2007

New Book: RELIGION IN THE AGE OF SHAKESPEARE

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0632  Friday, 24 September 2007

From: 		Christopher Baker <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Friday, 21 Sep 2007 14:43:19 -0400
Subject: 	New Book: RELIGION IN THE AGE OF SHAKESPEARE


I am pleased to announce the publication of my reference volume from 
Greenwood Press, RELIGION IN THE AGE OF SHAKESPEARE.

Christopher Baker

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
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Paula Vogel's DESDEMONA -- One Night Only!

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0631  Friday, 24 September 2007

From: 		Red Bull Theater <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Sunday, 23 Sep 2007 12:27:16 -0400
Subject: 	Paula Vogel's DESDEMONA -- One Night Only!

Mamie Gummer, Jessica Hecht, and Jennifer Ikeda -- Paula Vogel's 
DESDEMONA -- Monday Oct 1 -- One Night Only!

OBIE Award-Winning Revelation Reading Series Returns
Monday October 1st, 7pm
Honorary Benefit Hostess and Academy Award-Winning Actress
MARISA TOMEI invites you to attend
A benefit for Red Bull Theater:
<http://www.ticketcentral.com/showdetails2.asp?showid=1463>
DESDEMONA: A play about a handkerchief
by Pulitzer Prize-Winner
PAULA VOGEL

Starring
MAMIE GUMMER
JESSICA HECHT
and
Jennifer Ikeda

Othello, as seen from the perspective of the women in the play-a 
hilarious, satirical and provocatively alternative view of Shakespeare's 
tragedy.

Directed by Jesse Berger (The Revenger's Tragedy).
Cocktail reception with the playwright, actors, and live music follows 
the reading,
featuring Americana singer-songwriter-actor Addie Brownlee.
<http://www.addiebrownlee.com/>

Reserve Tickets Now
FULL PRICE $75
STUDENTS/INDUSTRY $25
<http://www.ticketcentral.com/showdetails2.asp?showid=1463>
TicketCentral.com: 212.279.4200

Other Special Guests will include:
Michael Cerveris (Sweeney Todd), Daniel Breaker (Pericles), Matthew 
Rauch (The Revenger's Tragedy), Marc Vietor (The Revenger's Tragedy), 
Margot White (Pericles), and many more.

REVELATION READINGS: October 1, 2007 - January 21, 2008
<http://www.redbulltheater.com/current.html>

Monday October 8, 7pm
<http://www.ticketcentral.com/showdetails2.asp?showid=1464>
The Changeling
by Thomas Middleton and William Rowley

Lust, murder, adultery, and lunacy - it doesn't get more Jacobean than 
this masterpiece of mayhem.

Directed by Karin Coonrod (Henry VI)
Featuring David Patrick Kelly (Twelfth Night, Twin Peaks), Juliana 
Francis (Maria del Bosco), and Matthew Rauch (The Revenger's Tragedy)

Monday October 22, 7pm
<http://www.ticketcentral.com/showdetails2.asp?showid=1466>
Tallgrass Gothic
by Melanie Marnich

A stunning, lyrical re-telling of The Changeling set in contemporary 
rural Minnesota.

New York Premiere
Directed by Leigh Silverman (Well)
Featuring Tony Award-Winner Michael Cerveris (Sweeney Todd)

Monday October 29, 7pm
<http://www.ticketcentral.com/showdetails2.asp?showid=1465>
The Just
by Albert Camus, adapted and newly translated by Anthony Clarvoe

Is violence ever the answer?  Even if the cause is just?  Step inside a 
terrorist cell circa 1905 and peer into the hearts and minds of young 
people willing to kill and die for what they believe.

Directed by Ethan McSweeny (Best Man)
Featuring Obie Award-Winner Michael Stuhlbarg (Pillowman) and Tony 
Award-Winner Ellen McLaughlin (Angels in America)

Monday November 12, 7pm
<http://www.ticketcentral.com/showdetails2.asp?showid=1467>
The Rover
by Aphra Behn, adapted by John Barton

A trio of English rakes looking for kicks in 17th century Spain meets a 
trio of Spanish sisters looking for husbands at carnival in this raucous 
and raunchy restoration comedy by the first woman to make her living as 
a playwright.

Directed by Eleanor Holdridge
Featuring Daniel Breaker (Pericles, Passing Strange) and Carla Harting 
(Eurydice)

Monday November 26, 7pm
<http://www.ticketcentral.com/showdetails2.asp?showid=1468>
The Lady's Not For Burning
by Christopher Fry

In a world of hypocrisy, post-war superstition and witch-hunting, a man 
returns from war to find love and redemption in spite of his 
circumstances, all in a hilariously chaotic mix of characters wrapped up 
in a poetic tangle of fun.

