2008

CFP: Edited Collection on Early Modern Essays

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0456  Wednesday, 13 August 2008

From:       Annalisa Castaldo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Thursday, 31 Jul 2008 20:32:00 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:    CFP: Edited Collection on Early Modern Essays

CALL FOR PAPERS

"Play'd to Great Applause": Early Modern Audience and Audiences of Early Modern 
Drama

Editors seek articles of 5000-7000 words, including notes, for a proposed 
book-length collection, entitled "Play'd to Great Applause": Early Modern 
Audience and Audiences of Early Modern Drama

We seek essays discussing the behaviors, beliefs, attitudes, or composition of 
either contemporary or current audiences of early modern drama. Part One will 
look at audiences from 1580-1640, while Part Two will focus on late-twentieth 
and twenty-first century productions of early modern drama. This collection will 
focus on live performance, not film or television productions.

Articles may address such issues as:

. the audience and civic pageants
. the audience and dumb shows
. the audience and censorship
. the audience and other "entertainments" (hangings, bear-baitings, and sermons)
. anti-theatrical tracts' definition of audience
. actors as audience, audience as actors
. cult of personality
. power of the spectator
. non-Shakespearean plays and the modern viewer
. Shakespeare festivals
. modern staging in reconstructed theatres (London Globe)
. directing the early modern play for the 21st century audience

We welcome submissions from scholars, actors, directors, and others.

Send detailed proposals and brief CVs by January 31, 2009, to both editors, 
preferably electronically.

Completed essays will be expected by May 31, 2009.

Annalisa Castaldo, Humanities Division, 1 University Place, Widener University, 
Chester, PA 19050 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Rhonda Knight, Department of Communications, Language, and Literature, 300 E. 
College Ave., Coker College, Hartsville, SC 29550 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

World Premiere of Liberty

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0455  Wednesday, 13 August 2008

From:       Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Wednesday, August 13, 2008
Subject:    World Premiere of Liberty

World Premiere of Liberty

 From 31 August the Globe is premiering Liberty, a new play by the acclaimed 
dramatic poet Glyn Maxwell.

The French Revolution is four years old when Gamelin, an ambitious young artist, 
is made a magistrate for the ruling forces. How strong will the ties of love and 
friendship prove when he is given power over life and death, and the new 
republic plunges from high idealism to state terror?

Liberty is a thrilling adaptation of Anatole France's 1912 novel Les Dieux ont 
Soif and runs for 13 performances only.

For all performances we are offering our e-subscribers best available seats for 
just 15 GBP (usually up to 33 GBP). Call the Globe Box Office on 020 7401 9919 
and quote 'Liberty 15 GBP'. Offer not available online.

Hamlet at Midnight - but who?

At midnight on Saturday 6 September Tim Carroll and The Factory bring their 
unique production of Hamlet to the Globe Theatre for a special anniversary 
performance.

For the past year The Factory have performed a completely new production of 
Shakespeare's great tragedy each week. Every actor learns multiple parts but it 
is the audience that dictates the actual casting on the night. The staging is 
improvised in each venue. The only props used are items brought in by the audience.


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

_My Name is Will_

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0453  Wednesday, 13 August 2008

From:       Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Monday, August 11, 2008
Subject:    _My Name is Will_

[Editor's Note: The members of the SHAKSPER Book Review Panel have been working 
hard this summer establishing criteria and then vetting books for review, 
volunteering among themselves to review several of these, and preparing 
extended reviews for the new SHAKSPER book review feature. The first fruits of 
this group's work will be appearing shortly; initially as postings to the list 
and then as a permanent part of the SHAKSPER archives on the list's web site. 
Stay tuned. In the meantime, here on the lighter side are excerpts from a review 
from the _International Herald Tribune_ of a novel by Jess Winfield, an original 
member of The Reduced Shakespeare Company. -- HMC]

http://www.iht.com/articles/2008/07/26/arts/idbriefs26B.php

Jess Winfield's 'My Name is Will'
By Liesl Schillinger
Published: July 25, 2008

My Name is Will A Novel of Sex, Drugs, and Shakespeare. By Jess Winfield. 291 
pages. $23.99. Twelve.

