2008

NEH Summer Seminar

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0651  Tuesday, 18 November 2008

From: 		Mark Rankin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, 18 Nov 2008 15:22:50 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 	NEH Summer Seminar

NEH Summer Seminar for College and University Teachers
The Reformation of the Book: 1450-1650

John N. King and James K. Bracken of The Ohio State University will direct a 
National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar for College and University 
Teachers on continuity and change in the production, dissemination, and reading 
of Western European books during the 200 years following the advent of printing 
with movable type. In particular, they plan to pose the governing question of 
whether the advent of printing was a necessary precondition for the Protestant 
Reformation. Participants will consider ways in which adherents of different 
religious faiths shared common ground in exploiting elements such as book 
layout, typography, illustration, and paratext (e.g., prefaces, glosses, and 
commentaries) in order to inspire reading, but also to restrict interpretation. 
Employing key methods of the History of the Book, our investigation will 
consider how the physical nature of books affected ways in which readers 
understood and assimilated their intellectual contents. This program is geared 
to meet the needs of teacher-scholars interested in  the literary, political, or 
cultural history of the Renaissance and/or Reformation, the History of the Book, 
art history, women's studies, religious studies, bibliography, print culture, 
library science (including rare book librarians), mass communication, literacy 
studies, and more.

This seminar will meet from 22 June until 24 July 2009. During the first week of 
this program, we shall visit 1) Antwerp, Belgium, in order to draw on resources 
including the Plantin-Moretus Museum (the world's only surviving early modern 
printing and publishing house) and 2) London, England, in order to attend a 
rare-book workshop and consider treasures at the British Library. During four 
weeks at Oxford, where we shall reside at St. Edmund Hall, we plan to draw on 
the rare book and manuscript holdings of the Bodleian Library and other 
institutions.

Those eligible to apply include citizens of USA who are engaged in teaching at 
the college or university level and independent scholars who have received the 
terminal degree in their field (usually the Ph.D.). In addition, non-US citizens 
who have taught and lived in the USA for at least three years prior to March 
2009 are eligible to apply. NEH will provide participants with a stipend of $3,800.

Full details and application information are available at 
http://people.cohums.ohio-state.edu/king2/Reformationofthebook/. For further 
information, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The application deadline is March 
2, 2009.


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

Jonathan Bate's _Soul of the Age_

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0650  Tuesday, 18 November 2008

From:       Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, November 18, 2008
Subject:    Jonathan Bate's _Soul of the Age_

The following review by Rene Weis appeared recently in the online version of The 
Independent <http://www.independent.co.uk/>:

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/reviews/soul-of-the-age-by-jonathan-bate-1017096.html

November 14, 2008
Soul of the Age, By Jonathan Bate

Jonathan Bate sets out to write "an intellectual biography" of Shakespeare; or, 
as he puts it, to explore "Shakespeare's wit in the full 16th-century sense of 
the word". He loosely structures Soul of the Age around "the seven ages of man" 
speech by the melancholy Jaques in As You Like It. Nothing wrong with that: it 
has the merit of following Shakespeare's own potted view of the curve of human 
life. But Bate, to be true to his disdain for subjective expression in 
literature, ought to acknowledge that these lines, though written by 
Shakespeare, are spoken by a jaded cynic whose name means "privy".

[ . . . ]

Bate announces that "Gathering what we can from his plays and poems: that is how 
we will write a biography that is true to him". The truth will follow, nothing 
less. To this end, he instructs us, we need subtly to "triangulate" the life, 
work and world, and search for "traces of cultural DNA", or else run the 
gauntlet of the "immense perils" of literalism. To firm up this rebranded New 
Criticism, Bate approvingly cites an Oxford academic; never mind that Goethe, 
Wordsworth and Keats might take a different view.

A mere 47 pages later, however, Bate is shifting his ground. "We must always be 
wary", he warns again, "of attempts to map Shakespeare's life on to his work. 
But writers cannot avoid drawing on their experience". Some "but"! Bate now 
finds himself arguing that Shakespeare's portrayal of doctors after King Lear 
was inspired by the arrival of Dr John Hall, who in 1607 married Susanna 
Shakespeare. Later, Bate concedes further points of intersection between 
Shakespeare's life and art in Macbeth. The Porter's speech directly alludes to 
the real-life trial and execution in 1606 of Father Henry Garnett. Much the same 
applies to the use of Gower in Pericles, to the cross-gender twins in Twelfth 
Night, and to much else - including Shakespeare's reference to his friend and 
publisher Richard Field in Cymbeline.

