2008

CFP: Wartime Shakespeare in a Global Context

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0153  Monday, 10 March 2008

From:		Irene R. Makaryk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Friday, 7 Mar 2008 15:12:15 -0500
Subject:	CFP: Wartime Shakespeare in a Global Context

CALL FOR PAPERS
Wartime Shakespeare in a Global Context/
Shakespeare au temps de la guerre

University of Ottawa
September 19-21, 2009

Fought on every continent except Antarctica, the Second World War offers 
a unique, temporally limited but geographically inclusive period in 
which to analyse and probe the role and significance of the theatre in 
times of extreme social duress. As the most frequently performed and 
translated playwright in the world, Shakespeare is arguably one of the 
most useful touchstones for examining a range of issues and questions 
brought to the fore during wartime which this international conference 
-- coinciding with the 70th anniversary of the declaration of war --- 
aims to address:

What can the classics and, more broadly, theatre offer people suffering 
under the horrific conditions of war?

How does culture (both as an anthropological and as an aesthetic 
concept) change in wartime?

Are some aesthetic genres and modes more conducive than others in such a 
period?

How effective is the imposition from "above" of aesthetic criteria or of 
particular works?

How do ordinarily benign artistic productions suddenly become usable, 
even necessary, as political propaganda?

How are claims about the universality of authors revised or revisited in 
wartime when special pressures and demands are placed on literary and 
dramatic work?

How are issues of character and poetic language dealt with in 
circumstances which require collective, not individualistic, thought?

What kind of relationship develops between "world classics" and 
indigenous canons of theatre and literature in wartime?

How do issues of gender, class, or political formation play into these 
debates? Post-colonialism? Translation? Adaptation?

How do terms like "high" and "low" art function in wartime?

In periods of post-war reconstruction?

Where does the issue of globalization fit?

Do answers to any of these questions about the Second World War still 
hold true today?

To date, the role of the theatre during the Second World War has neither 
been carefully documented nor subjected to a thorough analysis, despite 
the fact that from the very beginning of the war live theatrical 
performance was identified as contributing in a central way to the war 
effort. Shakespeare's stock was low in 1939; yet, by war's end, 
Shakespeare became a dominant cultural force that both ignited an 
explosion--still unabated--of scholarship, professional organizations, 
Shakespeare festivals, and popular cultural uses, and that marked a 
major shift in cultural practices.

Suggested topics/sessions:

1. Shakespeare, canon, and the Second World War
	* psychological warfare
	* Shakespeare, high and low literature and theatre
	* representation, gender, power, and war
	* Shakespeare's characters
	* Shakespeare and value
	* Shakespeare and translation/ adaptation (canons of translated drama, 
adaptation as reinterpretation)
	* comedy, satire, and war
	* Shakespeare in theatre and other media (radio, film, music, ballet, 
opera)

2.Shakespeare and "national" repertoires during the Second World War
	* Theatre, national identity, cultural heritage
	* the national and the "foreign"
	* Shakespeare and colonialism/post-colonialism
	*  theatre and collectivity/collectivities
	* canons of wartime theatre
	* "our" and "their" uses of theatre: Allied versus Axis use of theatre
	* neutral countries and their use of Shakespeare
	* regional vs "national" theatre
	* Shakespeare and popular culture

3. Shakespeare, Canada, and the world during the Second World War
	* theatre on the home front
	* theatre in Quebec
	* theatre and education
	* theatre and women
	* alternative theatres
	* theatre and children
	* Shakespeare and reading groups
	* Theatre and persecuted or interned groups

4. Shakespeare at the front and in captivity during the Second World War
	* theatre at the front
	* theatre and the military
	* shipboard theatre
	* touring companies
	* theatre in the camps (internment, labour, prisoner of war, and 
displaced persons')
	* theatre in occupied territories
	* theater and exile

5. Shakespeare at war today
	* the tasks of theatre
	* changing uses of theatre under new conditions
	* the view from above: ideology, propaganda, and theatre
	* theatre and political formation
	* theatre and collaboration
	* theatre and propaganda
	* national and other mythologies
	* shaping audience response
	* theatre as cultural mediation
	* theatre and suffering
	* theatre and affect
	* theatre, trauma, memory

The Organizing Committee invites papers from scholars of all relevant 
disciplines - such as Theatre, English, History, Language and Literature 
Programs, Cultural Studies, Communication, Sociology and Anthropology, 
Political Science, Gender and Women's Studies, Philosophy, Psychology - 
as well as from theatre practitioners, and especially encourages papers 
that focus on theatre and Shakespeare in the Second World War while 
approaching this topic in a comparative and interdisciplinary way.

