2007

Most Significant Academic Books on Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0692  Tuesday, 16 October 2007

[1]	From: Julia Griffin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Friday, 12 Oct 2007 15:54:40 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0685 Most Significant Academic Books on Shakespeare

[2]	From:	Hugh Grady <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Saturday, 13 Oct 2007 10:54:22 -0400
	Subj:	RE: SHK 18.0685 Most Significant Academic Books on Shakespeare

[3]	From:	Julia Crockett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Tuesday, 16 Oct 2007 12:40:44 +0100
	Subj:	Most Significant Academic Books


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Julia Griffin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Friday, 12 Oct 2007 15:54:40 -0400
Subject: 18.0685 Most Significant Academic Books on Shakespeare
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0685 Most Significant Academic Books on Shakespeare

Everything by G. Wilson Knight. (He's full of gold.)

Emrys Jones's two books, _The Origins of Shakespeare_ and _Scenic Form 
in Shakespeare_.

Caroline Spurgeon, _Shakespeare's Imagery_ - has no one mentioned it 
yet? Much worked-upon but still so useful.

M.M. Mahood, _Shakespeare's Wordplay_.

All of these quite old books (at least 30 years old), which have 
certainly proved themselves.

I suppose "academic" means that the essays of Auden don't count?

Julia

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Hugh Grady <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Saturday, 13 Oct 2007 10:54:22 -0400
Subject: 18.0685 Most Significant Academic Books on Shakespeare
Comment:	RE: SHK 18.0685 Most Significant Academic Books on Shakespeare

Significant works in Shakespeare studies (among many others):

Robert Weimann, _Shakespeare and the Popular Traditions in the Theater_
Stephen Greenblatt, _Renaissance Self-Fashioning_ and _Shakespearean 
Negotiations_
Carolyn Lenz, Gayle Greene, and Carol Neely (eds.), _The Woman's Part: 
Feminist Criticism of Shakespeare_
Patricia Parker and Geofrey Hartman, eds. _Shakespeare and the Question 
of Theory_
Jonathan Dollimore and Alan Sinfield, eds. Political Shakespeares
Terence Hawkes, _That Shakespeherian Rag_
John Drakakis, ed. _Alternative Shakespeares_

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Julia Crockett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Tuesday, 16 Oct 2007 12:40:44 +0100
Subject:	Most Significant Academic Books

Although not directly a book on Shakespeare, _Michel Foucault's 
Discipline and Punish_,(1977), _La Volonte de Savoir_ (1976), _History 
of Sexuality_ Vol 1 (1978), Jacques Derrida's essay from 1966 
'Structure, Sign and Play' (and his later _Spectres of Marx_) and 
Jacques Lacan's _The Language of the Self_ (1968) feed into Stephen 
Greenblatt's landmark _Renaissance Self-Fashioning_ (1980). Eve Kosofsky 
Sedgwick's _Between Men_, Jonathan Goldberg's _Sodomy and 
Interpretation_ address homosociality/homosexuality. Another - not 
directly Shakespearean but developing and modifying the rich vein of 
ideas in circulation - is Judith Butler's _Bodies Than Matter_ (1993). 
All these thinkers register the dominance of ontology in postmodernism 
in contradistinction to modernism where the dominant was 
epistemological. The most influential modern book on Shakespeare is - or 
should be - eds. Grady and Hawkes, _Presentist Shakespeares_ (2007)

A fictional work of rare genius is Angela Carter's _Wise Children_ 
(1991) which has as its epigraph 'Brush up your Shakespeare.'

