2008

SPECIAL REQUEST: London Suggestions

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0391  Saturday, 12 July 2008

From:       Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Saturday, July 12, 2008
Subject: SPECIAL REQUEST: London Suggestions
Comment:    SHK 19.0390 SPECIAL REQUEST: London Suggestions

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

Thank you to all who replied to my request.

I have managed to book a room in a hotel not far from the New Globe; I shall 
still probably arrange transportation since walking longer than a block or two 
is difficult for me.

I have received many excellent suggestions about transportation options for 
which I am extremely grateful. Over the next couple of days, I will finalize my 
plans for getting around London and from London to Stratford and from Stratford 
back to Heathrow.

I am astonished though about my purchasing tickets, or rather not purchasing 
tickets. I have NOT been able to get a ticket for the 2:00 pm matinee for Merry 
Wives, even though yesterday there appeared to be many tickets available.

I have purchased a ticket for the 7:30 evening performance of Lear, but again I 
was extremely disappointed that there had appeared to be so many better seats 
available yesterday. Perhaps I was not reading the web site ticket maps as 
accurately as I should have.

I guess I will spend the day at the Tate Modern, one of my favorite places in 
London. Rebecca and I had a terrific time two years ago at the "Kandinsky: The 
Path to Abstraction" exhibition. During my undergraduate days, I hung out with a 
lot of artists and other non-conformists -- radical, unconventional bohemians, 
aging beats and youthful hippy types -- those who populated the fringes of 
society and who explored the avant garde, the innovative and the experimental. 
By trying to escape from the mental and artistic confines of my pathetically 
suburban, middle-class upbringing, I came to love what goes by the name of 
"modern art" and those who make it and those who enjoy its innovative and humor 
view of life. Thus, I will not be terrible disappointed about not seeing Merry 
Wives; instead I shall lose myself for four or five hours in the Tate Modern.

Once again, thanks to all who helped me put my 2008 day in London together.

Hardy


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Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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Five-year-olds to Study Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0389  Thursday, 10 July 2008

From:       Virginia Byrne <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 8 Jul 2008 07:45:07 EDT
Subject: 19.0383  Five-year-olds to Study Shakespeare
Comment:    Re: SHK 19.0383  Five-year-olds to Study Shakespeare

Zounds! It's about time.

Virginia Byrne


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

Film Review Cluster Deadline Extended

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0387  Thursday, 10 July 2008

From:       Alexander Huang <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 8 Jul 2008 14:56:31 -0400
Subject:    UPDATE: Film Review Cluster Deadline Extended

DEADLINE EXTENDED TO 15 AUGUST 2008. Reviews of Maqbool are especially welcome.

The Banquet and Maqbool: A Film Review Cluster, edited by Alexander Huang for 
Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation 
(http://www.borrowers.uga.edu)

Reviews of Maqbool (Macbeth, India, 2004), and/or The Banquet (Ye Yan, aka The 
Legend of Black Scorpion), a 2006 Chinese film adaptation of Hamlet are invited. 
Both films, with English subtitles, have been released on DVD.

The review cluster is an innovative, multimedia forum for performance reviews 
offering multiple perspectives. Multiple reviews of the same two films are 
sought. The journal encourages contributors to use the online format to its best 
advantage, in particular, by imagining how to enhance or illustrate their essays 
with multimedia (screen captures, video clips, etc.). The cluster editor and the 
journal's technical support team will be happy to prepare clips from the two 
films to accompany the reviews.

To learn more about the review cluster, please refer to "Quinnopolis vs. Hamlet: 
A Review Cluster" in Borrowers and Lenders 2.1 (Spring/  Summer 2006): 
http://lachesis.english.uga.edu/cocoon/borrowers/21_index

Reviews of 500 to 3,000 words are due on 15 August 2008. Email reviews to Alex 
Huang (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

Something Rotten in Wisconsin and Minnesota

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0388  Thursday, 10 July 2008

From:       Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Thursday, July 10, 2008
Subject:    Something Rotten in Wisconsin and Minnesota

Something Is Rotten in the State of . . . Wisconsin?
By Jeffrey Freymann-Weyr

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=92029508

Yesterday, while I was waiting in line to get to a pump at COSTCO for some gas, 
I heard an interesting story on NPR about two new novels with parallels to 
Hamlet. At the NPR web site, you can hear the entire four-and-a-half-minute 
story and there are links to both authors' reading from their works as well as 
excepts in case you would like to read the selections on your own.