A 250 word abstract of proposed papers, along with a brief curriculum 
vitae, must be submitted electronically (preferably in Word or Rich Text 
format) by 1 November 2008 either in English or in French to the 
Organizing Committee care of  Professor Irene (Irena) Makaryk at 
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . Selected conference papers will be published in a 
special volume.

Pending a successful grant application, limited funding will be 
available for graduate students.

The Organizing Committee:
Irene (Irena) R. Makaryk, Chair of the Organizing Committee, Department 
of English Yana Meerzon, Departement de theatre/Department of Theatre
Tibor Egervari, Departement de theatre/Department of Theatre
Jeff Keshen, Departement d'histoire/Department of History
Annie Brisset, Ecole de traduction et d' interpretation/Department of 
Translation and Interpretation
Marissa McHugh, graduate student, Department of English

The University of Ottawa, Canada's oldest bilingual university, is 
located in the heart of the national Capital, within walking distance of 
historic Parliament Hill, the Rideau Canal (a World Heritage Site), the 
National Gallery of Art, and the busy Byward market, and within a few 
minutes' drive of the beautiful wooded hills of Gatineau, Quebec. 
Details about the city may be found at http://www.ottawa.com and about 
the university at www.uottawa.ca.

Irene (Irena) R. Makaryk, PhD
Vice-dean / Vice-doyenne
Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies/
Faculte des etudes superieures et postdoctorales
115 Seraphin-Marion
Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare's Style

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0152  Friday, 7 March 2008

From:		Tom Reedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Saturday, 01 Mar 2008 10:31:26 -0600
Subject: 19.0143  Shakespeare's Style
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0143  Shakespeare's Style

Jim Carroll wrote:

 >Most attributionists seem to make the same
 >mistake: they make a list of things that one text has
 >in common with one author, while ignoring the
 >same attributes in other authors.

He then goes on to give us a list of the appearance in Shakespeare of 
the word "countenance" to support his attribution of Titus 1.1 to 
Shakespeare, while ignoring all the other things that Titus has in 
common with Peele's works.

In his *Shakespeare, Co-Author,* (Oxford UP, 2002) Sir Brian Vickers 
includes a list of parallels of language and thought noted by Wilson, 
Hart, and himself, not only to Peele's other works, but also parallels 
of Shakespeare's other works compared to his part of the play; 
calculations from Parrott and Timberlake of feminine endings, which are 
compared to averages from both Shakespeare and Peele's other works; 
examples of classical vocabulary as used in Peele's and Shakespeare's 
works; comparisons of rhetorical figures of Titus and LLL drawn from 
Hill's study of Elizabethan rhetoric; studies by Macdonald Jackson on 
compound adjectives and the un-prefix in Titus that clearly distinguish 
the two authors in the play; Jackson's vocabulary list of rare words, 
which discriminates between the two authors; Tarlinskaja's stress 
profiles, which show a clear difference between the two authors, 
assigning a more archaic rhythmical style to the scenes not by 
Shakespeare; tables of abstract nouns, function words, verbal formulae, 
polysyllabic words, alliterations, vocatives, feminine endings, metrics, 
etc., as well as examples of historical criticism claiming the play was 
only partly by Shakespeare.

While Jim is correct that these are lists, their depth and number argue 
convincingly for Peele's authorship of 1.1, 2.1, 2.2 and 4.1 of Titus.

I would urge anyone interested in this topic to wade through 
humanities.lit.authors.shakespeare and find the nine discussion threads 
titled "The Battle of Alcazar." I have posted the entire play for 
comparison with Titus.

