2008

Reopening of Shakespeare Centre Library and Archive

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0034  Wednesday, 17 January 2008

From:		Sylvia Morris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Friday, 18 Jan 2008 21:32:57 -0000
Subject:	Reopening of Shakespeare Centre Library and Archive

I am pleased to announce that the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust's Library 
and Archive service in Stratford-upon-Avon has reopened.

The SBT holds wide-ranging collections of research material, and over 
the past few months the Shakespeare and Local collections have merged 
into a single reading room with joint staffing, which will strengthen 
the Trust's position as both the most important holder of Shakespeare 
material in the UK and a major resource for the history of Stratford and 
south Warwickshire in their local and national contexts. The Shakespeare 
Collections of the SBT and RSC were awarded Designated status in 2005, 
recognising their national and international importance. This combined 
service is now the Shakespeare Centre Library and Archive. Part of the 
SBT's reorganised Learning Department, it is reached via the doors next 
to the visitors' entrance to Shakespeare's Birthplace.

As part of the aim of improving access to the Royal Shakespeare 
Company's archives, all the RSC Theatre Records cuttings volumes are on 
open shelves, and up to date production images of RSC shows are 
available through four workstations as part of the joint RSC/SBT image 
management system.  Video and DVD viewing spaces are included. 2500 
extra volumes of Shakespeare criticism and indexes to the extensive 
collections of Shakespeare-related pictures and playbills are publicly 
available for the first time. Access to electronic resources such as the 
World Shakespeare Bibliography has also been widened.

Opening hours are 10-5 Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, 10-7 on 
Wednesday, and 9.30-12.30 on Saturdays. Booking in advance is essential 
for videos and is advised for other materials. For more information see 
www.shakespeare.org.uk.

We look forward to welcoming readers old and new. There is no charge to 
join and all you have to do is bring some ID such as student card, 
passport or driving licence.

Sylvia Morris
Head of Shakespeare Collections
Shakespeare Birthplace Trust

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

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Soliloquies - Truth or Lie...or Overheard

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0033  Thursday, 17 January 2008

[1] 	From:	Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 16 Jan 2008 13:39:18 -0500
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0028 Soliloquies - Truth or Lie...or Overheard

[2] 	From:	Scott Shepherd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 16 Jan 2008 13:51:30 -0500
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0028 Soliloquies - Truth or Lie...or Overheard


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 16 Jan 2008 13:39:18 -0500
Subject: 19.0028 Soliloquies - Truth or Lie...or Overheard
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0028 Soliloquies - Truth or Lie...or Overheard

Tony Burton is surely correct when he says that the text offers "a menu 
of performable juicy choices," but to distinguish that from "ambiguity 
and confusion" invites the question of whether there is a difference 
between those two formulations beyond the obvious rhetorical one -- 
"juicy choices," good; "ambiguity and confusion," bad.

Putting the semantic quibble to the side, Tony has offered one possible 
choice, depending on Hamlet's unexpressed deduction from all the 
circumstances that he is being overheard. Scott Shepherd offers another 
alternative, down to the manner in which the returned gifts are wrapped. 
Both, I suppose, can be presented on stage with varying degrees of 
cogency; but as I think that Tony, at least, will acknowledge, neither 
is compelled by the text.

In fairness, I do not claim that my interpretation is absolutely 
compulsory either or, indeed, that it is the only plausible answer. My 
more modest claim is that it is the best answer that has yet been 
advanced. It has the advantage of being supported by two short 
consecutive speeches ("For to the noble mind ..." and "Ha ha! Are you 
honest?") which the actors can easily perform in a fashion which 
instantaneously suggests that Ophelia was coached and Hamlet recognizes 
that. Tony's interpretation, on the other hand, requires the audience to 
recall a galaxy of details and reach the conclusion that Hamlet also has 
reached the same deduction without the benefit of a speech saying so. 
Scott's interpretation is even worse in that it requires the director to 
employ stage business and props that are nowhere hinted at in the text. 
The director may choose to do that; but that is his choice, not 
Shakespeare's.

