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Home :: Archive :: 2007 :: July ::
Degree in Shakespeare
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0462  Monday, 9 July 2007

[1] 	From: 	Janet Costa <
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	Date: 	Saturday, 7 Jul 2007 14:07:39 -0700 (PDT)
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0409 Degree in Shakespeare

[2] 	From: 	Sam Small <
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	Date: 	Sunday, 8 Jul 2007 19:45:30 +0100
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0457 Degree in Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Janet Costa <
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Date: 		Saturday, 7 Jul 2007 14:07:39 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 18.0409 Degree in Shakespeare
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0409 Degree in Shakespeare

I have followed this thread with interest, noting that no responder has 
mentioned whether they actually have a degree in Shakespeare.

For those of us who do (and our Eric Luhrs is one), I must say that I'm 
not all that sure if it made us better people (better than what??), but 
it was a very expensive proposition. One of the great rewards, however, 
is sharing stories and anecdotes that only Shakespeare Institute 
graduates can truly appreciate, e.g. Thursday afternoon lectures and tea 
or the BritGrad Conference. It is definitely a once-in-a-lifetime 
experience.

For those who may be interested, Alex Kapila has begun an informal blog 
for SI alumni at

   http://www.facebook.com/p.php?i=873295062&k=8c26ddfe6f

Janet

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Sam Small <
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Date: 		Sunday, 8 Jul 2007 19:45:30 +0100
Subject: 18.0457 Degree in Shakespeare
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0457 Degree in Shakespeare

To Dan Venning: I am sorry that you find me unconvincing and 
un-collegial. What I was asking was quite clear.  Does the study of 
Shakespeare make us better people?  Perhaps I should have added extra 
clarification of "if so, how?"

 >From the answers I got there was nothing definite at all. You inferred
 >that politics was as important as "art, theatre, language, critical 
reading,
 >and plain old entertainment on personal and cultural levels."  This is
 >very strange when the "begetter of this list" wrote about precious little
 >else other than institutional, international and sexual politics - in 
short
 >'morality'.  And I see little difference, as you seem to, in the morality
 >of the individual and the morality of a greater culture.  The former
 >begets the latter, does it not?  How can millions of immoral people
 >represent a moral society?  Don't blame George Bush for getting to
 >be President - blame the American people.

Which brings us full circle to the original premise of my question.  If 
we all had English Literature degrees what sort of foreign policy would 
we have?  Do Shakespeare anoraks make a better and more joyful world? 
If you agree, please tell me how, Dan. (or anyone)

Love and peace,
SAM SMALL

PS: Please don't answer, "entertaining the troops."

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