2008

A Fragment of Style

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0593  Sunday, 12 October 2008

[1] From:   John W Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Tuesday, 07 Oct 2008 16:38:18 -0400
     Subt:   Re: SHK 19.0586 A Fragment of Style

[2] From:   Peter Groves <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Wednesday, 08 Oct 2008 12:03:29 +1100
     Subt:   Re: SHK 19.0586 A Fragment of Style

[3] From:   Felix de Villiers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Wednesday, 8 Oct 2008 07:22:16 +0200
     Subt:   A Fragment of Style


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       John W Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 07 Oct 2008 16:38:18 -0400
Subject: 19.0586 A Fragment of Style
Comment:    Re: SHK 19.0586 A Fragment of Style

From:       Robert Projansky This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 >4. "sufficient" is either pronounced suf-FISH-ee-ENT or, if that
 >sounds too weird, pronounced suf-FISH-ent and followed by a
 >one- beat  pause.
 >
 >Lod.
 >Is this the noble Moore, whom our full Senate
 >Call all in all sufficient? Is this the noble nature,
 >Whom passion could not shake? Whose solid virtue,
 >The shot of accident nor dart of chance
 >Could neither graze, nor pierce?

Hardly "sufFISHiENT" -- that would make the line an outright  fourteener -- and 
a feminine one at that! Even when it is pronounced  with only three syllables, 
it takes synelepha to reduce the line to a  (feminine) alexandrine, which is 
still a foot too many, but believable.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Peter Groves <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Wednesday, 08 Oct 2008 12:03:29 +1100
Subject: 19.0586 A Fragment of Style
Comment:    Re: SHK 19.0586 A Fragment of Style

 >Robert Projansky writes: " I beg to differ about the metrical scheme of
 >the Othello scene fragment that Felix de Villiers cites. The verse
 >therein is quite regular,
 >without even a  trochee to vary the iambic pentameter.", later
 >suggesting that including reversals or 'trochees' would constitute
 >"undoing the meter", making it "like prose".
 >
 >I in turn beg to differ: in fact this passage, like other passages of
 >agitated speech in Shakespeare, has several phonologically obligatory
 >reversals (indicated by < and >) and many optional ones (indicated by <
 >and |). To ignore all the optional reversals would merely be wooden; to
 >ignore the obligatory ones ("veRY") would be to abandon the English
 >language.
 >
 >   <Ay, you| did wish that I would make her turn:
 >   <Sir she| can turn, and turn, and yet go on,
 >   And turn again, <and she| can weep sir, weep;
 >   <And she's| obedient, as you say, obedient;
 >   <Very>obedient. Proceed you in your tears,
 >   Concerning this sir:  O well painted passion:
 >   <I am| commanded here: --- <get you>away,
 >   I'll send for you anon: --- <Sir, I>obey the mandate
 >   <And will| return to Venice: ---hence, avaunt!
 >                                          Exit Desdemona
 >   <Cassio>shall have my place; and sir to night
 >   <I do| intreat that we may sup together,
 >   You are welcome sir to Cypres, ---goates and monkies.
 >                                          Exit.
 >  Lod.
 > Is this the noble Moore, <whom our| full Senate
 > Call all in all sufficient? Is this the noble nature,
 > Whom passion could not shake? Whose solid virtue,
 > The shot of accident nor dart of chance
 > Could neither graze, nor pierce?
 >
 >Here's another passage of agitated speech:
 >
 >Lear. <Let it>be so, thy truth then be thy dowre:
 ><For by| the sacred radience of the Sunne,
 >The mis[t]eries of Heccat and the night:
 >By all the operation of the Orbes,
 >>From whom we do exist, and cease to be,
 ><Heere I>disclaime <all my>Paternall care,
 >Propinquity and property of blood,
 ><[And] as| a stranger to my heart and me,
 ><Hold thee| from this for ever. The barbarous Scythian,
 >Or he that makes his generation messes
 >To gorge his appetite, <shall to| my bosome
 ><Be as| well neighbour'd, pitied, and releev'd,
 >As thou my somtime Daughter.
 >Kent.                                          Good my Liege.

It is a mistake to suppose that metrical variation kills the pentameter; on the 
contrary, so long as it stays within the rules (e.g. no successive reversals) it 
gives it life.

Peter Groves
School of English etc.
Monash University

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Felix de Villiers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Wednesday, 8 Oct 2008 07:22:16 +0200
Subject:    A Fragment of Style

I appreciated Robert Projansky's reply and am glad I provoked him to write. He 
makes very interesting points. I have already written that I'm on the site to 
learn. I'll save his letter for special study.

At the same time, I think he misunderstood me. When I was writing that piece I 
paid little attention to the regular or irregular meter. I took the iambic 
pentameter for granted. What I find jagged in Othello's speech is the short 
phrasing and his mind flying in different directions, which, I think, does have 
a disturbing effect on the meter. By texture, I certainly don't mean the meter, 
but of course, the sound pattern and that I feel the repetitions biting into this.

Yours,
Felix

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
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responsibility for them.

All-Male Romeo and Juliet at the Shakespeare Theatre

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0592  Sunday, 12 October 2008

From:       Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 07 Oct 2008 15:25:43 -0400
Subject: 19.0585 All-Male Romeo and Juliet at the Shakespeare Theatre
Comment:    Re: SHK 19.0585 All-Male Romeo and Juliet at the Shakespeare Theatre

 >The play is what it is, as it now stands. The director's problem
 >is to find some way to convey a character, otherwise described
 >in the play, whose failure to act sensibly is shown to be in
 >character.