Don Bloom is also on to something when he suggests that interpretations 
may be informed by the background and cultural biases of the critic, and 
he cites Merchant of Venice as the obvious example. In this case, 
however, diligent self analysis has failed to identify anything in my 
background which can be said to have influenced my solution, except a 
native tendency towards logic and reason, and professional experience in 
construing words and drawing conclusions from the statements and actions 
of others.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Scott Shepherd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 16 Jan 2008 13:51:30 -0500
Subject: 19.0028 Soliloquies - Truth or Lie...or Overheard
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0028 Soliloquies - Truth or Lie...or Overheard

I sympathize with Don Bloom's impatience, even if it is expressed rather 
ad hominem. But I do think the topic is interesting and textually 
arguable, and worth a bit of a fight because the standard interpolation 
has become so entrenched and so radically alters the meanings of the scene.

_______________________________________________________________
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The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
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Malvolio and the Captain

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0031  Thursday, 17 January 2008

[1] 	From:	Jeremy Fiebig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 16 Jan 2008 09:10:42 -0600
	Subj:	RE: SHK 19.0019 Malvolio and the Captain

[2] 	From:	Steve Sohmer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 16 Jan 2008 14:57:40 EST
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0019 Malvolio and the Captain

[3] 	From:	Donald Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Thursday, 17 Jan 2008 09:00:54 -0600
	Subj:	RE: SHK 19.0019 Malvolio and the Captain


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Jeremy Fiebig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 16 Jan 2008 09:10:42 -0600
Subject: 19.0019 Malvolio and the Captain
Comment:	RE: SHK 19.0019 Malvolio and the Captain

I recently employed the doubling of the Captain and Malvolio in a 
production of Twelfth Night at my college. I wonder if the "joke" for 
Globe patrons might have been the doubling itself: the captain cannot 
come because the actor playing him is preoccupied with playing Malvolio.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Steve Sohmer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 16 Jan 2008 14:57:40 EST
Subject: 19.0019 Malvolio and the Captain
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0019 Malvolio and the Captain

Dear Friends,

St. Paul wrote to the Illyrians twice and visited them three times ... 
because the idolatrous Corinthians were having difficulty adapting  to 
his brand of Christianity. Let me enumerate some of the problems Paul 
addressed. Apparently, these were still rampant in Shakespeare's 
Illyria. There were divisions and factionalism between households (1 Cor 
1:11)-and within households. Stewards were on the verge of becoming 
unfaithful (4:1-2). Servants were seized with ambition (7:20) and 
bridling at their low station (7:21). There was fornication (5:1)-and 
raillery and drunkenness (10:21, 11:21). Unmarried Corinthian women were 
refusing to marry (8:28ff). The men had become haughty; to use Paul's 
phrase, "puffed up" (4:18)-that's Malvolio's condition-as Fabian 
observes, "see how imagination blows him" (2.5.40-1). Some Corinthians 
were speaking in strange and undecipherable tongues (14)-as do Feste, 
Toby, and Andrew. Caritas was in decline, and the collecting of alms had 
lapsed (16). Paul also reprimanded the Illyrians for bringing lawsuits 
against each other in pagan courts (6:1-6). Doesn't this explain 
Shakespeare's sudden and inexplicable allusion to Malvolio's lawsuit 
against Viola's loyal captain?

Hope this helps,
Steve

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Donald Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Thursday, 17 Jan 2008 09:00:54 -0600
Subject: 19.0019 Malvolio and the Captain
Comment:	RE: SHK 19.0019 Malvolio and the Captain

Cary Barney writes:

 >I recently directed "Twelfth Night" for my university and we grappled
 >with the mysterious fifth act revelation that the Captain is being held
 >under arrest at Malvolio's instigation. Rather than have it come out of
 >the blue, we took the liberty of adding a dumb show in which the Captain
 >tries on Viola's "women's weeds" out of curiosity and Malvolio has him
 >arrested for cross dressing in public. Dubious, but it worked, at least
 >in the context of our production. I'm wondering if anyone knows of other
 >productions which have addressed this loose end in any way.

