2008

Oaths in Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0124  Sunday, 24 February 2008

From:		Zackariah Long <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008 15:39:21 -0500
Subject:	Oaths in Shakespeare

I have a colleague in Classics who has asked me if I could point him to 
some good articles on oaths and oath-taking in Shakespeare.  I suggested 
some material influenced by Austin's idea of performative utterances, 
but he is more interested in approaching the issue from a dramaturgical 
perspective. Suggestions, anyone?  Any help would be greatly appreciated.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
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Shakespeare's Style

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0123  Sunday, 24 February 2008

[1] 	From:	Jan Hammerquist <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008 16:02:12 -0500
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0113 Shakespeare's Style

[2] 	From:	Bob Grumman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008 17:22:03 -0500
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0113 Shakespeare's Style

[3] 	From:	David Basch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Thursday, 21 Feb 2008 11:50:09 -0500
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0113 Shakespeare's Style

[4] 	From:	Jacqueline Mullender <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Thursday, 21 Feb 2008 17:47:30 +0000
	Subj:	RE: SHK 19.0113 Shakespeare's Style

[5] 	From:	Jacqueline Mullender <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Thursday, 21 Feb 2008 21:08:43 +0000
	Subj:	RE: SHK 19.0113 Shakespeare's Style


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Jan Hammerquist <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008 16:02:12 -0500
Subject: 19.0113 Shakespeare's Style
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0113 Shakespeare's Style

Language, yes, but how far will grammatical analyses take us? 
Syntactical or semantic constraints being often collaborators with a 
certain way of thinking, one should also consider language's link to 
mind, picture the level of imagination required for a Shakespeare to 
fuse sound and meaning through a sense of difference and association. 
Thus we cannot analyze from only within in a structuralist frame, but 
should also infer something of a radical sense of reality which, when 
coupled with a language mastery (something Jonson and Marlow also had, 
so linguistics isn't everything to set WS apart), creates a kind of 
conceptual music.

I would suggest Shelley's essay; some good excerpts are here: 
http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Texts/defence.html

Jan Hammerquist

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Bob Grumman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008 17:22:03 -0500
Subject: 19.0113 Shakespeare's Style
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0113 Shakespeare's Style

I guess I have to reply to this thread. I resisted because I didn't feel 
I had time to even begin saying everything I'd want to. Now, though, I'm 
just going to say one of them: to understand what makes Shakespeare a 
great poet, is easy: you simply determine what makes any poet great. Of 
course, each great poet has a unique personality that has to come 
through, and uses the tricks of the trade in different proportions, but 
basically they all do the same thing. Bardolators will not accept that, 
though. (Note: I'm speaking of traditional poetry only; it is of course, 
a new ballgame when we get into such poetries as language and visual 
poetry.)

--Bob G.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		David Basch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Thursday, 21 Feb 2008 11:50:09 -0500
Subject: 19.0113 Shakespeare's Style
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0113 Shakespeare's Style

Concerning the discussions of the use of stylometric means of 
determining authorship, I must comment that these obviously are not 
always conclusive.  For example, Donald Foster's attempt to use such 
techniques to identify a "Funeral Elegy" as authored by Shakespeare's 
turned out to be dead wrong.

Stylometry is clearly not at the diagnostic level of DNA and its use, 
effective enough to reveal a writer of the caliber of Joe Klein, should 
be taken with a grain of salt, considered of interest but not 
definitive.  Authors whose works are marked by great complexity that 
include communication through such things as tone, meaning, and wide 
allusion simply cannot be boiled down to numbers.

This seems to be the case for the use of stylometric techniques for 
identifying "A Louvers complaint" (ALC). Such methods are too mechanical 
and crude to take account of the intangibles of style and meaning for 
which only human sensibility is adequate.

I do not consider myself an expert on such stylistic things, but my 
readings of ALC make me impressed by its vocabulary, which the writer 
manages to admirably integrate into his fluid lines, a skill and 
capacity that seem worthy of a Shakespeare. Besides, the poem is 
by-lined by Shakespeare. Hence skeptics about the poet's authorship are 
impugning Thomas Thorpe's character and accepting what is only 
speculation that Shakespeare had nothing to do with this publication.

