2008

Character/Scene/Line Breakdown Charts

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0452  Thursday, 31 July 2008

[1] From:   Ron Severdia <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Friday, 25 Jul 2008 08:26:00 -0700
     Suct:   Re: SHK 19.0439 Character/Scene/Line Breakdown Charts

[2] From:   John Zuill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Saturday, 26 Jul 2008 12:25:08 +1000
     Suct:   Re: SHK 19.0442 Character/Scene/Line Breakdown Charts

[3] From:   Tom Salyers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Sunday, 27 Jul 2008 03:02:28 -0700 (PDT)
     Suct:   Re: SHK 19.0442 Character/Scene/Line Breakdown Charts


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Ron Severdia <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Friday, 25 Jul 2008 08:26:00 -0700
Subject: 19.0439 Character/Scene/Line Breakdown Charts
Comment:    Re: SHK 19.0439 Character/Scene/Line Breakdown Charts

There isn't a line count (eventually there will be), but all the scene pages on 
PlayShakespeare.com have a list of characters in that scene. For example:

http://www.playshakespeare.com/hamlet/scenes

Line counts will vary by edition, of course.

Cheers,
Ron Severdia
PlayShakespeare.com

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       John Zuill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Saturday, 26 Jul 2008 12:25:08 +1000
Subject: 19.0442 Character/Scene/Line Breakdown Charts
Comment:    Re: SHK 19.0442 Character/Scene/Line Breakdown Charts

This may be off topic again but oddly enough, doing a character scene break down 
of a play is something I do quite often. I tend to end up doing a lot of the 
work of producing as well as directing Shakespeare. I have run into a problem 
with scheduling rehearsals. When you pay people little or nothing, they need to 
have jobs. So I have to work around their schedules. Then I have scenes, which 
need rehearsing. What I have to contrive is a series of incidents of 
circumstance in which the person playing the part, is at rehearsal for the scene 
in which they are required, at the right time. I think it's called a pattern of 
permutations. I am not a computer person but I sallied forth with a database 
program to try to design something that would chew up all the data of baby sit 
times and Cassius in Scene 3 etc. The result was to have been something that 
produced a two month rehearsal schedule at a press of the return key. I almost 
went mad. I had to think in three different logical contexts at once and I 
cannot. It took hours of listening to Bach to put all the circles back in the 
round holes and all the squares back in the square holes. Bach is great for 
sanity. In any case, if anyone has any idea how to do this, I would be delighted 
to hear about it. Right now, I just do it the slow way. This can be very 
frustrating.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Tom Salyers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Sunday, 27 Jul 2008 03:02:28 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 19.0442 Character/Scene/Line Breakdown Charts
Comment:    Re: SHK 19.0442 Character/Scene/Line Breakdown Charts

 >I think Tom Salyers is describing T. J. King's book, *Casting Shakespeare's
 >Plays* (Cambridge UP, 1992).
 >
 >Best,
 >John Cox
 >Hope College

Thanks for the suggestions, everyone. I think this book is the exact one I'm 
looking for. It seems to be out of print, but fortunately the local university 
library has a copy.

If anyone's curious, the reason I was trying to find this book is that I'm in 
the tedious data-entry phase of a project I'm working on in my spare time. It's 
an experiment in programmatically doubling roles in Shakespeare plays without 
all the tedium of manually poring over charts like the one in this book. I've 
finally got a prototype working on Windows with one test play--in that I got it 
to (for instance) stop doubling Dogberry and Verges--and I'm ready to expand it 
to the rest of the plays.

Tom Salyers


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

SHAKSPER Roundtable: Shakespeare's Intentions

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0451  Thursday, 31 July 2008

From:       Duncan Salkeld <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Saturday, 26 Jul 2008 12:20:56 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: 19.0433 SHAKSPER Roundtable: Shakespeare's Intentions
Comment:    Re: SHK 19.0433 SHAKSPER Roundtable: Shakespeare's Intentions

David Schalkwyk identifies very clearly why I have urged the appeal to intention 
as an occasional necessity: 'to determine the factual details of a text 
independently of a favorite interpretation of that text' [and] 'to prevent a 
settled signified derived independently of what the author wanted as a signifier 
from determining the signifier that he could well have wanted'. But I do so not 
to freeze the text into a timeless rigid structure determined solely by its 
genius-author but simply as a way of acknowledging evident signs of its 
historical moment. To this end, may I cite a few brief examples of topical 
allusion as an indication of authorial intent?

1.
Were now the general of our gracious empress,
As in good time he may, from Ireland coming,
Bringing rebellion broached on his sword,
How many would the peaceful city quit,
To welcome him! (Henry V, 5.0.29-34)

If this is an allusion to the Earl of Essex (as most editors and critics 
concur), then it dates the play to between January and June 1599. On 27 March, 
Essex had left England for his Ireland expedition. By summer of that year, it 
was already clear that the venture would fail (see Oxford ed., 1982, 5). So in 
this instance, the intentionality clearly matters for our knowledge of the play..

