2008

CFP: "Shakespeare's Drama and Authorial Intention"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0432  Thursday, 24 July 2008

From:       Cary DiPietro <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Wednesday, 23 Jul 2008 15:10:56 -0400
Subject:    CFP:  "Shakespeare's Drama and Authorial Intention"

Call for Papers:  Special issue of the journal _Style_ in collaboration with 
SHAKSPER: The Global Internet Shakespeare Conference on

"Shakespeare's Drama and Authorial Intention"

Issue Guest-editor: Cary DiPietro
Deadline for Submission: 31 October 2008

In a landmark 1946 article for the _Sewanee Review_ (later republished in _The 
Verbal Icon_), William K. Wimsatt and Monroe C. Beardsley proclaimed authorial 
intention a fallacy. In doing so, they not only invented a critical terminology 
for literary interpretation, but also concretized the relationship between the 
literary text and a textual referent that is always belated by its critical 
post-ness, a referent that is, to borrow a phrase from Roland Barthes, "always 
already dead." But sixty years on, how "dead" is authorial intention?

While it might seem that the critical assertions of the new critics and later 
poststructuralists have permanently decentred Shakespeare as a single and 
originating source of meaning for the body of writing the name metonymically 
represents, fantasies of his authorship persist, and they do so tenaciously. 
Despite the death of the author, Shakespeare lives on in the edited texts that 
bear his name, corrected by editors to ideal authorial texts from the early 
printed texts that have descended to us, "corrupted" by early printing practices 
and theatrical transmission. He lives in the theatre, where directors and actors 
seek to excavate an intentional ideal in the living medium of performance. He 
persists even more discreetly in a critical paradigm dominated by the 
historian's concern for material traces of an initial or originating context. 
The persistence of intention as a discrete field within different textual 
practices demonstrates that, far from having been exhausted or answered by 
contemporary criticism, questions about Shakespeare's dramatic authorship and 
his intended meanings, though unfashionable, remain important cruces.

Papers are invited for a special issue of the journal _Style_ addressing the 
topic of Shakespeare's drama and authorial intention. This issue is a 
continuation of a collaboration with SHAKSPER: The Global Internet Shakespeare 
Conference, and follows a special Roundtable discussion held between April and 
July 2008, which can be read here (follow the "thread" link to read subsequent 
digests):

  http://www.shaksper.net/archives/2008/0199.html

Contributors are invited to address any aspect of dramatic authorship or 
intention to the understanding of Shakespeare's dramatic writing. Contributors 
may wish to consider such questions as:

- does authorial intention retain any utility for the discussion of literary 
meaning or textual understanding in the wake of theory and cultural studies?

- does Shakespeare as a canonical and culturally central figure represent a 
special or distinct field of enquiry?

- how does authorial intention inform or how might further discussions of 
intention be informed by textual practices such as editing and performance?

- how have debates about authorial intention been shaped by changing critical 
and institutional practices over the past sixty years, and what role might they 
play, if any, in the changing profession?

- how might authorial intention be redeployed from narrative studies for the 
drama or, alternatively, how might discussions of early modern dramatic 
authorship inform or reposition narrative studies?

Essays in the range of 3000 to 6000 words and conforming to MLA guidelines 
should be submitted to Cary DiPietro (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) no later than 
31 October 2008. Expressions of interest or informal enquiries are also welcome.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

Roger Rees' Shakespeare Show

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0431  Thursday, 24 July 2008

From:       Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Thursday, July 24, 2008
Subject:    Roger Rees' Shakespeare Show

FROM: San Francisco Chronicle Online

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2008/07/22/DDQL11S9F7.DTL

Roger Rees' Shakespeare Show
Robert Hurwitt, Chronicle Theater Critic
Tuesday, July 22, 2008

What You Will: One-man show. Created and performed by Roger Rees. (Through Aug. 
9. American Conservatory Theater, 415 Geary St., San Francisco. 95 minutes. 
Tickets: $29-$85. Call (415) 749-2228 or go to www.act-sf.org.)