I certainly hope not, at least if this is exemplary. I can find no 
authority for this in the slightest. Why should Malvolio care what a sea 
captain does in his spare time? How would he find out? He has no 
authority outside the countess's household and less there than he 
thinks. Although he has some views in common with Angelo, he lacks the 
means to enforce them on much of anybody.

Second, there is no suggestion that cross-dressing is a crime in 
Illyria. Viola never says that she's in peril of arrest for what she's 
up to.

Third, this all smacks of voyeurism and a desire to be up to date. 
"We're going to show male cross-dressing, te-hee."

Granted, the line is a problem, but it is far more likely that a man 
would be arrested for debt, especially if he fell afoul of usurious 
loan-sharks, of whom it is easy to imagine Malvolio being one. However, 
it is not very important and I don't think that anybody really cares 
what the issue might have been between the captain and Malvolio.

I hate to be so harsh, but students are impressionable. Some of them 
might think this idea had something to do with Shakespeare's play.

don

_______________________________________________________________
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
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Richard III Novel?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0032  Thursday, 17 January 2008

[1] 	From:	Matthew Henerson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 16 Jan 2008 07:19:08 -0800
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0018 Richard III Novel?

[2] 	From:	Martin Mueller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 16 Jan 2008 09:35:50 -0600
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0018 Richard III Novel?

[3] 	From:	Katy Stavreva <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 16 Jan 2008 10:13:13 -0600
	Subj:	RE: SHK 19.0018 Richard III Novel?

[4] 	From:	Jennifer Pierce <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 16 Jan 2008 13:04:38 -0500
	Subj:	RE: SHK 19.0018 Richard III Novel?

[5] 	From:	Joe Wagner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 16 Jan 2008 21:58:51 -0500
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0018 Richard III Novel?

[6] 	From:	Anne Cuneo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Thursday, 17 Jan 2008 07:27:21 +0100
	Subj:	SHK 19008 Richard III novel

[7] 	From:	Arthur Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Thursday, 17 Jan 2008 09:56:47 +0000
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0018 Richard III Novel?

[8] 	From:	Kelly Rivers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Thursday, 17 Jan 2008 06:46:42 -0800 (PST)
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0018 Richard III Novel?


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Matthew Henerson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 16 Jan 2008 07:19:08 -0800
Subject: 19.0018 Richard III Novel?
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0018 Richard III Novel?

This is a bit off-kilter, but *Richard III *has always put me in mind of 
*Vanity Fair.* Social ambitions rather than political, but an equally 
ruthless, and correspondingly disadvantaged protagonist, and God knows 
it is a weighty brute.

Matt Henerson

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Martin Mueller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 16 Jan 2008 09:35:50 -0600
Subject: 19.0018 Richard III Novel?
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0018 Richard III Novel?

There is always Josephine Tey's Daughter of Time. Not exactly a 
"weighty" or "classic" novel, but a novel that has its own take on 
ambition and the distortions to which it leads.

MM

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Katy Stavreva <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 16 Jan 2008 10:13:13 -0600
Subject: 19.0018 Richard III Novel?
Comment:	RE: SHK 19.0018 Richard III Novel?

How about Alexander Dumas' _La Reigne Margot_? It's bursting at the 
seams with characters driven by political ambition. And it teaches 
wonderfully!

Katy Stavreva

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Jennifer Pierce <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 16 Jan 2008 13:04:38 -0500
Subject: 19.0018 Richard III Novel?
Comment:	RE: SHK 19.0018 Richard III Novel?

Machiavelli's _The Prince_ seems about right.

Jennifer Pierce

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Joe Wagner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 16 Jan 2008 21:58:51 -0500
Subject: 19.0018 Richard III Novel?
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0018 Richard III Novel?

You might try "The Sunne in Splendour: A Novel of Richard III" by Sharon 
Kay Penman--it's a compelling read that offers a very different spin on 
Richard.