No doubt, Brian Vickers brought forward evidence of the existence in ALC 
of parallel elements in the verse lines of his proposed candidate for 
authorship. But even this must be taken with great caution since others 
have reported how many themes in the Sonnets are commentaries and 
"parodies" of the lines and themes of earlier sonneteers and no one 
claims that these others wrote the Sonnets.

David Basch

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Jacqueline Mullender <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Thursday, 21 Feb 2008 17:47:30 +0000
Subject: 19.0113 Shakespeare's Style
Comment:	RE: SHK 19.0113 Shakespeare's Style

As others have said, a complex and elusive issue, Jason. My 
fourpenn'orth would be to suggest that you look at literary stylistics - 
aka literary linguistics, as a source of potential linguistic tools. I'm 
thinking of writers such as Michael Toolan, Mick Short, Geoffrey Leech, 
Paul Simpson -once into this field you will fnd the rest through their 
bibliographies. I discovered them through a masters course in Literary 
Linguistics, which I would recommend.

Also, Shakespeare authorship studies identifies numerous specific 
features of Shakespeare's style (in order to distinguish him from his 
co-writers / collaborators), and I recommend Brian Vickers' Shakespeare 
Co-Author as an excellent survey of the field.

New work in computational stylistics is emerging all the time, 
especially in the interdisciplinary interface between linguistics and 
Shakes. studies, so keep your eyes peeled for more!

Hope this helps,
Jacquie Mullender

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Jacqueline Mullender <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Thursday, 21 Feb 2008 21:08:43 +0000
Subject: 19.0113 Shakespeare's Style
Comment:	RE: SHK 19.0113 Shakespeare's Style

A further thought: Norman Blake's (2002) book A Grammar of Shakespeare's 
Language would be a very useful addition to the toolbox for your quest, 
as might Jonathan Hope's (2003) Shakespeare's Grammar. The former gives 
some good detail on style, from a linguistic perspective.

I also recommend Vivian Salmon and Edwina Burness 'Reader in the 
Language of Shakespearean Drama' (1987) and 'Reading Shakespeare's 
Dramatic Language', edited by Adamson, Hunter, Magnusson, Thomopson and 
Wales (2001).

Jacquie Mullender

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

The Best Hamlet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0121  Sunday, 24 February 2008

[1] 	From:	Cheryl Newton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008 16:29:28 -0500
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet

[2] 	From:	John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008 22:03:39 -0000
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet

[3] 	From:	Herman Gollob <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008 23:09:58 +0000
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet

[4] 	From:	Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008 23:35:16 -0500
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet

[5] 	From:	David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Thursday, 21 Feb 2008 09:16:32 -0000
	Subj:	RE: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet

[6] 	From:	Tom Reedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Thursday, 21 Feb 2008 10:32:55 -0600 (CST)
	Subj:	Re: The Best Hamlet

[7] 	From:	Robert Projansky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Saturday, 23 Feb 2008 01:54:35 -0800
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Cheryl Newton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008 16:29:28 -0500
Subject: 19.0114 The Best Hamlet
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet

Campbell Scott, hands down. He also co-directs; the cast includes Jamey 
Sheridan, John Benjamin Hickey, and Lisa Gaye Hamilton. Approx running 
time 3 hrs.

Close second "Hamlet by Brook," starring Adrian Lester. It's a tight 
cut, 132 minutes.

Both are unusual in having multiracial casts. In Scott's production, 
Polonius & family are black. In Brook's production, Hamlet, father, 
Claudius are black. Ophelia & family are east Indian. Gertrude is Anglo, 
& Horatio is the whitest white boy you'll ever see. I think it was set 
up as a deliberate visual contrast with Hamlet. They do play the parts 
with physical affection that is withheld from R&G.

(Want a review of the manga Hamlet?!)

Cheryl Newton

Except for the actor's name, I would've insisted from appearance that 
Laertes was Hispanic/Native Am

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008 22:03:39 -0000
Subject: 19.0114 The Best Hamlet
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet

Peter Bridgman wrote:

 >Of Benedict Nightingale's top 10 Hamlets, Mark Rylance and Alex
 >Jennings were both 40 when they played the part, Simon Russell Beale
 >was 39, Stephen Dillane was 38, Michael Pennington was 37, Samuel
 >West was 35, Jonathan Pryce was 34, Ben Kingsley and Ralph Fiennes
 >were both 33, and Kenneth Branagh was 32.
 >
 >I expect the Wittenberg course was post-grad.