Directed by Tony Award-Winner Joseph Hardy (Child's Play)
Featuring Lynn Redgrave and Richard Easton

JANUARY READINGS:

*        Monday January 7, 7pm:
<http://www.ticketcentral.com/showdetails2.asp?showid=1469>
Bertolt Brecht's Edward II, a radical 20th century revision of the 
Elizabethan classic.
Featuring cast members from our production of Marlowe's play, directed 
by Michael Sexton.

*        Monday January 14, 7pm:
<http://www.ticketcentral.com/showdetails2.asp?showid=1470>
Don't Fuck With Love, a contemporary spin on Alfred de Musset's love 
tragicomedy by Kay Matschullat, interpolating Abelard, Heloise, instant 
messaging, and the power elite, directed by Lear deBessonet.

*        Monday January 21, 7pm:
<http://www.ticketcentral.com/showdetails2.asp?showid=1471>
The Cardinal, by James Shirley, directed by Carl Forsman, starring Roger 
Rees and Philip Goodwin.  The last of the great Elizabethan dramatists 
explores corruption in the church through a wonderfully tangled web of 
deceit, plots, love affairs, poison and death.

LOCATION
<http://maps.yahoo.com/maps_result?addr=416+West+42nd+Street&csz=New+York%2CNY++10036&country=us&new=1&name=&qty=>
Playwrights Horizons/Peter Jay Sharp Theater
416 West 42nd Street, between 9th & 10th Avenues
Trains: A/C/E to 42nd Street or the N/Q/R or 1/9 to Times Square
Parking: Alliance Parking, 500 West 43rd Street at 10th Avenue

TICKETS
$20 Adults
$10 Students
$75 Desdemona Benefit
$200 Subscription Package to all 9 Readings
<http://www.ticketcentral.com/>www.ticketcentral.com
212.279.4200

COMING SOON
Christopher Marlowe's Edward the Second
<http://www.redbulltheater.com/current.html>
Adapted by Garland Wright, Directed by Jesse Berger
Performances start December 11th at the Peter Jay Sharp Theater
Tickets on sale October 1st: www.ticketcentral.com
<http://www.ticketcentral.com/>

Jesse Berger
Artistic Director
PO Box 250863
NEW YORK NY 10025
<http://www.redbulltheater.com/>www.redbulltheater.com
212.414.5168
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

WHO WE ARE

Red Bull Theater is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit company dedicated to the 
presentation of vital and imaginative productions of heightened language 
plays and to the development of new plays written in a similar vein. 
With a special focus on the Jacobean plays of Shakespeare and his 
contemporaries, Red Bull Theater aspires to challenge the intellect and 
engage the imagination of today's theatergoers through language-based, 
company-created, resonantly provocative stagings of great classic stories.

Donations to Red Bull Theater are fully tax-deductible to the extent 
permitted by law.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

WashPost: Ourselves in Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0629  Thursday, 20 September 2007

[1] 	From: 		John W. Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 		Wednesday, 19 Sep 2007 09:53:35 -0400
	Subj: 		Re: SHK 18.0624 WashPost: Ourselves in Shakespeare

[2] 	From: 		Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 		Wednesday, 19 Sep 2007 12:45:38 -0400
	Subj: 		Re: SHK 18.0624 WashPost: Ourselves in Shakespeare

[3] 	From: 		Robert Projansky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 		Wednesday, 19 Sep 2007 22:47:39 -0700
	Subj: 		Re: SHK 18.0624 WashPost: Ourselves in Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		John W. Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 19 Sep 2007 09:53:35 -0400
Subject: 18.0624 WashPost: Ourselves in Shakespeare
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0624 WashPost: Ourselves in Shakespeare

Robert Projansky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

 >Re Innogen/Imogen, is it not possible that in setting the
 >type for Imogen the compositor simply used "nn" to make
 >an "m"? I may be wrong, but I think that somewhere in my
 >FF facsimile I've seen "vv" used to make a "w".

But m is not and never has been conceptualized as a double n. Moreover, 
the name "Innogen" occurs near the top of the page, where the 
compositors are not likely to have run out of m's.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 19 Sep 2007 12:45:38 -0400
Subject: 18.0624 WashPost: Ourselves in Shakespeare
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0624 WashPost: Ourselves in Shakespeare

Personally, I can't see what difference it makes whether she is Imogen 
or Innogen.  But if the compositor accidentally inserted an upside down 
"u" in the forme, then she is "Ivogen" and that resonates with 
Agamemnon's daughter.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Robert Projansky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 19 Sep 2007 22:47:39 -0700
Subject: 18.0624 WashPost: Ourselves in Shakespeare
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0624 WashPost: Ourselves in Shakespeare

As I am not a scholar I prefer to enjoy these kinds of wars from the 
sidelines, but I am puzzled why Prof. Drakakis says, "If we modernise 
the spelling to give the reading 'Masters of passion' then obviously 
this doesn't make sense."