Tom Reedy

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

The Best Hamlet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0150  Friday, 7 March 2008

[1] 	From:	Marilyn A. Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Friday, 29 Feb 2008 15:42:17 -0500
	Subj:	RE: SHK 19.0141 The Best Hamlet

[2] 	From:	William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Friday, 29 Feb 2008 17:11:14 -0500
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0141 The Best Hamlet

[3] 	From:	Mario Ghezzi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Saturday, 01 Mar 2008 17:18:10 +1100
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0141 The Best Hamlet

[4] 	From:	Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Saturday, 1 Mar 2008 11:56:25 -0000
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0129 The Best Hamlet

[5] 	From:	Ida Gaskin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Sunday, 2 Mar 2008 13:11:35 +1300
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0141 The Best Hamlet

[6] 	From:	Anna Kamaralli <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Tuesday, 4 Mar 2008 13:55:41 +0000 (GMT)
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0141 The Best Hamlet

[7] 	From:	Patty Winter <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Wednesday, 5 Mar 2008 09:22:41 -0800
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0137 The Best Hamlet


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Marilyn A. Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Friday, 29 Feb 2008 15:42:17 -0500
Subject: 19.0141 The Best Hamlet
Comment:	RE: SHK 19.0141 The Best Hamlet

If the criteria for a great Hamlet (I won't say "best" for reasons 
enumerated) seen live include making both script and character come 
alive, engaging/engrossing the audience so that the well-known becomes 
new and fresh...

Then I have to say the "best" Hamlet I ever saw was either Hamish 
Linklater (despite the NYTimes saying he was overshadowed by other 
parts/players-Long Wharf Theatre 2004) or Stacy Keach Long Wharf 
Theatre, 1970. I *still* can see moments from that dark, dark performance.

I may have posted a review of the Linklater Hamlet to SHAKSPER at the time.

Mari Bonomi

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Friday, 29 Feb 2008 17:11:14 -0500
Subject: 19.0141 The Best Hamlet
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0141 The Best Hamlet

I'd like to cast a vote for Marni Penning's female Hamlet. She was 
great, and the production went to the Cleveland SAA meeting with Jasson 
Minidakis as director. The production was marked by glitches. The 
rebellious Laertes went out for a smoke when he should have been leading 
his rebels. Claudius and Gertrude had to shout for him to appear-but 
still no Laertes. Finally, Claudius had enough of this and was striding 
out to get Laertes when he finally runs on panting. The production was 
updated, and Claudius carried a handgun. Later in the run, the gun 
jammed-so he threw it at Marni-and missed. Nonetheless, I was flattered 
when someone took me for the director.

Bill

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Mario Ghezzi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Saturday, 01 Mar 2008 17:18:10 +1100
Subject: 19.0141 The Best Hamlet
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0141 The Best Hamlet

The best Hamlet I ever experienced was Richard Roxburgh's Hamlet for 
Company B's production in 1999 in Sydney Australia. Here was the 
mercurial minded and 'lethal' youth so often missing from productions 
with older players. This Hamlet indeed suffered because he knew too much 
about this 'sullied flesh' we all inhabit and that he had been born to 
'set it right' in the 'prison' of Denmark. It was directed by Neil 
Armfield, a gifted talent if there ever was one. By the way, Geoffrey 
Rush played Horatio and was the best I have ever seen in the role. Let 
me put in a word for the quality of Aussie Shakespeare productions.

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Saturday, 1 Mar 2008 11:56:25 -0000
Subject: 19.0129 The Best Hamlet
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0129 The Best Hamlet

Arnold Schwarzenegger.

T. Hawkes

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Ida Gaskin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Sunday, 2 Mar 2008 13:11:35 +1300
Subject: 19.0141 The Best Hamlet
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0141 The Best Hamlet

Gloria Belcher asks if anyone else saw Roger Rees 's Hamlet in the RSC 
1984/5 Stratford season. I was also in UK and saw all the productions of 
that year and agree that Rees's was a most memorable performance (as was 
his Berowne in "Love's Labour's Lost" the same year). But for me the 
best ever Hamlet was the first I saw- Alec Guinness in a "modern dress" 
version at the Old Vic in 1938 when he was young and I was young!

Ida Gaskin.

[6]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Anna Kamaralli <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Tuesday, 4 Mar 2008 13:55:41 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: 19.0141 The Best Hamlet
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0141 The Best Hamlet

When I saw Calixto Bieito's 2003 production I realised that, although I 
thought I had seen several bad Hamlets, they had actually been merely 
mediocre.

Regards,
Anna

[7]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Patty Winter <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Wednesday, 5 Mar 2008 09:22:41 -0800
Subject: 19.0137 The Best Hamlet
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0137 The Best Hamlet

The New York branch of the Paley Center for Media (formerly the Museum 
of Television & Radio) will be presenting a recording of Richard 
Burton's 1964 "Hamlet" in May. I believe this is the same 
"Electronovision" recording that is already available on commercial DVD, 
but at the Paley Center, you'll be able to see it on the big screen. 
Also, the video will be introduced by his daughter Kate.