Heavens to Murgatroyd! What could William Shakespeare, bard of Avon, possibly 
have in common with the cartoon characters Lilo and Stitch, Mickey Mouse and 
Buzz Lightyear? If you read "My Name Is Will," a lusty, pun-drunk first novel by 
the professional wiseacre and award-winning cartoon producer Jess Winfield (who 
had a hand in the above-mentioned entertainments), you will indubitably find 
out. But be "vewwy, vewwy careful," as one of Winfield's characters (a 
Shakespeare expert!) warns a wayward student, mimicking the immortal Elmer Fudd. 
Many of the gags are what Hanna-Barbera's hammy mountain lion Snagglepuss would 
call "abdomenable"; and if you've never heard the expression "What's in a name," 
you'll get to read it here for the first time - actually, the first, second and 
third times. Still, if you're up for the lark and could use a 
comedies-and-tragedies refresher, you might want to invest in a slide whistle 
and a cowbell before you start reading, to give the goings-on the Looney Tunes 
accompaniment they deserve.

In "My Name Is Will," William Shakespeare, imagined in his green youth (England, 
1580s), alternates chapters with an American alter ego, a hash-smoking 
University of California, Santa Cruz, grad student named Willie Shakespeare 
Greenberg (California, 1980s). While young Will frolics in the hedgerows of 
Stratford-upon-Avon with his Rosaline, incurring the wrath and the rack of 
anti-Catholic Elizabethan heavies, young Willie divides his time between chasing 
Ophelias, dodging Reaganite narcs and fiddling with a Rubik's Cube, musing all 
the while (purportedly) on the questions: "What was it that made Shakespeare 
great?" and "What made him Shakespeare?" If the haze in Willie Greenberg's mind 
were ever to burn off, answers to these eternal questions might emerge - answers 
that would "unlock the doors of Shakespeare's past, and his own future." Given, 
however, the abundant local supply of magic mushrooms, hash, pot and other 
mind-fogging distractions (including a brainy raven-haired doctoral candidate 
named Dashka, who looks like "the brunette from the Bangles" and wears green Doc 
Martens and saucy lingerie), Willie is content to defer the big questions. 
Instead, he occupies himself by deploying Shakespeare quotes like Spanish fly, 
seeing what bodices they might unlock, in the method patented by Cole Porter: 
"Just declaim a few lines from Othella / And they'll think you're a hell of a 
fella." That is to say: "Brush up your Shakespeare, and they'll / all kowtow." 
Willie's Dashka kowtows (so to speak) in a cow pasture, the back of a bus and a 
threesome. And that's saying nothing of Willie's girlfriend, Robin, and other 
susceptible damsels. Meanwhile, back in Stratford, the other William has his own 
troubles with "the local maidenry" - a shotgun wedding to the woman who one day 
will inherit his second-best bed, plus a Rosaline on the rampage.

[ . . . ]

To say that Jess Winfield knows his Shakespeare is laughable understatement. 
Upside down - boy, he knows him, inside out, and round and round. Winfield spent 
most of the 1980s performing theatrical parodies of the Bard's greatest hits at 
Renaissance Faires across California. The Reduced Shakespeare Company, which he 
formed with some fellow players, turned Shakespearian shtick into an Elizabethan 
juggernaut. In 1987, the group took its reduction production, "The Complete 
Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)," to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, and 
from there the show toured the world's stages, delivering the fractured, 
goosed-up Shakespeare oeuvre at breakneck speed, interlarding their performances 
with improv and contemporary cultural references.

[ . . . ]

There's at least one quasi-serious subtext here. Young Willie must persuade his 
master's degree adviser (a tippler and deft joint-roller with a healthy 
appreciation of psilocybin fungus) to accept the subject of his thesis, which he 
has conjured on a whim, while peeking into Dashka's cleavage. The rub? That 
Shakespeare may have been a closeted Catholic, and his teenage run-ins with 
anti-Catholic henchmen of the Virgin Queen may have shaped his dramatic 
sensibilities. It's a provocative notion, albeit one that has captured the 
public imagination long before now and has been voluminously bloviated upon.

[ . . . ]

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

The Theatre at Shoreditch Discovered

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0454  Wednesday, 13 August 2008

From:       Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Wednesday, August 13, 2008
Subject:    The Theatre at Shoreditch Discovered

[Editor's Note: Last week, many print and online newspapers reported on the 
discovery of remains of The Theatre, "the first substantial purpose-built London 
playhouse in England since Roman times, built in 1576 by James Burbage." 
(Gabriel Egan, _The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare_, eds., Michael Dobson and 
Stanley Wells, Oxford UP, 2001.). Here are excerpts from two of those reports 
that appeared in _The Times_ and _The Guardian_. --Hardy]

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/science/article4466781.ece

 From The Times
August 6, 2008
Dig reveals The Theatre - Shakespeare's first playhouse
Fiona Hamilton, London Correspondent

Every year hundreds of thousands of visitors make their way to 
Stratford-upon-Avon and the Globe Theatre, on the Thames, to explore 
Shakespeare's intriguing past.

