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Home :: Archive :: 2008 :: July ::
CFPs Medieval and Renaissance Drama Kalamazoo 09
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0393  Saturday, 12 July 2008

From:       Carolyn Coulson-Grigsby <
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Date:       Saturday, 12 Jul 2008 11:30:51 -0400
Subject:    CFPs Medieval and Renaissance Drama Kalamazoo 09

Please excuse the length and any cross-postings!

Four MRDS-sponsored sessions
International Medieval Congress in Kalamazoo, Michigan
May 7-10, 2009

The Medieval and Renaissance Drama Society invites abstracts for the following 
four sessions to be held at International Medieval Congress in Kalamazoo, 
Michigan, May 7-10, 2009. One-page abstracts may be sent directly to the 
individual organizers of each session, as identified below. Submission deadline 
is September 15, 2008, but potential presenters are encouraged to submit 
abstracts earlier.

1. Renaissance Medievalisms in Performance

As Chris Brooks suggests, the Renaissance inherited the Middle Ages both as a 
material presence and as a complex of ideas and feelings-both real and 
imaginary. This panel seeks papers that examine how Renaissance communities 
constructed, evaluated, mythologized, or re-imagined the Middle Ages through 
performance. Although dramatic texts offer us evidence of such cultural work, 
this panel also invites papers that identify and analyze "medievalisms" in 
staging practices, patronage, acting styles, design choices, and other 
theatrical elements. Papers that address non-English contexts are welcome.

Organizer: Jill Stevenson, Marymount Manhattan College, Theatre Dept, 

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2. Messengers & Advisors in Medieval Drama:

Medieval dramatic depictions of messengers and advisors invite scholarly inquiry 
into many areas, including power and gender dynamics between a speaker and 
his/her audience; the epistemological implications of the spoken and written 
word; notions of space and movement in performance; and physical and verbal 
interactions among the players, and between players and audience. Proposals 
examining English and continental drama are welcome.

Organizer: Frank Napolitano, Dept of English, University of Connecticut, 

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3. "Strictly Academic?": School and Learned Drama, Late-Medieval through 
Renaissance

Many surviving early dramatic texts were produced in learned monastic settings, 
by household chapel/choir school or grammar school masters, by university 
students, or by post-graduate scholars such as those of the Christian Terence 
movement (both on the Continent and in England). Thereafter, the famed 
"University Wits" pioneered the commercial drama of the Elizabethan era and 
performance in the law schools (Inns of Court) continued through the 
Renaissance. Accordingly, early school and learned drama had an enormous 
influence not just on the development of early theatre but on its very survival 
and existence. For that reason, recent discoveries and approaches warrant 
reexamination of the many traditions of academic drama.

Organizer: Bob Hornback, Dept of English, Oglethorpe U, 
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4. The Material Culture of French Medieval Drama: In Memory of Graham Runnalls

As Alan Knight wrote in a review of one of Runnalls' books, "Since the work of 
Petit de Julleville in the 1880s, no-one has contributed more to the study of 
medieval French theatre history than Graham Runnalls." His work over more than 
thirty years ranged from editions of play texts to studies of manuscript 
typology and printing, and to his editorial work on archival materials about 
production and staging. His death in January 2008 at the age of 70 has been 
deeply felt by the Medieval Drama community, and it is fitting to honor him with 
this session.

Organizer: Mario Longtin, Dept. of French, University of Western Ontario. 

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  <mailto:
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Carolyn Coulson-Grigsby
Medieval and Renaissance Drama Society Secretary/Treasurer

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