Here is the abbreviated web site version of the story that I heard:

Something Is Rotten in the State of . . . Wisconsin?
By Jeffrey Freymann-Weyr

All Things Considered, July 9, 2008 . Two new books this summer are bringing the 
storyline of Shakespeare's _Hamlet_ to the American Midwest. And while neither 
author says he set out to simply update Hamlet, both novels feature suspicion, 
betrayal and an uncle close at hand to offer help -- and more -- to his 
brother's widow.

Lin Enger's _Undiscovered Country_, which takes place in the fictional Northern 
Minnesota town of Battle Point, begins with what appears to be a hunting 
accident: A boy, Jesse Matson, hears a shot in the woods, runs toward it and 
discovers his father's dead body. It seems that his father committed suicide, 
but Jesse doesn't believe that's the case.

The scenario occurred to Enger more than a decade ago, as he was up in a tree, 
hunting deer with his brothers. When he realized that the scene mirrored the 
beginning of Hamlet, he decided to use the play as a starting point, he says, 
"to find out whether my character, given the same dilemma that Hamlet faces, 
would make similar decisions."

Novelist David Wroblewski also drew inspiration from the bard for _The Story of 
Edgar Sawtelle_, which he describes as an exercise in "how to subvert [Hamlet] 
as many ways as I could."

To wit: There's no trace of Elsinore castle in _The Story of Edgar Sawtelle_. 
Rather, Hamlet's family is moved to a Wisconsin farm, where Edgar, who was born 
mute, uses sign language to communicate with his parents and the dogs they breed 
and train. Wroblewski plays the character's silence against the hyper-verbal 
Hamlet.

"In Edgar's case, I wanted him to be hyper-observant," Wroblewski says. "And I 
felt that by subtracting the power of language, he would be a more believable 
and more potent observer of what's going on."

Wroblewski based the fictional Sawtelle farm on his own childhood home. His 
mother trained dogs on their 90-acre farm in Central Wisconsin. He describes his 
novel as "simply a love story between a boy and his dog," and he points to 
Rudyard Kipling's _Mowgli Stories_ about a boy living in the wild as another 
major influence.

"I think of . . . the relationship between Edgar's story and Hamlet's story as a 
re-folded piece of origami," he explains. "At one time, this was a perfectly 
executed origami crane. And I unfolded it and refolded it into a different 
shape. And when it's in that different shape -- say it's a frog now -- you can 
see a few feathers over here where no frog should have feathers."

Certainly the big themes of _Hamlet_ are able to withstand a lot of folding and 
re-folding. And the bard is no stranger to the American Midwest; Jane Smiley's 
Pulitzer Prize-winning novel _A Thousand Acres_ moved the story of _King Lear_ 
to a farm in Iowa.

Enger says Shakespeare is particularly adaptable because the conflicts that he 
chronicles -- between vengeance and justice, and vengeance and forgiveness -- 
are "probably the oldest moral dilemma that human beings face."

Wroblewski adds that all storytellers "take old stories, they change the 
proportions, they change the elements around, in ways that are meaningful to them."

Sometimes that means surrounding the prince of Denmark with a kennel full of 
dogs, or having him hunt deer from a tree in Minnesota.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

Grammatical "Errors" in Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 19.0386  Thursday, 10 July 2008

From:       Jonathan Hope <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 8 Jul 2008 10:57:19 +0100
Subject: 19.0384 Grammatical "Errors" in Shakespeare
Comment:    RE: SHK 19.0384 Grammatical "Errors" in Shakespeare

It is kind of people to mention my work in relation to this thread. Norman 
Blake's *A Grammar of Shakespeare's Language* is certainly longer and covers 
more than I do - in fact, the original questioner will find Blake's 'Conclusion' 
(pp. 326-331) very helpful with regard to prescriptivist comment on Shakespeare. 
As Norman notes there, Lowth's *Short Introduction to English Grammar* (1762) is 
a goldmine of this kind of thing, and Abbott (*A Shakespearian Grammar* 1870) 
has a run of paragraphs on 'Irregularities' - 406ff.

That may be as far as the questioner wants to go, but it is interesting to note, 
as a corrective to late C17th and C18th prescriptivism, that earlier grammars of 
English routinely, and matter of factly, included variable forms in their 
descriptions (see Terttu Nevalainen's excellent *Introduction to Early Modern 
English* (Edinburgh 2006) - chapter 2 - and the more detailed work of Ute Dons, 
*Descriptive Adequacy of Early Modern English Grammars* (2004: Mouton).

Jonathan Hope
Strathclyde University, Glasgow http://www.strath.ac.uk/english/courses/renaissance/

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

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