2008

My Name Is Will

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0574  Sunday, 28 September 2008

From:       Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Wednesday, 24 Sep 2008 01:29:04 -0400
Subject: 19.0564 My Name Is Will
Comment:    Re: SHK 19.0564 My Name Is Will

 >To celebrate mass, hear confession, or perform any other
 >priestly office in the name of the Roman Catholic church
 >was to affirm the authority of Rome and the illegitimacy
 >of Elizabeth. Campion was by statutory definition thus guilty
 >of treason by all accounts -- and his own affirmation. (And
 >yes, of course, the laws were politically motivated -- the
 >Pope had in effect declared war against Elizabeth by means
 >of the bull, and himself engaged in sedition in inciting her
 >people to disobey her in all things, and these laws were
 >designed to reaffirm her legitimacy and supremacy.)

There are gaps in this syllogism. It does not follow from the Pope's assertion 
of authority to relieve Elizabeth's subjects from their allegiance to her (a 
matter of Roman canonical law) that practicing the rituals of Roman Catholicism 
was treason (governed by English statutory law). In fact, thousands of 
Englishmen and women continued to celebrate mass during ER's reign without being 
hanged, drawn and quartered. Supporting the Pope in his attempt to dethrone the 
queen was treason; serving mass was not such support and was not regarded as 
such (at least in practice). It was possible then, as now, to be a practicing 
Catholic without adhering the the Pope's political agenda. Thousands of loyal 
Englishmen were.

Walsingham's portfolio was state security, not religious orthodoxy. His spies in 
Douai -- including Christopher Marlowe, a notorious atheist -- went there to 
protect the regime, not the church. The national treasury was probably 
insufficient to enforce a sweeping persecution of Catholics, even if some 
hotheads would have preferred a reign of terror, and the risk of civil unrest 
was not worth running.

All this having been said, it seems to me that this thread, having only the most 
tenuous connection with Shakespeare, has probably exceeded its useful life.

[Editor's Note: RIP --HMCook]


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S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
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Original Play, THE TRAGEDY OF MACBETH, PART II

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0573  Sunday, 28 September 2008

From:       David McInnis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Wednesday, 24 Sep 2008 11:55:03 +1000 (EST)
Subject: 19.0567 Original Play, THE TRAGEDY OF MACBETH, PART II
Comment:    Re: SHK 19.0567 Original Play, THE TRAGEDY OF MACBETH, PART II

Might as well put in a good word for a friend whilst we're on this topic -- 
Apart from Edinburgh residents, northern hemisphere folk may not be aware that 
there was an earlier Macbeth sequel (written and staged a few years ago now) by 
Melbourne playwright David Mence, which was certainly unique: *Macbeth 
Rearisen*. Taking his cue from Shakespeare's line, "The time has been / That, 
when the brains were out, the man would die," Mence resurrected zombie-Macbeth 
in a shlock-horror comedy that fused iambic pentameter with pop culture's 
infatuation with zombie flicks. (An unlikely combination, but it was actually 
quite clever). From memory, the undead-lord and his wife tried to wrest the 
kingdom back from Malcolm.

The play received good reviews at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in 2006 (see the 
"about" section on the theatre company's website, www.whitewhaletheatre.com, for 
more info). I know Mence/White Whale Theatre is keen to make contact with North 
American Shakespeareans especially; maybe interested parties could contact him 
through his website, or email him at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.?


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

Renaissance / Early Modern British List

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0571  Sunday, 28 September 2008

From:       Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Sunday, September 28, 2008
Subject:    Renaissance / Early Modern British List

  [Editor's Note: Last week, I received the message below. I immediately thought 
of FICINO; however, FICINO is not limited to Early Modern British Lit. Anyone 
who replies should also copy suggestions to Grover Furr at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 
--HMCook]

From:       Grover Furr <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Thursday, 25 Sep 2008 09:25:05 -0400
Subject:    Best Renaissance / Early Modern British mailing list?

Dear Prof. Cook:

What's the best academic email list for Renaissance British Lit generally?

It seems that SHAKSPER is for Shakespeare alone.

There's a great one for the Middle Ages, called "Chaucer". It's for Middle 
English Lit generally, not just Chaucer.

There's got to be a good one for Renaissance lit -- say, through 1660 or so. Can 
you recommend one?

Thanks!

Sincerely,
Grover Furr
Montclair State University
Montclair NJ 07043

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

Prentice?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0572  Sunday, 28 September 2008

From:       Christopher Baker <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Wednesday, 24 Sep 2008 16:05:03 -0400
Subject:    Prentice?

I recall an exchange on this listserv not too long ago (several weeks at most) 
concerning the term prentice or 'prentice or apprentice, but I cannot locate it 
now on the search engine. Can anyone direct me to it?

Thanks,
Chris Baker

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

Bottom's Dream

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0570  Sunday, 28 September 2008

From:       Michael Friedman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 23 Sep 2008 16:46:32 -0400
Subject:    Bottom's Dream

I've been asked by a colleague whether the play A Midsummer Night's Dream has 
ever been equated with the dream from which Bottom awakens in 4.1 of the play, 
the one that he intends to have Peter Quince turn into a ballet. I was pretty 
sure that I had heard this argument before, but a search of "Bottom's Dream" in 
the World Shakespeare Bibliography did not allow me to identify any sources that 
discuss this idea. Can anyone point me toward a previous treatment of this notion?

Michael D. Friedman
University of Scranton
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

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