It seems to me that impulsiveness and flightiness are dominant elements of 
Romeo's character as given in the text. What does a director or actor need to do 
to convey this to an intelligent audience beyond merely performing the play as 
given?

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

Mirren to Star in Tempest Film

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0589  Sunday, 12 October 2008

From:       Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Sunday, October 12, 2008
Subject:    Mirren to Star in Tempest Film

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/7658628.stm

Mirren to Star in Tempest Film

Oscar-winning actress Dame Helen Mirren has signed up to star in a big-screen 
adaptation of Shakespeare's The Tempest, according to reports.

Film trade magazine Hollywood Reporter said director Julie Taymor had changed 
the gender of main character Prospero so Mirren could take the role.

Jeremy Irons, Djimon Hounsou, and Russell Brand are also due to appear in the 
film, it added.

Shooting is likely to start in Hawaii in November.

Shipwrecked crew

Alfred Molina, Ben Whishaw and Felicity Jones have also taken parts in the movie 
and Geoffrey Rush is in negotiations to join the cast, according to The 
Hollywood Reporter.

Shakespeare's castaway play mixes romance with fraternal politics and the 
supernatural.

The movie version will centre around Prospera, her daughter Miranda (Jones) and 
a shipwrecked crew full of Prospera's enemies.

The cast includes several Oscar-winning stars, including Mirren who collected 
her Academy Award for The Queen in 2007.

Irons took home the best actor trophy for Reversal of Fortune and Rush got the 
nod for Shine.

Hounsou won best supporting actor nominations for Blood Diamond and In America.

It is the second time Taymor has adapted a Shakespeare play for the big screen, 
after turning Titus Andronicus into the 1999 film Titus, with Anthony Hopkins in 
the lead role.

She previously directed a minimalist stage production of The Tempest, which was 
filmed for public television in the US.


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

RSC: Pictures of Theatre and Complete Works Festival

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0591  Sunday, 12 October 2008

From:       Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Sunday, October 12, 2008
Subject:    RSC: Pictures of Theatre and Complete Works Festival

As I read about the RSC's latest play with the tenth doctor, I came across some 
links in the online Guardian to sites with interesting content. The first, "75 
years at Stratford," is a series of 12 pictures intended to chronicle the seven 
decades of performances in the art deco styled Royal Shakespeare Theatre from 
its opening in 1932 until is closing performance on March 31, 2007, including a 
drawing of David Garrick's Jubilee Pavilion constructed in 1769 on the banks of 
the Avon, a 1900 photograph of the old Shakespeare Memorial Theatre, and several 
photos from the evening of the last performance.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/arts/gallery/2007/apr/02/stratford?picture=329765892

The second, "RSC Complete Works Festival," is a link to the year-long festival 
hosted by the RSC at Stratford.

http://www.rsc.org.uk/WhatsOn/completeworks.aspx

The Complete Works was the first time all 37 plays, the sonnets, and the long 
poems have been presented at the same event. Fifteen of the productions in The 
Complete Works were staged by the RSC with the remainder being the works of 
companies from around the world invited to Stratford to perform in the event. A 
link off the main page, "Looking Back at the Festival," houses three galleries 
of stunning pictures that capture highlights of the festival.

Enjoy,
Hardy

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

Politics, Prince Hal, and the Making of a Leader

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0588  Sunday, 12 October 2008

From:       Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Sunday, October 12, 2008
Subject:    Politics, Prince Hal, and the Making of a Leader

http://www.broadwayworld.com/viewcolumn.cfm?colid=33833

Schreiber, Easton and More to Read for Shakespeare Society at 'Making of a Leader'

The Shakespeare Society (Michael Sexton, Artistic Director) will present Liev 
Schreiber, Richard Easton, and Professor David Scott Kastan in "Politics, Prince 
Hal, and the Making of a Leader" on Monday, November 3 at 6:30 pm at the Kaye 
Playhouse at Hunter College, East 68 Street, between Park and Lexington Avenues. 
A limited number of tickets, priced at $25 - $45, are available from the Kaye 
box office at (212) 772-4448. For Shakespeare Society membership information, 
call 212-967-6802 or go to www.shakespearesociety.org.

On the eve of the 2008 elections, three of America's most celebrated 
Shakespeareans come together to look at Shakespeare's most successful political 
leader, Henry V. Featuring the Shakespeare Society's signature combination of 
performance and commentary, the evening will trace the progress of this 
remarkable figure, role-playing his way from prodigal son to the leader of a 
nation. What are the keys to -- and costs of -- political success?

Liev Schreiber (Hamlet, Macbeth, Glengarry Glen Ross) will read selections from 
Prince Hal and Henry V from the plays Henry IV, Parts I and II and Henry V, 
which he played in the New York Shakespeare Festival production at the Delacorte 
Theater.

Richard Easton (The Invention of Love, The Coast of Utopia, Henry IV) will be 
reading Falstaff and Henry IV (reprising the role he played in the Lincoln 
Center Theater production of Henry IV on Broadway opposite Kevin Kline.

David Scott Kastan, General Editor of the Arden Shakespeare and George M. Bodman 
Professor of English at Yale University, will examine Hal's development as a 
politician looking at the ways impersonation, role-playing and language are used 
politically and theatrically as well as what Shakespeare shows are the costs of 
political power -- what is sacrificed in pursuit of political success.

The cast also includes Jeremy Strong who is currently appearing in the 
Roundabout Theatre production of A Man for All Seasons and whose other credits 
include the lead role of Spinoza in David Ives's New Jerusalem at CSC.

[ . . . ]

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

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