the 
Latin *rostrum.* The fact would not cancel any ecclesiastical echoes but 
it would complicate them. I also speculate that the railing of the 
brand-new Globe's stage balcony was all the pulpit (or rostrum) that 
Brutus and Antony required.

Oratorically,
Dave Evett

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		John Cox <
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Date: 		Thursday, 11 Oct 2007 10:46:38 -0400
Subject: 	Pulpit in Julius Caesar

In response to Jack Heller's question about the "pulpit" in *Julius 
Caesar*, here's a sneak preview at my note to the passage in the 
forthcoming Internet Shakespeare Edition of the play:

The *pulpit* was a likely a removable raised platform containing *the 
public chair* (TLN 1597), perhaps the same platform that earlier 
contained *Caesar's seat *(TLN 1240). Plutarch refers variously to "the 
pulpit" (p. 828) and "the chair or pulpit for orations" (p. 836), using 
*chair* in an archaic sense to mean *pulpit *(*OED* *chair* *n*.1 5, 
earliest citation from 1648).

John Cox
Hope College

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