And Richard Burbage was 32, of course.

John Briggs

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Herman Gollob <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008 23:09:58 +0000
Subject: 19.0114 The Best Hamlet
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet

Jacobi's Hamlet on BBC-DVD is splendid, second only to Rylance's. I was 
lucky enough to see his performance at the Globe in 2000; the production 
itself was up to that time the most thrilling rendition of any 
Shakespearean drama I'd seen (I wrote about it extensively in ME AND 
SHAKESPEARE; Adventures with the Bard). But Patrick Stewart's MACBETH 
matched it in theatrical power and inventiveness, including the most 
ingenious staging of the Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow soliloquy 
one can imagine.

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008 23:35:16 -0500
Subject: 19.0114 The Best Hamlet
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet

What about Richard Burbage, who was 32 in 1600 and is said to have 
weighed 16 stn. Of the modern actors, Simon Russell Beale comes closest.

By the way, the latter actor's last name is "Russell Beale," not "Beale."

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Thursday, 21 Feb 2008 09:16:32 -0000
Subject: 19.0114 The Best Hamlet
Comment:	RE: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet

Surprising, perhaps, that David Warner's Hamlet hasn't been mentioned? 
It certainly hit the spot with this, then teenaged, member of the 
audience - but perhaps that's also the problem with it?

David Lindley

[6]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Tom Reedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Thursday, 21 Feb 2008 10:32:55 -0600 (CST)
Subject:	Re: The Best Hamlet

Am I the only one who saw Campbell Scott's 2001 Hallmark Hall of Fame TV 
production of Hamlet? I think his interpretation much superior to any of 
the others named that I've seen.

Tom Reedy

[7]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Robert Projansky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Saturday, 23 Feb 2008 01:54:35 -0800
Subject: 19.0114 The Best Hamlet
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet

The only British actors I have seen play Hamlet have all been on film or 
video, so I have no idea whose is best, but I do know whose is the 
worst. I cannot imagine anyone recording or sitting through, beginning 
to end, a worse performance than Nicol Williamson's. After a very few 
minutes you want to see his head off, no shriving time allowed. Ugh.

Best to all,
Bob Projansky

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Conference: SHK 19.0122 Sunday, 24 February 2008

  
	[1] 	From:	Nicholas Clary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
		Date:	Wednesday, 20 Feb
 2008 14:25:58 -0500
		Subj:	RE: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet 
	
	[2] 	From:
 Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
		Date:	Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008 14:52:29
 -0500
		Subj:	RE: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet 
	
	[3] 	From:	Paul E. Doniger
 <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
		Date:	Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008 19:09:51 -0800 (PST)

 	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet 
	
	
	[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

 From:		Nicholas Clary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:		Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008
 14:25:58 -0500
	Subject:	RE: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet
	
	I'd like to
 weigh in on the side of Jacobi as Hamlet. I saw both Rylance and Dillane
 in performances, and approved of both renditions, given the particular concepts
 embraced by their directors. I have also seen the filmed performances nominated.
 Still and all, Jacobi's Hamlet is my favorite.
	
	Nick Clary
	
	[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------

 From:		Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:		Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008 14:52:29
 -0500
	Subject:	RE: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet
	
	No votes for Richard
 Burton's rehearsal dress Hamlet? My very first live theater Hamlet and still
 my most cherished.
	
	[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------

 From:		Paul E. Doniger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:		Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008
 19:09:51 -0800 (PST)
	Subject:	Re: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet
	
	I agree
 with Mark Alexander and Charles Weinstein regarding Derek Jacobi's Hamlet.
 It's one of the most intelligent I've seen. I also agree that Ralph Feinnes
 and Kenneth Branagh don't belong on anyone's top ten (I don't understand
 how the Feinnes Hamlet won a Tony! I've expressed my dislike for Branagh
 on this list in the past). To the list of unsupportable choices, I would
 add the Ethan Hawke, which I thought was awful. As a youth, I saw Richard
 Burton's Hamlet and was greatly affected by it-the video doesn't come close
 to doing it justice. Someone had earlier mentioned Kevin Kline's Hamlet,
 but I find it somewhat dull.
	
