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Home :: Archive :: 2007 :: June ::
That "New" Poem by Shakespeare
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0359  Thursday, 7 June 2007

[1] 	From: 	Larry Weiss <
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	Date: 	Tuesday, 15 May 2007 21:25:34 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0336 That "New" Poem by Shakespeare

[2] 	From: 	Tom Rutter <
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	Date: 	Wednesday, 16 May 2007 09:53:03 +0100
	Subj: 	RE: SHK 18.0336 That "New" Poem by Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Larry Weiss <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
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Date: 		Tuesday, 15 May 2007 21:25:34 -0400
Subject: 18.0336 That "New" Poem by Shakespeare
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0336 That "New" Poem by Shakespeare

The most obvious candidate for the play to which this epilogue was 
attached is MND, based on the fact that it shares the same verse 
structure and Puck's canonical epilogue (which is unique in the canon). 
  Jim Shapiro makes this point in "1599, A Year in the Life of William 
Shakespeare.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Tom Rutter <
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 >
Date: 		Wednesday, 16 May 2007 09:53:03 +0100
Subject: 18.0336 That "New" Poem by Shakespeare
Comment: 	RE: SHK 18.0336 That "New" Poem by Shakespeare

Sorry to respond here to an argument first printed elsewhere, but in the 
critique of Dusinberre that he appends to his post, Gabriel Egan writes:

******
'Looking for which play the epilogue was for, Dusinberre decides at this 
point to exclude as candidates certain of "the non-Shakespearian plays 
for which the Stanford epilogue might have been written" on the basis 
that we know that a couple of them (Dekker's Old Fortunatus and The 
Shoemaker's Holiday) were performed at court around new year 1599/1600, 
in which case they were probably not also performed at Shrovetide 1599. 
(They might have been, though, might they not?).'
******
The notion of plays being performed at court more than once isn't 
inherently implausible: after seeing The Merchant of Venice at court, 
James I apparently requested a second performance. And given the 
prominence of Shrove Tuesday within the play, the notion of The 
Shoemaker's/Shoemakers' Holiday being performed at Shrovetide has its 
attractions. But Henslowe lent Samuel Rowley and Thomas Downton 

 

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