More information here:

http://www.mtr.org/events/ss-08spring/ny-performance.htm#5-22

Patty

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Solid Flesh Once More

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0151  Friday, 7 March 2008

[1] 	From:	Cheryl Newton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Friday, 29 Feb 2008 16:16:49 -0500
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0136 Solid Flesh Once More

[2] 	From:	Steve Roth <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date:	Thursday, 6 Mar 2008 09:03:22 -0800
	Subj:	Re: SHK 19.0131 Solid Flesh Once More


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Cheryl Newton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Friday, 29 Feb 2008 16:16:49 -0500
Subject: 19.0136 Solid Flesh Once More
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0136 Solid Flesh Once More

David Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> writes,

[ . . . ] but since this thought apparently doesn't compute with anyone 
on this list, I must tentatively conclude, with pleasant surprise, that 
I am the only critic who has ever thought of it..

Almost, almost! I suggested that the word is 'solid,' and that  the 
closing is not 'to a dew' but 'to adieu' ( to farewell/death.) Another 
Lady Scholar here suggested the same thing.

Cheryl

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:		Steve Roth <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Thursday, 6 Mar 2008 09:03:22 -0800
Subject: 19.0131 Solid Flesh Once More
Comment:	Re: SHK 19.0131 Solid Flesh Once More

What a stunningly good post. Thanks, Martin, for contributing to our 
understand of the "dense network of Shakespeare's usage."

This emblematic debate reveals:

1. The either/or difficulty that an editor (for stage or [but especially 
for] page) faces in having to select a single variant. (Something that a 
reader/auditor/ponderer need not do.)

2. The often rather pointless either/or debates that (we) scholars 
engage in.

3. The fact that Hamlet exists in innumerable fixed versions for stage 
and page, but that its ultimate expression exists only in the mind of a 
reader/auditor/ponderer capable of perceiving, (nearly?) simultaneously, 
multiple and multivalent intertwined meanings.

4. The fact--happily now more widely accepted since Lukas Erne re-opened 
the door for interpretations that allow for a reader rather than 
auditors only--that reading, re-reading, researching, analyzing, and 
pondering Shakespeare's plays reveals depths and complexities of meaning 
unavailable to (even a multiple) auditor. (Which itself suggests that 
Shakespeare had both auditors and readers in mind while composing.)

So:

Q: Is Hamlet's flesh sullied, sallied, or solid?

A: Yes.

But "and," not "or."

Special thanks to Martin for bringing the military meaning of 
sally/sallied firmly into the field for this line. It adds a whole ream 
of cross-correlations, echoing across the play.

See, for instance, the vector from this military connotation to Hamlet's 
comment on Fortinbras' Polish adventure, and that passage's association 
between military sallies and sullied flesh:

Two thousand soules, & twenty thousand duckets
Will not debate the question of this straw,
This is th'Imposthume of much wealth and peace,
That inward breakes, and showes no cause without
Why the man dies.

Which echoes back to Hamlet's bit on how Denmark's "atchieuements, 
though perform'd at height" are sullied by Claudius's "heauy headed 
reueale east and west." A "dram of eale," "some viscious mole of nature 
in" "particular men," sullies "all the noble substance" of a man, or of 
a warlike state.

I would add associations with the word "sallet," as in seasoning. (With 
some connotations with rotten meat, since seasonings were used to both 
prevent and disguise same.)

cf Hamlet approvingly remembering the comment by his fellow auditor of 
Dido ("whose judgement[s] in such matters cried in the top of mine"), 
who was himself so approving of Dido and its playwright. The play, said 
this worthy critic, was not sullied with condescensions to "the 
general." It had "no sallets in the lines to make the matter savory." 
(Could "sallets" also hint at military sallies, fights and bombast 
played to the pit? Perhaps...)

Likewise (thank god!) Hamlet's highbrow co-critic found "no matter in 
the phrase that might indite the author of affect[at]ion."

<g>

Steve

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Sonnets Performed

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0149  Friday, 7 March 2008

From:		Scott Shepherd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:		Saturday, 1 Mar 2008 16:08:02 -0500
Subject:	Sonnets Performed

I'm curious about the performance history, if any, of the sonnets. Have 
there been particularly successful or otherwise notable live 
presentations that people remember or have read about? And which are the 
most interesting recordings?

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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