An early chapter is given over entirely to The Tempest, one of three discrete 
discussions of Shakespeare's last solo play. According to Bate, it "asks a 
central humanist question: what do we have to learn from books?" The play 
features here only because of its links with books, just when Bate is trying to 
extrapolate Shakespeare's surmised library from his education at the Stratford 
grammar school. His pages on Shakespeare's schooling are generally well done, 
though quite dense. Bate the professor gets stuck into Shakespeare's sources 
while elsewhere warning his readers against recreating Shakespeare in their own 
image. His Shakespeare belongs to the world of intellectual literary history. 
For Bate, Shakespeare's plays are tame, Anglican creatures. Characteristically, 
he sees a fairy-tale Ovid everywhere in A Midsummer Night's Dream when 
Shakespeare here owes far more to Apuleius' brilliantly kinky The Golden Ass, as 
Frank Kermode showed long ago.

[ . . . ]

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

All-Male Romeo and Juliet at the Shakespeare Theatre

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0648  Thursday, 13 November 2008

From:       Felix de Villiers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Monday, 10 Nov 2008 09:10:23 +0100
Subject: All-Male Romeo and Juliet at the Shakespeare Theatre
Comment:    SHK 19.0638 All-Male Romeo and Juliet at the Shakespeare Theatre

The failure of Romeo and Juliet to abscond seems plausible to me. Everything 
happened so quickly. Their secret marriage was already an act if wild defiance 
to their families. They barely had the time to make such plans. Then we often 
have two souls in us: one that rebels and the other that holds back and 'obeys' 
and can't so easily challenge authority. The young lovers would have needed time 
to plan their next move. Escape and a fait accompli marriage would probably have 
led to dire consequences. Shakespeare knew from the start that he was writing a 
tragedy which leaves us with two eternal youths, their failure and their 
triumph. That is the main point of the play rather than things people could or 
couldn't have done. (I would have expanded this theme more but don't have the time)

Felix de Villiers

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

CFP: Compass Interdisciplinary Virtual Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0649  Tuesday, 18 November 2008

From: 		Verity Warne <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, 18 Nov 2008 13:25:53 +0000
Subject: 	Compass Interdisciplinary Virtual Conference - Call for Papers

CALL FOR PAPERS

Blackwell Compass Interdisciplinary Virtual Conference: "Breaking Down Barriers"
19-30 October 2009
www.blackwell-compass.com/home_conference<http://www.blackwell-compass.com/home_conference>
Join the largest online meeting of minds in the social sciences and humanities

Location: ONLINE | Free registration
ABSTRACT SUBMISSION DEADLINE: 1 JANUARY 2009
Registration Is Free! To register visit 
http://www.blackwellpublishingsurvey.com/survey/149278/29a8

The first Compass online conference aims to help break academic boundaries - 
within and between disciplines, between theory and practice, approaches and 
methodologies - by providing a space for multi and cross disciplinary review on 
the theme of Breaking Down Barriers.

Abstracts are invited for survey/review papers from the disciplines of History, 
Literature, Philosophy, Religion, Geography, Linguistics, Sociology, and Social 
Psychology.   In particular, we welcome papers that explore the issues of 
Paradigms | Borders |  The Environment | Communication | Justice and Human Rights

Key note Speakers include:
PROFESSOR ROGER GRIFFIN -  Oxford Brookes University (History/Politics) 
http://ah.brookes.ac.uk/staff/details/griffin
PROFESSOR DAVID CRYSTAL - University of Wales, Bangor (Language/Linguistics) 
http://www.davidcrystal.com/David_Crystal/biography.htm
DR ROY BAUMEISTER - Florida State University  (Social Psychology) 
http://www.psy.fsu.edu/faculty/baumeister.dp.html
PROFESSOR PETER LUDLOW - Northwestern University (Philosophy) 
http://www.philosophy.northwestern.edu/people/ludlow.htm
DR EILEEN JOY -  Southern Illinois University Edwardsville (Literature) 
http://www.siue.edu/ENGLISH/Directory/joy.html
PROFESSOR MARK MACKLIN - University of Wales, Aberystwyth (Physical Geography) 
http://www.aber.ac.uk/rivers/staff/macklin.htm

SUBMISSION DETAILS
- Abstract submission deadline: 1 January 2009
- An Abstract submission template is available at 
http://www.blackwell-compass.com/home_conference. Send your abstracts to 
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.<mailto:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
- Papers will be peer-reviewed. Each accepted paper will receive two formal 
commentaries plus comments from attendees and will be published in one of the 
Compass journals. Preference will be given to papers which hold interest for 
more than one discipline.