Here it is in context in the FF, with 'Masters' for Maisters':

You'l aske me why I rather choose to haue
A weight of carrion flesh, then to receiue
Three thousand Ducats? Ile not answer that:
But say it is my humor; Is it answered?
What if my house be troubled with a Rat,
And I be pleas'd to giue ten thousand Ducates
To haue it bain'd? What, are you answer'd yet?
Some men there are loue not a gaping Pigge:
Some that are mad, if they behold a Cat:
And others, when the bag-pipe sings i'th nose,
Cannot containe their Vrine for affection.
Masters of passion swayes it to the moode
Of what it likes or loaths, now for your answer:
As there is no firme reason to be rendred
Why he cannot abide a gaping Pigge?
Why he a harmlesse necessarie Cat?
Why he a woollen bag-pipe: but of force
Must yeeld to such ineuitable shame,
As to offend himselfe being offended:
So can I giue no reason, nor I will not,
More then a lodg'd hate, and a certaine loathing
I beare Anthonio, that I follow thus
A loosing suite against him? Are you answered?

It seems to me that phrase means in this context that:

Masters made of (or which are our) [inexplicable] passions determine our 
mood
According to what [stimuli] they like or loathe,

Am I wrongly making sense of this?

Best to all,
Bob Projansky

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

What's New at Maryland Shakespeare Festival

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0630  Friday, 24 September 2007

From: 		Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Monday, September 24, 2007
Subject: 	What's New at Maryland Shakespeare Festival

<http://mdshakes.pmailus.com/pmailweb/raf?ide=AYtTpN8J30IHSXwrv7kLSm_DfCA>

Maryland Shakespeare Festival
<http://mdshakes.pmailus.com/pmailweb/f?cide=AdRGxK72EU_CY6t_Tw>

Welcome to the NEW Maryland Shakespeare Festival Newsletter!
A new Year ... A new Home ... A new Festival!

Welcome to a brave new world of Maryland Shakespeare Festival.  The 
2007-2008 season brings lots of changes with new faces, new programs, 
and a brand new indoor performing space -- but the same passion, polish, 
and sense of play!

Come discover a whole new way to play... with Shakespeare performance 
that's understandable, relevant, and most of all fun!  This is NOT your 
grandma's Shakespeare.

We want to keep you up to date with everything that's happening and hope 
that you will not only enjoy our new electronic newsletter but share it 
with your friends.  If you know someone who should know what we're up 
to, please forward this along and help them join the fun!

Maryland Shakespeare has a HOME!
<http://images.patronmail.com/pmailemailimages/1289/89379/articles_2.jpg>

We are thrilled to announce that Maryland Shakespeare Festival has an 
indoor performing space! It's a beautiful two story grand hall at 8 West 
Second Street in the heart of historic downtown Frederick.  All thanks 
to a partnership with Centennial Memorial United Methodist Church.

"It's an ideal partnership", says Pastor Mike Albro of Centennial United 
Methodist Church, "the theater company does such great work and the 
stories of Shakespeare enrich all of our lives, but most importantly it 
helps to reclaim a lost tradition of the church as a hub of our community."

Even more exciting...the wood-paneled great room on Second Street 
closely resembles the architecture of the Elizabethan halls for which 
Shakespeare's plays were written!  We're looking forward to building on 
this architectural similarity and creating a true Elizabethan playhouse 
over the next two seasons.

Actors and audience will play raucously together using live music and an 
informal and interactive performance style to create an immediate and 
invigorating experience of Shakespeare not often expected in classical 
theater.

Come and join us to see this space and our company transform over the 
next year into a truly Shakespearean theatrical experience.

2007-2008 Season ~ Something for Everyone!
<http://images.patronmail.com/pmailemailimages/1289/89379/articles_3.jpg>

In our first winter season, the Festival will present an autumn staged 
reading series: The Dark Heart of Shakespeare, a fully-produced winter 
production of The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged), and 
a spring staged reading series called Love & War Shakespeare Style.  The 
season will conclude with the Good Will Tour of the hilarious Merry 
Wives of Windsor, kicked off under the stars in Frederick before it 
tours the state.  Other activities will include the Riotous Youth's 
student performances, a Scholars Forum, and a Birthday Bash at the 
Weinberg Center in April.  Don't miss out... visit our newly updated web 
page for all the details.