2. 				
	... there is, sir, an aery of children, little eyases,
	that cry out on the top of question, and are most
	tyrannically clapped for't:    (Hamlet, 2.2.339-42)

If this is an allusion to the boys who played at Blackfriars from Michaelmas 
1600, as most editions accept, then at least part of its historical 
interest/significance lies in the fact that it dates the play to around this 
time (see Arden 2 ed., 1982, 1-2).

3. 'Go get thee to Yaughan. Fetch me a stoup of liquor' (Hamlet, 5.1.60-1, Folio 
text only)

Here the intention is unclear. Oxford and Norton editors emend 'Yaughan' to 
'Johan', following Brinsley Nicholson's suggestion in 1871 that this 'Johan' 
might be a foreign alehouse keeper. Nicholson suggested 'Johan' might be a Dutch 
version of a name Jonson uses in The Alchemist, 'Deaf John'. Given that 'Johan' 
is a very common Elizabethan spelling of 'Joan', an argument for emending 
'Yaughan' to 'Johan' is an argument for rendering 'Johan' as 'Joan' for modern 
readers and audiences. In as much as we don't know what 'Yaughan' means or 
refers to, the obscurity arrests what we can make of it: intention thus matters 
even when unclear.

4. When Jonson refers to 'Deaf John' in The Alchemist (1.1.85), he alludes 
(deliberately) to an historical figure, a man who was 'comon about the house' in 
the Bridewell Hospital (31 January 1600). A note recorded on Saturday 22 
December 1604 states,'It is ordered yt deffe John a poore man in this house 
shall have a canvass dublett & a paire of hose'. His food allowance each day was 
eight ounces of bread, a fifth of a pound of beef, a mess of porridge and a 
quart of beer for dinner, with a little extra beef for supper. By 7 May 1606, he 
was dead: 'Murrey the officer to have the Romes wch deaf John hadd the said John 
beinge dead And he must pay iiiis a yeare to the Trer [Treasurer] by xiid a 
quarter.'

5. Jonson makes reference to another historical figure in Bartholomew Fair. Wasp 
snipes at Mistress Overdo. 'Good Lord!  How sharp you are, with being at Bedlam 
yesterday!  Whetstone has set an edge upon you, has he?' (1.5.22-23). Here 
Jonson alludes to William Whetstone, a disturbed young man notorious for 
outbursts in public places and kept at Bethlem Hospital. A census of inmates on 
28 June 1624 records that, 'William Whetston hath been here about 18 yeares & is 
fitt to be kepte'. He died the following year. It makes sense to infer that 
Jonson intended his some of his audience to 'get the joke'.

Details of (4) and (5) are available in _The Review of English Studies_ 2005 56 
(225): 379-385. One can claim either that these 'signs of historical moment' are 
intended topical allusions or (less plausibly) unintended slips of the pen but 
it makes no sense to argue that they are 'non-intended', as if to imagine they 
bear no relation of any kind to authorial intention. 'Nor does it make sense to 
hold that adducing such material perpetuates 'fantasies' of authorial intention 
(see the CFP). David might perhaps allow that here intention is 'inescapable', 
though he may also think it redundant. If so, I can agree with him on the first 
part but not (at least not very much) on the second.


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

Wordle and Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0449  Thursday, 31 July 2008

From:       Martin Mueller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Saturday, 26 Jul 2008 20:38:37 -0500
Subject:    Wordle and Shakespeare

There is a new visualization tool by Jonathan Feinberg, an IBM programmer. It is 
called Wordle and turns text into word clouds (http://wordle.net). It works by 
counting the words in a text and mapping the size of letters to the word count 
in the text. I did this with Othello and you can see the results at 
http://wordle.net/gallery/wrdl/89986/Othello

Phil Burns, a colleague of mine in Academic Technologies, managed to feed Wordle 
with the output of a statistical routine that compares the frequencies of 
Othello (or any other play) with the frequencies of Shakespeare as a whole. We 
have used this routine (Dunning's log likelihood ratio) in WordHoard for quite a 
while (http://wordhoard.northwestern.edu)

There are two visualizations, one with names and the other without names, at

http://wordle.net/gallery/wrdl/90536/Othello_Lemmata_vs._Shakespeare_
http://wordle.net/gallery/wrdl/90759/Othello_lemmata_(names_excluded)_vs._Shakespeare

They are quite striking

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

Iagogo

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0450  Thursday, 31 July 2008

From:       Charles Weinstein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Sunday, 27 Jul 2008 11:01:38 -0400
Subject:    Iagogo