Onward, forwards and backwards,
Julia Crockett

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Paintings in Stratford

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0691  Tuesday, 16 October 2007

[1]	From: 	Barbara D. Palmer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Friday, 12 Oct 2007 10:32:40 -0400
	Subj: 	RE: SHK 18.0683 Paintings in Stratford

[2]	From: 	David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Sunday, 14 Oct 2007 23:04:21 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0683 Paintings in Stratford

[3]	From: 	Stanley Wells <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Monday, 15 Oct 2007 11:07:27 +0100
	Subj: 	RE: SHK 18.0683 Paintings in Stratford

[4]	From: 	Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Monday, 15 Oct 2007 11:37:08 -0400 (EDT)
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0683 Paintings in Stratford


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Barbara D. Palmer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Friday, 12 Oct 2007 10:32:40 -0400
Subject: 18.0683 Paintings in Stratford
Comment: 	RE: SHK 18.0683 Paintings in Stratford

For an early art inventory, see Clifford Davidson's and Jennifer 
Alexander's _The Early Art of Coventry, Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwick and 
Lesser Sites in Warwickshire: A Subject List of Extant and Lost Art 
Including Items Relevant to Early Drama_ , Early Drama, Art and Music 
Reference Series 4 (Kalamazoo: Medieval Institute Publications, 1985).

Barbara D. Palmer

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Sunday, 14 Oct 2007 23:04:21 -0400
Subject: 18.0683 Paintings in Stratford
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0683 Paintings in Stratford

 >the Privy Council backtracked on windows - they were to be broken only 
if the window was to be reglazed.
 >
 >As a result, the only religious images in English churches for the 
next 300 years were the stained glass.

Peter Bridgeman's comment does not fully apply even to Elizabethan 
iconoclasm, as windows in many parish churches--to say nothing of the 
monasteries--were destroyed. And whatever Elizabeth's Privy Council 
ordered, the enthusiasts of the C17 interregnum were less particular, so 
that although the windows of many churches escaped (in some cases 
because the local people removed and hid them), others were less 
fortunate. Hence while much of the medieval work survives in the 
cathedrals of York, Salisbury, Exeter, Gloucester, much was destroyed at 
Ely, Peterborough, and elsewhere. At Winchester, a good many fragments 
of the medieval windows were rescued and re-used, but the windows as 
wholes did not survive.

David Evett

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Stanley Wells <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Monday, 15 Oct 2007 11:07:27 +0100
Subject: 18.0683 Paintings in Stratford
Comment: 	RE: SHK 18.0683 Paintings in Stratford

There is a fine early wall painting in an inn in Stratford - The White 
Swan - of the Apocrypha story of Tobias and the Angel. It is reproduced 
in Rene Weis's recent biography, Shakespeare Revealed.

Stanley Wells

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Monday, 15 Oct 2007 11:37:08 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 18.0683 Paintings in Stratford
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0683 Paintings in Stratford

I appreciate the answer from Peter Bridgman, but it opens a few new 
questions for discussion:

 >What was discovered in the 19th century was a large 'Doom' (Last
 >Judgement) under the 16th century whitewash in Stratford's Guild Chapel.
 >Michael Wood's book 'In Search of Shakespeare' has a photo of the Guild
 >Chapel Doom as it is today (very damaged), plus a useful reconstruction
 >of what it would have looked like. Here is part of the reconstruction 
. . .
 >
 >http://www.ecclsoc.org/wenhaston/stratfull.jpg

I first became aware of the Guild Chapel art from a reproduction of a 
St. George image in James Shapiro's A YEAR IN THE LIFE. The St. George 
image is not included in that link, so would there be more images 
available than the link includes?

 >Unfortunately my copy of Wood's book is not at hand, but I believe I'm
 >right in saying that the whitewashing was done only a matter of months
 >before WS's birth. WS is therefore unlikely to have ever seen any medieval
 >wall paintings - at least not in Stratford.

Perhaps Shakespeare would not have seen them, but as Shapiro suggests, 
he might well have heard them described. I am currently working on 
JULIUS CAESAR, a play Shapiro discusses, and there are moments in the 
play that seem strongly suggestive of some contemporary art, both in 
northern and southern Europe, both Catholic and Lutheran. It is very 
difficult to find similar imagery from England in the time of 
Shakespeare, but, as I think sonnet 73 might support, collective memory 
of the imagery might still have a powerful influence. This is why I am 
hoping to get as complete a source as possible of what images are 
reported to have existed in Stratford.