Not surprisingly, an unremarkable plot of land on New Inn Broadway, just north 
of London's medieval City wall, does not rate a mention on the Shakespeare 
tourist trail, since before now only the most fervent history buffs were aware 
of the site's significance in the playwright's life.

However, that history can be laid bare after an archaeological dig at the 
Shoreditch site uncovered the remains of The Theatre -- one of the capital's 
first playhouses -- where Shakespeare's works were first performed in the 16th 
century.

In what the Museum of London Archaeology has described as "one of the most 
exciting finds of recent years", an excavation last month uncovered a large 
section of what is believed to be the original brick foundations of the theatre.

Jo Lyon, a senior archaeologist at the museum and the dig's project manager, 
told The Times yesterday that one of London's most enduring secrets had been 
uncovered.

[ . . . ]

An archaeological evaluation report for the borough of Hackney concluded that 
the remains were of "national, if not international, importance".

Julian Bowsher, a senior archaeologist at the museum, said that there could not 
be 100 per cent certainty about the remains. However, he said it was very 
likely, because the bricks form a polygon, which documentary evidence suggests 
was the shape of the theatre. "It's certainly in the right area and it's 
certainly very important," he said.

[ . . . ]

The Tower Theatre Company, which performs a Shakespeare work every year, will 
design its modern playhouse around the remains of the original. Jeff Kelly, the 
chairman of the company, said: "We're thrilled. It's an incredible coincidence 
that we want to build our theatre on the site of Shakespeare's first playhouse. 
It unveils a secret past."

[ . . . ]

http://www.guardian.co.uk/culture/2008/aug/07/shakespeare.shoreditch

Shakespeare's Shoreditch theatre unearthed
Archaeologists have discovered Shakespeare's lost theatre in east London
Maev Kennedy
Thursday August 07 2008 14:02 BST

A shiver of excitement rippled around the theatrical globe as news spread of 
some grubby red bricks uncovered in a muddy pit off a nondescript street in east 
London.

Sir Ian McKellen will be making his way to New Inn Broadway in Shoreditch, one 
of many theatre luminaries impatient to see the site where his hero William 
Shakespeare learned his trade not just as a playwright but an actor.

The rows of Tudor brickwork uncovered by archaeologists from the Museum of 
London are believed to be the foundations of The Theatre, lost for more than 400 
years since the building was dismantled in a stunt worthy of a Shakespeare comedy.

[ . . . ]

It was undoubtedly on the road and in Shoreditch, with Burbage's son and star 
actor Richard, that the upstart crow learned his trade, what worked and what 
bored the groundlings so that they started cracking walnuts and gossiping, how 
many kickshawses Andrew Aguecheek could dance across the thrust stage before he 
fell off into the pit, and what carried to the top gallery of The Wooden O: the 
famous phrase from Henry V almost certainly refers to The Theatre and was first 
heard there.

The team from the Museum of London has been re-drawing the theatrical map of 
Shakespeare's London, working on the sites of the Rose, the Hope, and the Globe 
itself - still buried under a modern building.

Usually they are racing ahead of the piledrivers for towering blocks of offices 
and flats. This time the site was being cleared for a new theatre -- like the 
original, a first permanent home for a touring company, the 75-year-old Tower 
Theatre Company, one of the great survivors of the amateur theatre world.

[ . . . ]

The crook-of-an-elbow-shaped angle of red brick uncovered is believed to be the 
north-east corner of the building -- an important discovery that will help 
calculate the exact shape and dimensions of the theatre. Archaeologists will now 
be working with architects to see if any of the remains can be preserved on 
display in the new building.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

SPECIAL REQUEST: London Suggestions

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0390  Friday, 11 July 2008

From:       Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Friday, July 11, 2008
Subject:    SPECIAL REQUEST: London Suggestions

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

I am going to take advantage of my position with this list and make a special 
request.

Since I have been abnormally preoccupied lately, I have not been able to 
formalize all of my travel plans to the UK during the first week of August.

My plane arrives at Heathrow at 10:00 am on Friday, August 1. My accommodations 
in Stratford-upon-Avon begin on Saturday, August 2. I thought that I might spend 
Friday in London, perhaps going to the New Globe to see Merry Wives at 2:00 
and-or Lear at 7:30 -- tickets appear to be available for both. I am wondering 
if anyone might be able to help me make this happen. Unfortunately, four years 
ago, I joined the ranks of the disabled, complicating all planning.

So, can anyone recommend a reasonably priced place to stay and ways that I can 
handle all of the transportation that would be involved: airport to hotel, hotel 
to Globe, Globe to hotel, and hotel to Stratford train?

I should have arranged all of this ahead of time, but circumstances have been 
strained for me.

Thanks for any assistance,
Hardy


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

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