2007

Hamlet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0712  Sunday, 21 October 2007

From:		Elliott Stone <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Friday, 19 Oct 2007 18:22:55 -0400
Subject:	Hamlet

The October 8th, 2007 New Yorker has an article on Elizabeth LeCompte 
the director of the Wooster Group who is putting on HAMLET at the Public 
Theatre in N.Y.

I have the following observations:

1. This production is not recommended for Red Sox fans.

2. If your hero is Joe Torre you are due for a bad hair day.

3. I do not think Melky Cabrera is a better actor than Jeter.

4. It seems that this is the same production that was "not quite there" 
in Barcelona or Paris or Beaubourg or St. Ann's Warehouse or in 
Amsterdam. New York she feels is different and it will be "there".

5. It seems that the play's set consists of a big movie screen that 
shows Burton's 1964 Hamlet while aluminum frames splinter around it.

6. It seems that most of the actors that started out with her at the 
"Garage" died of Aids in the 1990s with the exception of her partner 
Gray who in 2001 attempted suicide and who disappeared in 2004 (his body 
found in the East River).

7. It is important to note that LeCompte does not concern herself with 
-Is Hamlet mad or insane? Does he love Ophelia? Does Hamlet desire his 
mother? Is the ghost real? Why bother probing Hamlet's character?

8. LeCompte has had no previous experience with Shakespeare except for 
seeing Burton in 1964 and managed to catch sight of Elizabeth Taylor 
coming out of the stage door.

9. Arthur Miller watched a rehearsal of one of her plays that ripped off 
the "Crucible" and sensibly had a cease and desist letter sent out.

10. It seems that she has been thinking about the play and working on it 
since 2004.

I hope the audience enjoys the production!

Best,
Elliott H. Stone

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Othello at Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0711  Sunday, 21 October 2007

From:		William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Thursday, 18 Oct 2007 18:56:07 -0400
Subject:	Othello at Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park

Last night I was privileged to see Othello directed by Edward Stern in 
the Shelterhouse of Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park. The small stage 
drove some of the choices -- only the Duke, sitting at his desk filled 
with reports -- questions Othello after his elopement with Desdemona. 
Esau Pritchett's Othello was lithe and athletic, and in the last scene 
he kills Desdemona with a long suffocating kiss. R. Ward Duffy's Iago 
was excellent, and his jealousy is clearly mirrored by Othello's. 
Rodrigo (Scott Barrow) stuttered; Emilia (Carine Montbertrand) 
surreptitiously drank. Desdemona (Sarah Dandridge) reminded me of a 
young Hillary Clinton -- a woman who can handle herself. The dress was 
modern. Othello and his men wore Navy whites.

Unfortunately, the production closes on October 21.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Cordelia and Antigone

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0709  Sunday, 21 October 2007

From:		Martin Mueller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Thursday, 18 Oct 2007 11:38:36 -0500
Subject:	Cordelia and Antigone

In the authorial intention thread, Caro Barton asks "Is Cordelia the 
wronged innocent, or a stubborn reflection of her stubborn old man?"

This is a really nice question to which one obvious answer is "both." 
Another way of pursuing the question is to ask why you might ask it just 
as well of Antigone. In fact, the Chorus of that play speculates on 
Antigone's having inherited her father's ferocious disposition.

Is there a historical line (rather than mere analogy) that stretches 
from Antigone to Cordelia? Quite a few years ago, a student of mine 
(Todd Trubey) wrote a very interesting seminar paper that he never 
published. It followed the Gloucester subplot into the story of the 
Paphlagonian king. It doesn't take you very long to recognize that 
you're in the world of the decrepit and blind Oedipus, and the paper 
argued very interestingly that the common analogies between Lear and 
Oedipus may have a fairly strong source relation basis.

Even if you make modest assumptions about Shakespeare's mostly indirect 
knowledge of Greek (he's not unlike Ibsen in that regard), the 
possibility of seeing Cordelia AS Antigone is clearly within his reach. 
And seeing Cordelia AS Antigone is a helpful thing to do, just as it is 
helpful and almost certainly historically accurate to see Mozart's Donna 
Anna AS an Electra.

