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Home :: Archive :: 2007 :: June ::
Degree in Shakespeare
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 18.0416  Wednesday, 27 June 2007

[1] 	From: 	R. A. Cantrell <
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	Date: 	Monday, 25 Jun 2007 21:06:08 -0500
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0409 Degree in Shakespeare

[2] 	From: 	Larry Weiss <
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	Date: 	Monday, 25 Jun 2007 23:23:50 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0409 Degree in Shakespeare

[3] 	From: 	Lysbeth Benkert-Rasmussen <
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	Date: 	Tuesday, 26 Jun 2007 16:06:19 -0500
	Subj: 	RE: SHK 18.0409 Degree in Shakespeare

[4] 	From: 	Sam Small <
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	Date: 	Wednesday, 27 Jun 2007 12:57:36 +0100
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 18.0409 Degree in Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		R. A. Cantrell <
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Date: 		Monday, 25 Jun 2007 21:06:08 -0500
Subject: 18.0409 Degree in Shakespeare
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0409 Degree in Shakespeare

 >I often ask my students whether they think that reading King Lear will
 >make them better people.

I'm not picking on the person who offered this response, just using it 
to extend; have you (the greater you) ever asked your students if they 
thought reading Titus Andronicus would make them better people?--

All the best,
R.A. Cantrell

[Editor's Note: Regarding Titus, certainly more adventurous cooks.]

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Larry Weiss <
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Date: 		Monday, 25 Jun 2007 23:23:50 -0400
Subject: 18.0409 Degree in Shakespeare
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0409 Degree in Shakespeare

If we include among the attributes that make for a "good" person such 
things as acuity, insight, verbal facility and analytical skill, the 
answer must be at least a tentative "yes."  And if we recognize, as Sid 
Stark does, that such attributes contribute to an individual's success, 
then the answer can hardly be gainsaid.  It is perhaps such factors, 
rather than abstract notions of morality in vacuo, which explain the 
superior recidivist history of the "Shakespeare Behind Bars" 
participants.  In fairness, though, I note that another possible 
contributing factor is (as I recall from the film) that good behavior 
was a condition to participation in the program, so the program itself 
self-selected the most likely candidates to stay out of trouble.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Lysbeth Benkert-Rasmussen <
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Date: 		Tuesday, 26 Jun 2007 16:06:19 -0500
Subject: 18.0409 Degree in Shakespeare
Comment: 	RE: SHK 18.0409 Degree in Shakespeare

If you were, however, to look for anecdotal evidence to support either 
position in this debate, you might note that, while Abraham Lincoln was 
an avid reader of Shakespeare (often reading plays aloud to staff 
members and friends as a diversion), his assassin John Wilkes Booth and 
Booth's older brother were both Shakespearean actors.

The evidence does seem inconclusive. : )

Lysbeth

"Since no man has aught of what he leaves, what is't to leave betimes?"
Shakespeare

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Sam Small <
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Date: 		Wednesday, 27 Jun 2007 12:57:36 +0100
Subject: 18.0409 Degree in Shakespeare
Comment: 	Re: SHK 18.0409 Degree in Shakespeare

In a recent encounter on the current Big Brother show one 19 year old 
housemate called Brian was referred to as a Romeo.  He replied "What'd 
ya mean?"  It was explained that Romeo and Juliet was a play.  He asked 
if Romeo was a singer in a pop band called "So Solid Crew".  No, came 
the reply, Romeo was a character in a play written by Shakespeare 
hundreds of years ago.  "What's this geezer called Shakespeare who was 
around yonks ago (years ago) got to do with anything? Who is he anyway?" 
  He was later to be heard saying "If that bloke talks about museums and 
art once more I shall lose the will to live!"

I ask this list what is the future for Brian?  He clearly is very 
irritated - even aggressive when even overhearing talk of art and 
literature.   Who will take on Brian?  How much effort would it take? 
Would it be worth it?  Will Brian be a happy, balanced and mature person 
without that effort?

Troubled.

SAM SMALL

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