2008

The Best Hamlet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0173  Thursday, 13 March 2008

[1] 	From:	Paul Budra <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Tuesday, 11 Mar 2008 13:14:56 -0700
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0161 The Best Hamlet

[2] 	From:	Marilyn A. Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Tuesday, 11 Mar 2008 18:46:17 -0400
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0150 The Best Hamlet


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Paul Budra <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Tuesday, 11 Mar 2008 13:14:56 -0700
Subject: 19.0161 The Best Hamlet
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0161 The Best Hamlet

The best Hamlet I ever saw was a theatre at Langara College in Vancouver 
BC. Langara College has what is arguably the best theatre program in 
Canada (Studio 58), and I try to attend its performances whenever I can.

Anyway, this student cast was headed by Kyle Rideout, who has gone on to 
be a regular in Vancouver's summer Shakespeare festival, Bard on the 
Beach. Rideout is a slight man, almost elfin man. In this modern day 
production he wore a tight, black suit and spiky hair, giving him a punk 
look - think Johnny Rotten without the safety pins. The entire 
production was intelligent and ingenious, but Rideout was a knock-out. 
His delivery of the "to be or not to be" speech was simply the best I 
have ever heard. He delivered it while walking through the audience, 
pausing over the cruces of the speech as though he were are once 
teaching us its lessons and trying to work out the implications of where 
his mind was taking him. He knew when to be funny, and his camaraderie 
with Horatio felt just right.

Anyway, I thought I was mad to be so impressed with a student 
performance, but another colleague of mine who has seen the production 
asked me about it. When I replied, "Best Hamlet I've seen," she said, 
"Thank goodness you said that. I thought I was crazy, because it's the 
best I've ever seen."

Paul Budra
Associate Professor
Simon Fraser University

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Marilyn A. Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Tuesday, 11 Mar 2008 18:46:17 -0400
Subject: 19.0150 The Best Hamlet
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0150 The Best Hamlet

Considering that I named Stacy Keach as one of my most powerful Hamlet 
experiences, I found the following quite listed on Mr. Keach's website 
most interesting:

"... of American Hamlets? I was too young to have seen Barrymore, but I 
suppose the three most notable American Hamlets since have been Stacy 
Keach, Kevin Kline and Sam Waterson. Kline was an athletic 
soldier-prince, a sort of Henry V with doubts, while Waterson suggested 
a scholar whose resolution was 'sicklied o'er with the pale cast of 
thought.' But for me, the best of that bunch was Keach, whose neurotic 
passion and fierce poetry were quite wonderful."

Clive Barnes, New York Post, Sunday Dec 26, 1999 "

Having seen Mr. Waterson live on stage in both a comic and a tragic mode 
(albeit not Shakespearean) I rather wish I had seen his performance to 
compare it.

Mari Bonomi

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 >

Sonnets Performed

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0172  Thursday, 13 March 2008

[1] 	From:	Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Tuesday, 11 Mar 2008 16:29:25 -0400 (EDT)
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0158 Sonnets Performed

[2] 	From:	Olwen Terris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 12 Mar 2008 09:07:20 -0000
	Subj:	RE: SHK 19.0167 Sonnets Performed


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Tanya Gough <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Tuesday, 11 Mar 2008 16:29:25 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 19.0158 Sonnets Performed
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0158 Sonnets Performed

Derek Jarman did an 80 minute film piece based on the sonnets, called 
The Angelic Conversation, narrated by Judi Dench, back in 1985. I 
believe it's still out of print, but there were video copies available 
as of our 2003 catalogue, so you might be able to e-bay a copy in decent 
shape.

Tanya "A lass" Gough

PS. Will miss you all at SAA.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Olwen Terris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 12 Mar 2008 09:07:20 -0000
Subject: 19.0167 Sonnets Performed
Comment:	RE: SHK 19.0167 Sonnets Performed

Simon Callow read the Sonnets on BBC's Radio 3 in April 1994 following 
the re-ordering of John Padel. Callow read them daily for 15 minutes 
over 6 days and these broadcasts may be listened to at the British 
Library Sound Archive. Simon Callow also reads the Sonnets in the Poets 
for Pleasure series issued by Hodder Headline Audio - released in 1995, 
these two recordings can be bought through Amazon.

Olwen Terris
Shakespeare Project
British Universities Film & Video Council
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

_______________________________________________________________
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
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A Pedagogical Question

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0170  Thursday, 13 March 2008

[1] 	From:	David Frankel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Tuesday, 11 Mar 2008 16:24:52 -0400
	Subj:	RE: SHK 19.0163 A Pedagogical Question

[2] 	From:	V. Kerry Inman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 12 Mar 2008 13:35:54 -0400
	Subj:	RE: SHK 19.0163 A Pedagogical Question

[3] 	From:	Joseph Egert <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 12 Mar 2008 11:35:13 -0700 (PDT)
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0163 A Pedagogical Question


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		David Frankel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Tuesday, 11 Mar 2008 16:24:52 -0400
Subject: 19.0163 A Pedagogical Question
Comment:	RE: SHK 19.0163 A Pedagogical Question

One thing that you might do, as it focuses on the possibilities inherent 
in a play, is to show the St. Crispin's Day speech from Olivier's and 
Branagh's films and have the students discuss the similarities and 
differences. Then, to further push the point that the choices actors and 
directors make create meanings beyond, parallel, or against the literal 
meaning of the words, show the brief scene from the movie Renaissance 
Man in which one of the trainee soldiers recites part of the speech.