 >For the removal of religious art generally, see Eamon Duffy:  'The
 >Stripping of the Altars' (Yale, 1992). In February 1548 Thomas Cranmer
 >ordered the "total removal of images" in churches (Duffy, p.458).
 >Paintings, statues and altar-pieces were burnt; wall paintings were
 >whitewashed over and replaced with scriptural verses condemning idolatry;
 >stained-glass windows were to be removed and replaced with plain glass
 >(Cranmer later reversed this order as there was not enough
 >replacement glass in the country). Because they contained scripture,
 >illuminated books (psalters etc) were not destroyed. Although Mary's reign
 >refilled the churches with new images, these were again removed by
 >Elizabeth's Injunctions of 1559, which outlawed "all religious images,
 >including those in window and wall" (Duffy, p. 568). Again, the Privy
 >Council backtracked on windows - they were to be broken only if the
 >window was to be reglazed.

If windows were not all broken-and it seems that George Herbert has seen 
some still bearing biblical images, it would be helpful to get a good 
catalogue of those we know to have existed in the 16th century. I have 
seen a stained glass image from France of people bathing in baptismal 
fonts of Christ's blood, an image that strongly suggests the language in 
the play of the conspirators bathing in Caesar's blood. I would be very 
interested in knowing more about the stained glass imagery we can learn 
about in Shakespeare's time.

 >As a result, the only religious images in English churches for the next
 >300 years were the stained glass. Religious images only reappeared in
 >Anglican churches with the Oxford Movement of the 1840s.

I think this overlooks one other source of religious images in the 
English churches-illustrated books. Not just illuminated bibles, but 
also such books at Foxe's ACTS AND MONUMENTS, which indeed illustrated 
the stripping of the altars. Even those images might give us some sense 
of the content of what was stripped.

Jack Heller

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

The Works of Francis Bacon

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0689  Tuesday, 16 October 2007

From: 		Elihu Pearlman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Sunday, 14 Oct 2007 15:16:38 -0600
Subject: 	The Works of Francis Bacon

I have the fifteen volume English and Latin Spedding-Ellis edition of 
The Works of Francis Bacon (1862).  I've owned it since 1964 and would 
now like to pass it along to a youngish scholar with a genuine interest 
in Bacon.  It's free to an appropriate person.

Please write to me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Pulpit in Julius Caesar

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0690  Tuesday, 16 October 2007

From: 		Alan Dessen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Friday, 12 Oct 2007 11:06:25 -0400
Subject: 	Pulpit in Julius Caesar

To follow up on David Evett's "speculation" (with which I concur), the 
original question ("what would have been used to represent a pulpit on 
the stage during the earliest performances of JULIUS CAESAR?") should be 
preceded by a previous question: is the Folio stage direction ("Enter 
Brutus and goes into the Pulpit, and Cassius, with the Plebeians" - TLN 
  1528-9) *theatrical* or *fictional* (these are Richard Hosley's 
terms)? For an account of the distinction see the entry for "fictional 
stage directions" in our 1999 *Dictionary of Stage Directions*. To 
summarize, for Hosley fictional s.d.s "usually refer not to theatrical 
structure or equipment but rather to dramatic fiction" whereas 
theatrical directions "usually refer not to dramatic fiction but rather 
to theatrical structure or equipment." Examples of the former are "on 
shipboard," "within the prison," "enter the city" as opposed to 
theatrical signals such as "within," "at another door," "scaffold thrust 
out." The same onstage event can therefore be signaled by both "enter 
above" and "enter upon the walls [of a city"], with the second locution 
the fictional version of the first. The clearest theatrical signals are 
practical directions about properties and personnel; in contrast, in 
fictional directions a dramatist sometimes slips into a narrative, 
descriptive style seemingly more suited to a reader facing a page than 
an actor on the stage so as to conjure up a vivid image more appropriate 
to a cinematic scene than an onstage effect at the Globe: "the Romans 
are beat back to their Trenches" (*Coriolanus*, 523, 1.4.29), Jonas 
"cast out of the Whale's belly upon the Stage" (*Looking Glass for 
London*, 1460-1).