For more information on the conference and instructions for authors visit 
www.blackwell-compass.com/home_conference<http://www.blackwell-compass.com/home_conference>

For more information on the Compass journals visit 
www.blackwell-compass.com<http://www.blackwell-compass.com>

Please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.<mailto:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> 
if you have any queries regarding this event.


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

Heroes

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0647  Thursday, 13 November 2008

[1] From:   Arthur Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Monday, 10 Nov 2008 09:34:06 +0000
     Subt:   Re: SHK 19.0640 Heroes

[2] From:   Donald Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Monday, 10 Nov 2008 08:12:02 -0600
     Subt:   RE: SHK 19.0640 Heroes

[3] From:   Steve Roth <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Tuesday, 11 Nov 2008 16:53:58 -0700
     Subt:   Re: SHK 19.0640 Heroes


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Arthur Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Monday, 10 Nov 2008 09:34:06 +0000
Subject: 19.0640 Heroes
Comment:    Re: SHK 19.0640 Heroes

Given the striking inadequacy of the summary of the action that Horatio delivers 
and the fact that, unlike us, he does not have access to Hamlet's soliloquies, I 
think he's liable to be more anti-bard than bard.

Arthur

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Donald Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Monday, 10 Nov 2008 08:12:02 -0600
Subject: 19.0640 Heroes
Comment:    RE: SHK 19.0640 Heroes

Julia Griffin writes, "The Bishop of Carlisle in Richard II is a hero. He stays 
loyal to Richard till the end, involves himself in no treacherous plots, and 
speaks truth to
Bolingbroke in power."

I could quibble with all of this, but the middle point is particularly 
questionable. At the end of Act IV, Aumerle asks the bishop and the abbot of 
Westminster, "You high-born clergymen, / is there no plot to rid the realm of 
this pernicious blot?" The abbot responds, "My lord, / Before I freely speak my 
mind herein, / You shall not only take the sacrament / To bury mine intents, but 
also to effect / Whatever I shall happen to devise. / I see your brows are full 
of discontent, / Your hearts of sorrow and your eyes of tears: Come home with me 
to supper ; and I'll lay  / A plot shall show us all a merry day."

The plural "hearts," we assume, means that he is referring to both the bishop 
and the young duke. The bishop does not demur.

In V, ii, we (along with his father, the duke of York) discover that Aumerle is 
one of a dozen that have "ta'en the sacrament, /  And interchangeably set down 
their hands / To kill the king at Oxford." Presumably the dozen includes 
Carlisle owing to his connection to the abbot and Aumerle.

He is not mentioned specifically, when Bolingbroke, having learned of the plot 
from his uncle York, orders the duke to gather "several powers" to track them 
down, but in the last scene, he is brought alive to Bolingbroke and sent to a 
monastery rather than the block. That may indicate that he is not so guilty as 
Oxford, Salisbury, Blunt, Kent, Brocas, Sir Bennet Seely, and the abbot, but the 
play does not say so.

His speech to Bolingbroke about the sanctity of kingship may be courageous, but 
he does seem to be an assassin, albeit an unsuccessful one.

don

p.s. I find, by the way, in the array of definitions of the heroic, confirmation 
of my original point that we have lost a common idea of what it consists of.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Steve Roth <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 11 Nov 2008 16:53:58 -0700
Subject: 19.0640 Heroes
Comment:    Re: SHK 19.0640 Heroes

David Evett on Horatio:

 >Hamlet has assigned him a job that the prince seems
 >to think he has resources to handle:
 >to be Homer, not Achilles, not the hero, but the bard

Or perhaps we should say that Shakespeare has had Hamlet assign Horatio the role 
of Shakespeare-but the writer and chronicler, not the "actor." (And like 
Shakespeare the history writer, poor Horatio is sadly short on objective facts 
about what actually happened.)

Hero? Not to my eyes. Just a hale fellow well-met.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

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