Visit us online for more information about all our programs at 
www.MDShakes.com

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Authorial Intention

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0628  Thursday, 20 September 2007

[1] 	From: 		Clay H. Shevlin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 		Wednesday, 19 Sep 2007 07:43:10 -0700
	Subj: 		RE: SHK 18.0623 Authorial Intention

[2] 	From: 		John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 		Wednesday, 19 Sep 2007 17:19:03 +0100
	Subj: 		Re: SHK 18.0623 Authorial Intention

[3] 	From: 		Duncan Salkeld <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 		Wednesday, 19 Sep 2007 16:29:49 +0000 (GMT)
	Subj: 		Re: SHK 18.0623 Authorial Intention


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Clay H. Shevlin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 19 Sep 2007 07:43:10 -0700
Subject: 18.0623 Authorial Intention
Comment: 	RE: SHK 18.0623 Authorial Intention

A wise man once said, "Regardless of the subject matter, even ignorance, 
when combined with logic and critical analysis, can be a most effective 
intellectual sword."

With a bit more conceit, and a helluva lot more knowledge, I'd call 
myself a bibliographer.  That said, I am a student of descriptive 
bibliography, and Fredson Bowers, who might correctly be called the 
"godfather" thereof, stated that descriptive bibliography is the bridge 
to textual criticism.

Alas, I've not had the opportunity to parse this discussion to my 
satisfaction, but it seems to me that much of it bears (or at least 
could well bear) on the topic of textual criticism.  Does this idea ring 
true for anyone?  If so, has anyone considered or written about the 
schools of thought discussed herein and what implications each may have 
on the role of the descriptive bibliographer?

As to whether or not a reader/scholar can discern authorial intention, 
for some or all "interpretive schools of thought," is it useful to 
distinguish at the outset between creative and expositional writing?  Do 
we need to know authorial intention for a "mainstream" calculus 
textbook?  Do we care?

My apologies if any of the foregoing seems off-topic or a revisitation 
of prior exchanges.

Clay Shevlin

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 19 Sep 2007 17:19:03 +0100
Subject: 18.0623 Authorial Intention
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0623 Authorial Intention

Larry Weiss wrote:

 >I candidly acknowledged in my last post that I prefer to use the word
 >"expectation" rather than "intention," as the former carries less
 >negative freight.  The wisdom of taking that approach is illustrated
 >by John Briggs's submission:
 >
 >there is no problem discussing authors' "expectations", problems
 >only arise when they are elevated to "intentions".
 >
 >Therefore, I shall continue to speak of "expectations" although,
 >frankly, I do so for purely rhetorical reasons.  I personally do not
 >see a meaningful distinction between saying that an author expected
 >the audience to react in a particular way and saying that he wanted
 >them to do so.  As I said above, I also do not see a difference
 >between interpreting a text and determining what the author expected
 >us to understand from the text.

I obviously wrote too concisely. The point I would make is that when we 
are talking about "expectations",  we are (or should be) talking about 
our own assessments (as objectively as we can manage) of what the author 
could reasonably have expected a contemporary audience to have 
understood from his text (whether he did so or not, and whether they did 
so or not) - regardless of what his actual "intentions" were in writing 
it (because those are unknowable now, and were also then) or even (or 
perhaps especially) of what we read the "meaning" (or meanings) of the 
text to be to us.

[This can be difficult when historical irony seems to be employed, as 
when an author writes of an "Upstart Crow", and Shakespeare (in the 
person of Polonius) replies " 'Beautified' is a vile phrase."  This 
exchange seems to pre-suppose serried ranks of Shakespeare scholars, and 
might reasonably be expected to have baffled a contemporary audience. 
(And, yes, I too am being ironic in writing "in the person of Polonius", 
but I leave the joining of the dots as an exercise for the student.)]

John Briggs

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Duncan Salkeld <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 19 Sep 2007 16:29:49 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: 18.0623 Authorial Intention
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0623 Authorial Intention

I fear trails of interminable speculation around the corner, but on 
intentionality:

1. Stephen Knapp and Walter Benn Michaels had a great little essay in 
Critical Inquiry, Summer 1982, entitled 'Against Theory'. It was 
published by Chicago UP, with responses by Stanley Fish, Richard Rorty 
and others, as a book under the same title in 1985. Knapp and Michaels 
argued that meaning and intention were synonymous. It's an argument I'm 
not sure anyone has managed to refute.

2. Pope wrote in The Rape of the Lock:

Here thou, great Anna! whom three realms obey
Dost sometimes counsel take-and sometimes tea.

Is not understanding the bathos, and the poem's mock-heroic genre, only 
possible by getting Pope's intention?

Duncan Salkeld

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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