As with the pulpit, complications can arise when a reader today cannot 
be certain if a direction is theatrical (and therefore calls for a 
significant property such as a tomb or tree) or fictional (so that a 
sense of a tomb, tavern, ship, or forest is to be generated by means of 
language, costume, hand-held properties, or appropriate actions in 
conjunction with the imagination of the playgoer). Such complications 
are further compounded by the presence of an explicit or implicit *as 
[if]*. For example, "Enter Sanders's young son, and another boy coming 
from school" (*Warning for Fair Women*, F4r) may be merely a fictional 
telling of the story, but if construed as "[as if] coming from school," 
the two boys could be dressed in distinctive costumes and carrying 
books. A fictional signal such as "enter on the walls" requires only 
that the figure enter above/aloft; other seemingly fictional signals 
("coming from school," Jonas "[as if] out of the Whale's belly") may in 
contrast convey some practical instructions albeit in an Elizabethan code.

As with the *trenches* in *Coriolanus*, the term *pulpit* does appear in 
North's Plutarch but does not appear elsewhere in our database of 22,000 
s.d.s. My educated guess is therefore that a playgoer in 1599 saw the 
two orators in 3.1 placed above at a railing (David Evett's speculation) 
with no special property needed. I freely admit that I have no pipeline 
to Shakespeare's "intention" in this matter (if indeed he is the one 
responsible for the Folio s.d.), but my conclusion is based on my 
understanding of the theatrical practice of the time.

Alan Dessen

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

CFP Hamlet - Reception in European Cultures

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0688  Tuesday, 16 October 2007

From: 	 Jane Susanna Ennis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 	 Tuesday, 16 Oct 2007 15:29:03 +0100 (BST)
Subject: CFP Hamlet - Reception in European Cultures

Call for Papers

Hamlet-Reception in European Cultures
Cardiff University
11-13 September 2008

Conference organisers:
Prof Gerrit-Jan Berendse
Dr Ruth Owen

Shakespeare's _Hamlet_ exemplifies a source text prolifically 
appropriated by countless national cultures throughout Europe. The 
Cardiff Conference will examine adaptations and transformations of 
storylines, characters, motifs, and text from the play. Papers are 
invited that examine the reception of _Hamlet_ in one or more instances 
of literary or visual culture. Plays, poetry, novels, films, and graphic 
art have all engaged with _Hamlet_. Adaptation makes the _Hamlet_ 
material fit for new cultural contexts and different political 
ideologies to those of Shakespeare's time and place. Many of these works 
are iconoclastic, <B>talking back</B> to Shakespeare. The relationship 
to the original remains present and relevant, but a grafting takes 
place, to produce an entirely new artifact.

The reception of _Hamlet_ is a form of collaboration across time and 
across languages. It can involve the revaluation of a character, provide 
a back-story, or offer a voice to figures originally marginalized. The 
movement into a different genre can present a re-reading of _Hamlet_ 
from a revised viewpoint. We are thinking of prolonged engagement, 
rather than passing allusion. A political or ethical commitment often 
shapes a writer's or artist's decision to re-interpret _Hamlet_. 
Theoretical concerns from post-colonialism, feminism and queer studies 
figure in many of the adaptations. With this in mind, the aim of the 
conference is to consider the processes by which aspects of 
Shakespeare's play have been transmitted and received within European 
cultures.

We welcome papers which relate to cultures operating in every European 
language. However, we can only accept papers given in English.

We welcome submissions in the following areas:

I.   _Hamlet_ -reception and language; and gender; and images of war; 
and the body; and current affairs; and aesthetic innovation
II.   Shakespeare as a European icon; as a vehicle of literary 
evolution/revolution; as representative of Britishness
III.  Hamlet and various individual modern European texts
IV.   Hamlet in European visual arts

Please submit your abstract to Ruth Owen, as an email attachment.

Deadline for the submission of abstracts: 14 January 2008
Submission address: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Other expressions of interest in the conference may also be made to the 
same address.

Conference website:
http://www.cf.ac.uk/euros/hamlet.html

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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