The best moment in playing Juliet is "the nanosecond when they offer you the 
part." One of the hardest lines to deliver in "Macbeth" is Malcolm's reaction 
when told his father has been brutally murdered: "Oh. By whom?" The worst thing 
about the "To be or not to be" soliloquy is delivering it immediately after 
making an entrance, with the whole audience knowing what you're about to say. It 
isn't just the offbeat insights into performing Shakespeare that make Roger 
Rees' "What You Will" an absolute delight. The anecdotes, drawn from 22 years 
with the Royal Shakespeare Company (the Juliet observation comes from former 
colleague Judi Dench), are terrific. The criticisms -- from the laments of young 
students to the venom of D.H. Lawrence and Voltaire -- range from amusing to 
hilarious. The Shakespeare speeches (and one sonnet) are delivered with mastery. 
And that's not even counting the outstanding passages from Charles Dickens and 
James Thurber. "Will," which opened Monday for a limited run at American 
Conservatory Theater, is a treat for lovers of Shakespeare and those who may 
have felt daunted, bored or confused by him alike. Created by Rees last year for 
the Folger Theatre in Washington, D.C., and reprised at Massachusetts' 
Williamstown Theatre (where he was artistic director), "Will" is a distinct 
departure from the great-speeches solo shows made famous by John Gielgud or the 
autobiographical approach of Lynn Redgrave's "Shakespeare for My Father." Rees 
offers snippets of his life -- childhood in Wales; spear-carrying with Ben 
Kingsley in their early RSC years; his first tiny speaking roles; a moment with 
Laurence Olivier when they were filming "The Ebony Tower."

He more than does justice to speeches ranging from the "muse of fire" from 
"Henry V," Macbeth's dagger vision and Hamlet's "To be" and "rogue and peasant 
slave" soliloquies (Rees holds the Stratford-Upon-Avon record for playing 
Hamlet) to both a smitten adolescent Romeo and garrulous old Nurse from "Romeo 
and Juliet." But it's the way he sets up these passages that distinguishes 
"Will" as much as his trippingly-on-the-tongue delivery. Whether citing online 
student complaints and commentaries about the Bard and his "Islamic pentameter" 
or anecdotes about David Garrick's special-effects wig or Edmund Kean's preshow 
sexual needs, Rees uses a continuous flow of humor to set up the dramatic 
moments. A casual, charming figure in a loose shirt and brown slacks - framed by 
Alexander V. Nichols' theatrical-clutter set and moody lighting - he slips into 
the characters with an ease as comfortable as it is transparent.

He's more obviously acting in quick impersonations of Voltaire or George Bernard 
Shaw than in the Shakespeare passages. His rendition of a Dickens scene from 
"Great Expectations" is touching and cleverly crafted. His take on Thurber's 
"The Macbeth Murder Mystery" is a comic gem.

By contrast, his Hamlet, Macbeth, Richard II and Lear seem easy and natural. 
Rees uses his humorous, colloquial framework not just to increase the dramatic 
intensity and highlight the beauty of his Shakespeare, but to demystify it as 
well. "Will" makes Shakespeare as familiar as breathing, which is yet another 
beguiling aspect to Rees' delightful show.

http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2008/07/22/DDQL11S9F7.DTL


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

Golden Ear Final Report

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0429  Tuesday, 22 July 2008

[1] From:   Bob Grumman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Monday, 21 Jul 2008 10:03:11 -0500
     Subt:   Re: SHK 19.0422 Golden Ear Final Report

[2] From:   Robert Projansky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Tuesday, 22 Jul 2008 06:03:35 -0700
     Subt:   Re: SHK 19.0422 Golden Ear Final Report


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Bob Grumman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Monday, 21 Jul 2008 10:03:11 -0500
Subject: 19.0422 Golden Ear Final Report
Comment:    Re: SHK 19.0422 Golden Ear Final Report

I doubt that many testees cheated. My problem with the test is that it seems to 
me to have been a golden memory test rather than a golden ear test. Specialists 
in Shakespeare's plays will likely have been so submerged in his works as to be 
able to recognize just about any passage from them not because of their 
Shakespearean style but because they remember the specific passage. Such a 
person might come on a passage that sounds like first-rate Shakespeare and know 
it isn't by him because, had it been, they'd have remembered so good a passage. 
A real specialist would recognize who wrote most Shakespearean-sounding passages 
that weren't by Shakespeare, too. Only a fool, I contend, would claim no one 
ever wrote at Shakespeare's level, in Shakespeare's style, but he. So my 
argument is that a genuine golden ear not combined with a golden memory would be 
more apt to mistake non-Shakespearean passages for his than a golden memory 
would. The results of the test, from this point of view, then, are not evidence 
in favor of the validity of stylometrics (though I think that for much longer 
passages, stylometrics will eventually prove valid).

--Bob G.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Robert Projansky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 22 Jul 2008 06:03:35 -0700
Subject: 19.0422 Golden Ear Final Report
Comment:    Re: SHK 19.0422 Golden Ear Final Report

Janet Costa wrote:

 >Can someone give me the phonetic spelling for a "Bronx cheer???"

Yes:

Ham.
Buzze, buzze.