Joe Wagner
Kent State University
(Emeritus)

[6]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Anne Cuneo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Thursday, 17 Jan 2008 07:27:21 +0100
Subject: Richard III novel
Comment:	SHK 19008 Richard III novel

I would recommend anyone of the Balzac novels, from "Le Pere Goriot" on. 
And Stendhal's "La chartreuse de Parme".

Sorry for not knowing the English titles, but you will no doubt be 
familiar with them. Reading Balzac made me understand what makes 
ambitious (and sometimes unscrupulous) politicians tick.

There is of course "All the President's Men", which focuses on the 
ambitious politician's downfall, but perhaps that does not rate as a 
classical novel...

Friendly greetings,
Anne Cuneo

[7]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Arthur Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Thursday, 17 Jan 2008 09:56:47 +0000
Subject: 19.0018 Richard III Novel?
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0018 Richard III Novel?

My immediate and somewhat puzzled response is that I can think of an 
extraordinary number of plays, as early as *Antigone*, as late as David 
Hare's *Stuff Happens,* that would fit, but very few major novels. (No 
doubt I'm forgetting something obvious.)  If the link were tyranny 
rather than ambition, I would suggest *Emma* or *Mansfield Park.* Both 
books are centrally concerned with misrule and right rule. Frank 
Churchill and Henry Crawford-actors, manipulators, seducers, petty 
tyrants-both bear significant resemblances to Richard but specifically 
lack the political ambition that might go with their rank.

Of course, if this is *the *Ken Adelman, he might have a particularly 
interesting perspective on *Stuff Happens.*

Regards,
Arthur Lindley

[8]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Kelly Rivers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Thursday, 17 Jan 2008 06:46:42 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 19.0018 Richard III Novel?
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0018 Richard III Novel?

What about Machiavelli's _The Prince_? It's not really a novel, but it 
covers political discourse in such a way that it would inform any 
reading of RII.

Kelly Rivers

_______________________________________________________________
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
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CFP: Shakespeare and Discourse Stylistics

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0030  Thursday, 17 January 2008

From:		Lene Petersen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 16 Jan 2008 17:22:14 +0100 (GMT+01:00)
Subject:	Call for papers: Esse-9 Conference, Seminar 20: Shakespeare and 
Discourse Stylistics

ESSE 9 conference - Aarhus, Denmark, 22-26 August 2008: Seminar 20:
Shakespeare and Discourse Stylistics.

The next ESSE conference will be held at the University of Aarhus, 
Denmark, from 22 to 26 August 2008. We invite papers for seminar 20 on 
'Shakespeare and Discourse Stylistics'

Panel Abstract:
 From copia to stylistic reticence, Shakespeare's playtexts map out the 
extreme limits and impasse of verbal communication. The present seminar 
aims at assessing and highlighting the discourse strategies and 
structures at stake in conversational exchange and interaction in the 
very process of capturing the world of human understanding and 
relationships. Such a process involves the difficulty, sometimes the 
impossibility, and the exhilaration of mediating that world through 
language. Shakespeare's playtexts should be envisaged as being rooted in 
a cultural and rhetorical context in which meaning (and the difficulties 
of conveying meaning) is a collaborative construction, involving author, 
text, culture, and reader. Papers are welcome on the range of 
Shakespeare's negotiations with the problematics of the production of 
meaning. Areas of exploration include textual stylistics, semantics, 
pragmatics, and semiotics.

Contact details for Panel 20:

Dr. Mireille Ravassat (University of Valenciennes, France)
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dr. Lene Petersen (University of the West of England, Bristol, UK)
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Those wishing to participate in seminar are invited to submit 200-word 
abstracts of their proposed papers directly to both convenors of the 
seminar in question before 1 March 2008. The convenors will let the 
proponents know whether their proposals have been accepted no later than 
21 March 2008.

For more details, see the conference website: 
http://www.esse2008.dk/cfp_seminars.html

There is a general conference website at http://www.esse2008.dk/

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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