C. David Frankel
Assistant Director of Theatre
School of Theatre and Dance
University of South Florida

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		V. Kerry Inman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 12 Mar 2008 13:35:54 -0400
Subject: 19.0163 A Pedagogical Question
Comment:	RE: SHK 19.0163 A Pedagogical Question

How could you not include a discussion of Shakespeare's very right-wing 
views on the monarchy, justification for war, and governmental 
responsibility? Also his more liberal, perhaps, view on women's rights, 
vis a vis the contrast of women in monarchical successions in France and 
England.

V. Kerry Inman

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Joseph Egert <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 12 Mar 2008 11:35:13 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 19.0163 A Pedagogical Question
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0163 A Pedagogical Question

Jack Heller asks: "What do you teach when you teach HENRY V in a survey 
of Shakespeare's plays?"

ANSWER: The bloody self-serving sanctimony of elites, both rulers and 
wannabees, then and now.

Joe Egert

"Every Caesar has his Brutus without, and every Brutus his Caesar 
within." (Apostle of Darkness, 2008)

_______________________________________________________________
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The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

EMLS 13.3 Now Available

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0171  Thursday, 13 March 2008

[1] 	From:	Judi Crane <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 12 Mar 2008 13:12:56 +1100
	Subj:	RE: SHK 19.0165 EMLS 13.3 Now Available

[2] 	From:	Donald Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 12 Mar 2008 07:58:07 -0500
	Subj:	RE: SHK 19.0165 EMLS 13.3 Now Available


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Judi Crane <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 12 Mar 2008 13:12:56 +1100
Subject: 19.0165 EMLS 13.3 Now Available
Comment:	RE: SHK 19.0165 EMLS 13.3 Now Available

Precisely what does Nicole mean by 'Catholically-aligned'? Charles and 
his Archbishop of Canterbury, William Laud, both embraced what later 
became known as Anglo-Catholic or High Church practices and dogma, so 
may be thus described. Both were executed for treason, and the charges 
included endangering the Protestant faith. Charles 1's sons and eventual 
successors were both Roman Catholics, so their father could hardly be 
'the last... in English history'. Charles formally embraced the faith on 
his deathbed, but his younger brother and successor was a baptised and 
practicing Catholic. He was the last Roman Catholic king of England. The 
eventual birth of a son to him and his (Catholic) second wife raised 
fears of an eventual Catholic succession, and was a significant factor 
in his removal in The Glorious Revolution of 1688.  By Act of 
Parliament, the monarch may not be a Roman Catholic, marry a Roman 
Catholic or bring his/her children up as Catholics. Any member of the 
royal family who marries a Catholic loses his/her place in the 
succession, however children of that union retain their rights, provided 
that they are baptised and raised as Anglicans. Anglicanism is described 
as a 'broad church', and encompasses a wide range of practices, from Low 
Church evangelicalism to High Church/ Anglo-Catholic ritual. All 
Anglicans, from the monarch down are free to choose their preferred 
'brand'. I suspect EII favours a moderate form of worship and practice - 
neither too High nor too Low, but she is quite free to adopt 
Anglo-Catholic practices should she so wish.

Cheers,
Judi Crane
Australian National University

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Donald Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 12 Mar 2008 07:58:07 -0500
Subject: 19.0165 EMLS 13.3 Now Available
Comment:	RE: SHK 19.0165 EMLS 13.3 Now Available

Not wanting to be fussy, but when Nicole Coonradt calls Charles I "the 
last Catholically-aligned monarch in English history," she seems to be 
ignoring his sons, one of whom reputedly remained a secret catholic all 
his life and the other of whom lost his crown (though not the head 
inside it) over his obstinacy.

Cheers,
don

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

American and English Eyes

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0169  Thursday, 13 March 2008

From:		Sam Small <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Thursday, 13 Mar 2008 15:15:44 -0000
Subject:	American and English Eyes

As an Englishman who thinks of himself as culturally 100% American, I 
have tried to fathom the difference in social sensibilities between the 
two countries when considering the great plays of Shakespeare. America 
was founded on the sweat, blood and tears of the unlettered working 
classes of Europe. Later banks and other corporations exploited this 
amazing achievement. To this day there is fond deference to any working 
class origin when expressed by most middle or upper class Americans.

In England it is the exact opposite. The Norman invasion, the foundation 
of the modern English state, murdered and exiled the rightful English 
ruling class. The English working classes were losers and were deeply 
ashamed of their rout. They have never recovered. In time the French 
aristocracy became the British gentry creating the industrial revolution 
and social disaster.  To this day there is fond deference to any 
aristocratic origin when expressed by most working or middle classes 
from the UK.

Given the surprising differences between the two histories are there 
distinctive American or English views of the plays? Is Othello, Richard 
III, Henry V or Macbeth viewed more sympathetically on one side of the 
pond or the other? Or any differences?

Clearly there is the unfortunate "Archers syndrome" in most of 
Shakespeare plays. That is, royalty and the middle classes are often 
intelligent, chase love, are taller, often gullible with little humour. 
The working classes are often dim, chase sex, are shorter, often very 
cunning and given to much wise cracking.

So how do Americans view this? Is it foreign to them? Or English quaint?

Stars and Stripes forever

SAM SMALL

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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