MM

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Ellen Terry and Shakespeare Conferences

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0710  Sunday, 21 October 2007

From:		courtney glenny <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Thursday, 18 Oct 2007 15:21:56 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:	Ellen Terry and Shakespeare Conferences

I am a master's student at the University of Edinburgh, and I am getting 
my degree in European Theatre. For my dissertation I am planning on 
writing on Ellen Terry, who was a well-known English actress in the 
1800s and was also a writer. I am planning on submitting it for the 
Orlando Project, but need to write on her writings in my dissertation. I 
also want to focus somehow on her performances of Shakespeare, since 
that is of specific interest to me. Does anyone have any suggestions? Is 
there a place in England I could go and research her letters/written work?

Also, if anyone has any information on a Shakespeare conference in 
England, I would love to attend. Please let me know.

Many Thanks!

Courtney Glennny

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Online Book Review: The Gent Upstairs

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0708  Saturday, 20 October 2007

From: 		Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Saturday, October 20, 2007
Subject: 	Online Book Review: The Gent Upstairs

The follow review appeared in today Guardian and the complete review can 
be found online:

http://books.guardian.co.uk/review/story/0,,2194958,00.html

_The Gent Upstairs_
Charles Nicholl
Saturday October 20, 2007

An unpaid dowry, an amorous landlady, a trumpeter and a brothel-keeper 
... Charles Nicholl pieces together the untold story of a Jacobean court 
case and asks what it reveals about the ordinary life of 'a certain Mr 
Shakespeare'

On Monday, May 11 1612, William Shakespeare gave evidence in a lawsuit 
at the Court of Requests in Westminster. His statement, or deposition, 
was taken down by a clerk of the court, writing in an averagely 
illegible hand on a sheet of paper measuring about 12 x 16 inches. At 
the end of the session Shakespeare signed his name at the bottom. It is 
one of six surviving signatures, and the earliest of them (though it can 
hardly be called early: he was 48 years old and already in 
semi-retirement). He signs quickly and rather carelessly. The initial W 
is firm and clear, with that characteristic looping and dotting of the 
final upstroke, but the surname becomes a scrawl and is abruptly 
concluded with an omissive flourish: "Willm Shaks". These abbreviations 
were not dictated by space, as they are in a mortgage-deed of 1613 ("Wm 
Shakspe") which he had to sign on a thin tag of parchment. They 
contribute a note of perfunctoriness, or perhaps impatience.

The signature draws the eye. It is, as the graphologists say, a "frozen 
gesture": it touches this otherwise unlovely piece of paper with 
Shakespeare's physical presence. But what makes this document special is 
not just - not even primarily - the signature. It is the anonymously 
scripted text above it, the text which the signature authenticates as 
Shakespeare's sworn statement. We know the thousands of lines he wrote 
in plays and poems, but this is the only occasion when his spoken words 
are recorded.

The case in which he was testifying is listed in the court registers as 
Belott v Mountjoy. It was a family dispute: trivial, pecuniary, faintly 
sordid - standard fare at the court of requests, whose function was 
broadly equivalent to the small claims courts of today. The defendant, 
Christopher Mountjoy, is described as a "tiremaker", which means that he 
was a maker of the decorative headwear for ladies known generically as 
"head-tires" or "attires". The plaintiff, Stephen Belott, had once been 
Mountjoy's apprentice and was now his son-in-law. Both men were French 
by birth but had lived for many years in London.

The Mountjoys' house was on Silver Street in Cripplegate, close to the 
north-west corner of the city walls - a respectable residential street 
of "fair houses" and walled gardens, in which lived doctors and 
surgeons, goldsmiths and moneylenders, though the more pungent amenities 
of Pie Corner and Love Lane were only a few minutes' walk away. This is 
the setting of the story which unfolds in the court proceedings - a 
story which involves William Shakespeare.

[ . . . ]


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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