Naxos has released an audio recording of the Donmar Warehouse's recent 
production of Othello, starring Chiwetel Ejiofor as the Moor and Ewan McGregor 
as his Ancient. As an aural experience, the production is largely dull; the only 
thing worth mentioning (briefly) is McGregor. Young, cheerful, well-spoken, and 
winning, McGregor is the most charming Iago I have encountered in any medium. 
For awhile, that is very nearly enough. One understands why people like and 
trust this man; one also understands why no one takes him seriously as 
lieutenant material. But as the play progresses and Iago's cruelty deepens, 
McGregor's unvarying amiability seems incongruous. A strange counter-textual 
interpretation emerges, reminiscent of Auden's trickster theory but with a 
striking twist of its own. In brief, Iago tries to play a harmless joke on 
Othello, only to see the results spiral giddily out of control. The poor man is 
forced to improvise desperately as he struggles to resolve the mess he 
unwittingly created. Iago as the Boy who Cried Adulteress, a feckless but 
innocent victim of events:  now there's a novel take on the play, and I'm 
indebted to McGregor for suggesting it.

--Charles Weinstein

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

Globe Education Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0448  Thursday, 31 July 2008

From:       Katharine Grice <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Thursday, 31 Jul 2008 11:10:01 +0100
Subject:    Globe Education Conference

'Outside In / Inside Out: Shakespeare, the Globe and the Blackfriars'
Globe Education Conference 24-26 October 2008

Globe Education at Shakespeare's Globe is organising a major conference in 
October in honour of Professor Andrew Gurr and to mark the 400th anniversary of 
the re-acquisition of the Blackfriars Playhouse. The event, which is being 
organised in partnership with the Blackfriars Theatre in Staunton, Virginia, 
will bring together renowned scholars and theatre practitioners in the field of 
Shakespeare and his playhouses to consider plays that were written for outdoors 
theatres that transferred to indoor theatres and vice versa.

Professor Andrew Gurr, Emeritus Professor of English at the University of 
Reading and former Director of Research at Shakespeare's Globe is a leading 
theatre historian of the Shakespeare period and was instrumental in the research 
behind the building of the new Globe, and this was recognised by him receiving 
the Sam Wanamaker Award this year. He will give the Theo Crosby Fellowship 
Lecture to open the conference on 23 October.

  Director of Globe Education, Patrick Spottiswoode, said: "Globe Education runs 
an annual conference that seeks to bring theatre scholars and theatre 
practitioners together to share their differing perspectives on plays and 
playhouses of the late 16th and early 17th centuries. It is fitting that this 
year's conference should focus on the Blackfriars Playhouse and is being held to 
celebrate the work of Andrew Gurr. The 400th anniversary of the Blackfriars 
provides us with an opportunity to reflect on the impact of moving to an indoor 
theatre for winter performances at a time when the Shakespeare's Globe is 
planning to build an indoor Jacobean Playhouse alongside the Globe. It also 
provides us with an opportunity to celebrate the work of one of the most 
influential theatre scholars who has also been one of the most significant 
advisers to the Globe for over 30 years."

In 1596 James Burbage converted part of an old monastery in Blackfriars into an 
indoor theatre. This was a small, candlelit space meant to entertain the 
wealthiest citizens and aristocracy. Shakespeare's company moved into this 
theatre in 1609 and may have performed exclusively there in the winter and at 
the Globe in the summer. The Blackfriars Theatre in Stanton is a re-creation of 
this theatre. The second part of the conference will be held there in Autumn 2009.

The conference programme will include sessions with John Astington, Ralph Cohen, 
Claire van Kampen, Frank Hildy, Ros Knutson, Michael Hattaway, Lucy Munro, and 
Mark Rylance.

At the end of the conference weekend, the first of four of a season of Globe 
Education's Read Not Dead staged readings will be performed. All four plays were 
written for indoor playhouses.

Conference tickets cost ?100 and are available by calling the Box Office on +44 
(0)20 7401 9919.

ENDS

Further information from Katharine Grice on 020 7902 1468 or Fran Eyles on 020 
7902 1491 or email 
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.<mailto:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.

Notes to Editors

  * Globe Education offers workshops, lectures, and evening courses to students 
of all ages. It has a burgeoning research department led by Dr Farah 
Karim-Cooper. For further information, telephone 020 7902 1433.

  * Globe Theatre 2008 Season Totus Mundus, includes Shakespeare's King Lear, A 
Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merry Wives of Windsor and Timon of Athens as well 
as two new plays, The Frontline and Liberty. Tickets are available on 020 7401 
9919 / 020 7087 7398 or via 
www.shakespeares-globe.org<http://www.shakespeares-globe.org/>and range in price 
from ?5 to ?33.

  * Shakespeare's Globe Exhibition is open daily - May to September from 9am to 
5pm and October to April from 10am to 5pm. Admission includes a guided tour of 
the Theatre. For further information, telephone 020 7902 1500.

  * Shakespeare's Globe Shop stocks a variety of products, including season 
specific merchandise. Shakespeare's Globe is a registered charity and all 
profits from sales go towards supporting our educational mission. Items can be 
bought at the onsite shop or online at www.globe-shop.com

  * The Shakespeare Globe Trust is a registered charity No.266916. The Globe 
receives no public subsidy.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.