2007

Shakespeare Golden Ear Test

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0466  Wednesday, 11 July 2007

[1] 	From: 	Edmund Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Monday, 9 Jul 2007 11:16:43 -0400
	Subj: 	Shakespeare Golden Ear Test

[2] 	From: 	Bob Grumman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Monday, 9 Jul 2007 10:38:02 -0500
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0459 Shakespeare Golden Ear Test


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Edmund Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Monday, 9 Jul 2007 11:16:43 -0400
Subject: 	Shakespeare Golden Ear Test

Well, so far, folks have earned some "golden ears," some "silver ears," 
and some "bronze ears." If I do really awful, can I earn a "lead ear"?

Ed Taft

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Bob Grumman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Monday, 9 Jul 2007 10:38:02 -0500
Subject: 18.0459 Shakespeare Golden Ear Test
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0459 Shakespeare Golden Ear Test

I couldn't get through the Golden Ear test.  I took a rest after 
carefully deciding yes or no on twenty of the passages.  When I came 
back, I tried to continue but was ejected from the test.  I'm sure I 
came out with a tin ear. Especially since I recognize the passage from 
the Elegy and said it was by Shakespeare.

For me what makes the test stupid boils down to its being based on a 
pair of invalid premises: (1) that Shakespeare always wrote like 
Shakespeare and (2) that no one else ever wrote like Shakespeare.

--Bob G.l

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Hogging all the best word orders

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0465  Wednesday, 11 July 2007

From: 		Al Magary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Monday, 09 Jul 2007 13:49:30 -0700
Subject: 	Hogging all the best word orders

The NYTimes today had four writers imagine an ending to the Harry Potter 
series (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/08/opinion/08potterintro.html). 
Polly Horvath imagines everyone dying in a blaze of glory--except Harry, 
who trips, and Hermione, who survives and finds herself with a newborn 
in a coffee shop, with pen and notebook.  The waitress asks:

"Isn't it a bit tricky then, writing a bunch of books if you've never 
written anything before?"

"Nah, I got it beat. I figure it's all in arranging words in some sort 
of order. Sentences they call it. Like this one I come up with this 
morning: 'Started out, Could nutshell myself infinite were bad dreams 
God, I count, a king, oh, space bounded in not I have that and it of a 
be.' Then I rearranged things a bit and got this: 'Oh God, I could be 
bounded in a nutshell and count myself a king of infinite space were it 
not that I have bad dreams.' Don't know what it means."

"That's Shakespeare, that is," said the waitress.

"DRATS! Not again. He hogged all the best word orders. Never mind, I got 
the whole day to reorder me words. Bring a piece of cake and keep them 
cups of tea coming. I plans to knock off three of these suckers by 
closing time."

Cheers,
Al Magary

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

CFP: Writing about Performance of Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0463  Wednesday, 11 July 2007

From: 		Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 11 Jul 2007 17:17:46 +0100
Subject: 	Final Call for Papers: Writing about Performance of Shakespeare

With apologies for cross-posting, this is the final CFP for a seminar at 
the 3rd British Shakespeare Association Conference in Warwick UK, 31 
August to 2 September 2007

______________________________
Writing about Performance of Shakespeare

As Pascale Aebischer recently reminded us, writing about performance can 
be likened to tap-dancing about architecture: it is hard to see how one 
way of making meaning can relate to the other. In a recent exchange in 
the British Shakespeare Association's journal, W.B.  Worthen and R.A. 
Foakes, coming from very different approaches, debated how discursive 
writing can describe, engage with, and critique performance, and this 
seminar will take the debate further. The seminar invites papers that 
consider all matters of how writing relates to performance, which might 
include:

* what theatre reviews ought to comment upon

* how far can performance can be theorized?

* does the script 'contain' all the possible performances, or conversely 
does performance necessarily exceed the meanings in the script?

* should insights about theatre practice in Shakespeare's time inform 
writing about his meanings?

* what is theatre history for?

* do we still think Shakespeare was essentially a man of the theatre and 
not a literary author?

Abstracts to seminar leader Gabriel Egan
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Seminar website http://www.gabrielegan.com/BSA

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare and (East) Asian Philosophy/Religion

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0464  Wednesday, 11 July 2007

From: 		Rick Jones <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 11 Jul 2007 14:17:20 -0500
Subject: 	Shakespeare and (East) Asian Philosophy/Religion

Gentles:

I'm looking for materials relating Shakespeare-especially the 
comedies-to East Asian religions and philosophies.  I'm particularly 
interested in exploring the philosophical Taoist concept of yin and 
yang, but Zen, Shinto, Pure Land, Confucianism, etc., all might be 
relevant.  I'm less interested at the moment in Western Asia (e.g. 
Hindu), but if the study expands I might end up going there, as well.

Any suggestions greatly appreciated.

Rick,
who is hoping find a research avenue, prepare for a production, and 
brush up for a course he hasn't taught in four years... all at once

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Degree in Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0462  Monday, 9 July 2007

[1] 	From: 	Janet Costa <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Saturday, 7 Jul 2007 14:07:39 -0700 (PDT)
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0409 Degree in Shakespeare

[2] 	From: 	Sam Small <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Sunday, 8 Jul 2007 19:45:30 +0100
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0457 Degree in Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Janet Costa <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Saturday, 7 Jul 2007 14:07:39 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 18.0409 Degree in Shakespeare
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0409 Degree in Shakespeare

I have followed this thread with interest, noting that no responder has 
mentioned whether they actually have a degree in Shakespeare.

For those of us who do (and our Eric Luhrs is one), I must say that I'm 
not all that sure if it made us better people (better than what??), but 
it was a very expensive proposition. One of the great rewards, however, 
is sharing stories and anecdotes that only Shakespeare Institute 
graduates can truly appreciate, e.g. Thursday afternoon lectures and tea 
or the BritGrad Conference. It is definitely a once-in-a-lifetime 
experience.

For those who may be interested, Alex Kapila has begun an informal blog 
for SI alumni at

   http://www.facebook.com/p.php?i=873295062&k=8c26ddfe6f

Janet

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Sam Small <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Sunday, 8 Jul 2007 19:45:30 +0100
Subject: 18.0457 Degree in Shakespeare
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0457 Degree in Shakespeare

To Dan Venning: I am sorry that you find me unconvincing and 
un-collegial. What I was asking was quite clear.  Does the study of 
Shakespeare make us better people?  Perhaps I should have added extra 
clarification of "if so, how?"

 >From the answers I got there was nothing definite at all. You inferred
 >that politics was as important as "art, theatre, language, critical 
reading,
 >and plain old entertainment on personal and cultural levels."  This is
 >very strange when the "begetter of this list" wrote about precious little
 >else other than institutional, international and sexual politics - in 
short
 >'morality'.  And I see little difference, as you seem to, in the morality
 >of the individual and the morality of a greater culture.  The former
 >begets the latter, does it not?  How can millions of immoral people
 >represent a moral society?  Don't blame George Bush for getting to
 >be President - blame the American people.

Which brings us full circle to the original premise of my question.  If 
we all had English Literature degrees what sort of foreign policy would 
we have?  Do Shakespeare anoraks make a better and more joyful world? 
If you agree, please tell me how, Dan. (or anyone)

Love and peace,
SAM SMALL

PS: Please don't answer, "entertaining the troops."

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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