	I heard years ago that Peter O'Toole was
 a great Hamlet (with, I believe, Derek Jacobi as Laertes), but that was second
 hand information-does anyone have any first-hand experience with that one?
 Also, while my memory holds, the Christopher Plummer "Hamlet at Elsinore"
 in the mid 1960s was impressive-and Robert Shaw was one of the best Claudiuses
 I can remember. I'd like to get a DVD of that one if it ever comes out.

 
	Paul E. Doniger
	
	_______________________________________________________________

 S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
	Hardy M. Cook,
 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
	The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

 
	DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions
 expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes
 no responsibility for them.
	
	SHK 19.0122  The Best Hamlet 
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit


The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0122  Sunday, 24 February 2008

[1] 	From:	Nicholas Clary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008 14:25:58 -0500
	Subj:	RE: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet

[2] 	From:	Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008 14:52:29 -0500
	Subj:	RE: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet

[3] 	From:	Paul E. Doniger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008 19:09:51 -0800 (PST)
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Nicholas Clary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008 14:25:58 -0500
Subject: 19.0114 The Best Hamlet
Comment:	RE: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet

I'd like to weigh in on the side of Jacobi as Hamlet. I saw both Rylance 
and Dillane in performances, and approved of both renditions, given the 
particular concepts embraced by their directors. I have also seen the 
filmed performances nominated. Still and all, Jacobi's Hamlet is my 
favorite.

Nick Clary

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008 14:52:29 -0500
Subject: 19.0114 The Best Hamlet
Comment:	RE: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet

No votes for Richard Burton's rehearsal dress Hamlet? My very first live 
theater Hamlet and still my most cherished.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Paul E. Doniger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 20 Feb 2008 19:09:51 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 19.0114 The Best Hamlet
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0114 The Best Hamlet

I agree with Mark Alexander and Charles Weinstein regarding Derek 
Jacobi's Hamlet. It's one of the most intelligent I've seen. I also 
agree that Ralph Feinnes and Kenneth Branagh don't belong on anyone's 
top ten (I don't understand how the Feinnes Hamlet won a Tony! I've 
expressed my dislike for Branagh on this list in the past). To the list 
of unsupportable choices, I would add the Ethan Hawke, which I thought 
was awful. As a youth, I saw Richard Burton's Hamlet and was greatly 
affected by it-the video doesn't come close to doing it justice. Someone 
had earlier mentioned Kevin Kline's Hamlet, but I find it somewhat dull.

I heard years ago that Peter O'Toole was a great Hamlet (with, I 
believe, Derek Jacobi as Laertes), but that was second hand 
information-does anyone have any first-hand experience with that one? 
Also, while my memory holds, the Christopher Plummer "Hamlet at 
Elsinore" in the mid 1960s was impressive-and Robert Shaw was one of the 
best Claudiuses I can remember. I'd like to get a DVD of that one if it 
ever comes out.

Paul E. Doniger

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

CFP: Shakespeare's Mardi Gras

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0120  Sunday, 24 February 2008

From:		Alison Graham-Bertolini <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Friday, 22 Feb 2008 14:46:25 -0600
Subject:	Shakespeare's Mardi Gras, CFP

Shakespeare's Mardi Gras,
The Inaugural Conference of The Louisiana Shakespeare Project,
Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, October 10-11, 2008

FEATURED SPEAKERS INCLUDE
Phebe Jensen
Utah State University
Religion and Revelry in Shakespeare's Festive World

Christopher Kendrick
Loyola University Chicago
Utopia, Carnival, and Commonwealth in Renaissance England


Richard Rambuss
Emory University
Closet Devotions

CALL FOR PAPERS

Proposals for twenty-minute papers on Shakespeare, carnival, and early 
modern culture are invited. Potential topics might include:
* Reconsiderations of the work of Bakhtin, C. L. Barber, and other 
classic theorists of carnival
* Shakespeare, performance, and carnival
* Shakespeare, film, and carnival
* Ritual, theatre, and carnival
* Gender and festive culture
* Finding carnival in all the wrong places: sermons, religious polemic, 
murder pamphlets, etc.
* Late medieval carnival and transitions into the Renaissance
* Reformation and carnival (or the Reformation and Lent)

300-word abstracts must be received by March 28. Send to: Alison 
Graham-Bertolini, Department of English, Louisiana State University, 
Baton Rouge, LA 70803, or by e-mail to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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