Bob Projansky

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

RT: Shakespeare's Intentions Reactions

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0430  Tuesday, 22 July 2008

From:       John E. Perry <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Monday, 21 Jul 2008 01:33:30 -0400
Subject: 19.0421 RT: Shakespeare's Intentions Reactions
Comment:    Re: SHK 19.0421 RT: Shakespeare's Intentions Reactions

Hardy M. Cook wrote:

 >[Editor's Note: Let me interrupt here to solicit suggestions for
 >Roundtable #3. What would you, John, and other non-Shakespearean members
 >of the list like to study in depth in the Roundtable format?

Hm. The question of presentism came out of a clear blue sky for me; while I had 
heard matters of this sort discussed before, I hadn't known that there were 
lines drawn and sides joined in battle over the question. That revelation was 
one of the minor benefits of the first Roundtable for me.

The idea that we couldn't really know the true intent of the author was present 
in some of my education and studies, but I'd never heard an intensive discussion 
of the matter, and some of my ideas and opinions were refined by the second 
Roundtable.

Both of these were matters I could never have raised on my own, and I hesitate 
to try to come up with any, now. But Professor Urkowitz's idea that 
Shakespeare's progress in developing his plays can be traced through the quartos 
is intriguing. And, since I understand from comments made during the discussions 
that his idea was either dismissed without refutation or simply ignored, it 
seems that, handled well, this topic could make Shaksper a research forum, more 
than just a discussion forum (I emphasize _just_ as opposed to _merely_).

 >... And once again, my congratulations
 >and sincerest thanks to Cary DiPietro for a job well done. -Hardy]

And mine, and belatedly to Professor Grady.

[Editor's Note: And I too repeat my congratulations for a job well done to Hugh. 
-Hardy]

John Perry

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

Question: Appropriate Quotation

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0428  Tuesday, 22 July 2008

[1] From:   Rebecca Gillis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Monday, 21 Jul 2008 13:19:15 +0300
     Subt:   Twisting the Knife

[2] From:   Hugh Grady <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Monday, 21 Jul 2008 09:47:59 -0400
     Subt:   RE: SHK 19.0419 Question: Appropriate Quotation

[3] From:   John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Monday, 21 Jul 2008 14:58:05 +0100
     Subt:   RE: SHK 19.0419 Question: Appropriate Quotation

[4] From:   Alan Pierpoint <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Monday, 21 Jul 2008 12:25:10 -0400
     Subt:   Re: SHK 19.0419 Question: Appropriate Quotation

[5] From:   Mari Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Monday, 21 Jul 2008 15:11:43 -0400
     Subt:   Re: SHK 19.0419 Question: Appropriate Quotation


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Rebecca Gillis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Monday, 21 Jul 2008 13:19:15 +0300
Subject:    Twisting the Knife

How about "For Brutus is an honourable man" (Julius Caesar III.2.79)

Rebecca Gillis

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Hugh Grady <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Monday, 21 Jul 2008 09:47:59 -0400
Subject: 19.0419 Question: Appropriate Quotation
Comment:    RE: SHK 19.0419 Question: Appropriate Quotation

What comes to mind is not Shakespeare but Pope and Dryden. What about Pope's 
famous couplet,

    "Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer,
     And, without sneering, teach the rest to sneer."

         Pope: Epistle to Arbuthnot.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Monday, 21 Jul 2008 14:58:05 +0100
Subject: 19.0419 Question: Appropriate Quotation
Comment:    RE: SHK 19.0419 Question: Appropriate Quotation

Try Macbeth:  'False face doth hide what the false heart doth know'

Cheers,
John Drakakis

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Alan Pierpoint <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Monday, 21 Jul 2008 12:25:10 -0400
Subject: 19.0419 Question: Appropriate Quotation
Comment:    Re: SHK 19.0419 Question: Appropriate Quotation

" . . . one may smile, and smile, and be a villain . . . "? Act I, scene v.? 
-Alan Pierpoint

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Mari Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Monday, 21 Jul 2008 15:11:43 -0400
Subject: 19.0419 Question: Appropriate Quotation
Comment:    Re: SHK 19.0419 Question: Appropriate Quotation

 >"Is there a quote that captures the idea of speaking kind words  while
 >thrusting in the knife -- that is, empty rhetoric combined with aggression?
 >Perhaps from one of the political plays?"

My instant response: Hamlet 1.5:

O villain, villain, smiling, damned villain!
My tables, -- meet it is I set it down,
That one may smile, and smile, and be a villain;
At least I'm sure it may be so in Denmark:

Mari Bonomi

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

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