2009

Early Modern Culture

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0059  Wednesday, 18 February 2009

From:      David Siar <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:      Monday, 16 Feb 2009 19:48:07 -0500
Subject:   New Issue of Early Modern Culture

The new special issue of Early Modern Culture, entitled "Vagrant 
Subjects," is now on line at:

http://emc.eserver.org

Here is the index:

Linda Woodbridge:
Introduction

Patricia Fumerton:
"Mocking Aristocratic Place: The Perspective of the Streets"

Sandra Logan:
"Fright Flight and the Suffering City: Mobility, Catastrophe, and the 
State of Emergency"

Martine van Elk:
"'She would tell none other tale': Narrative Strategies in the Bridewell 
Court Books and the Rogue Literature of the Early Modern Period"

A. L. Beier:
"From the Organic Society to Utopian Civic Virtue: Reforming the Poor 
and Re-Forming the Social Order in England, 1500-1550"

Craig Dionne:
"'Now For the Lords' Sake': Vagrancy, Downward Mobility, and Low 
Aesthetics" (Response to Fumerton, Logan, van Elk, and Beier)

The Electronic Seminar

Patricia Fumerton:
Response to Craig Dionne

Sandra Logan:
Response to Linda Woodbridge and Craig Dionne

The Editors

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

DEEP: Database of Early English Playbooks

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0058  Wednesday, 18 February 2009

From:      Zachary Lesser <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:      Sunday, 8 Feb 2009 17:24:09 -0500
Subject:   DEEP: Database of Early English Playbooks

We are writing to invite you to use a new web resource for studying the 
printing, publishing, and marketing of early modern English drama, 
including Shakespeare. DEEP: Database of Early English Playbooks, 
created by Alan B. Farmer and Zachary Lesser, is an easy-to-use and 
highly customizable search engine of every playbook produced in England 
from the beginning of printing through 1660. DEEP provides a wealth of 
information about the original playbooks, their title-pages, paratextual 
matter, bibliographic details, and theatrical backgrounds. Because it 
makes this information available in an analytic database, DEEP allows 
you to study these playbooks easily and quickly in ways that are either 
impossible or highly time-consuming using earlier printed references or 
ESTC and EEBO.

Here are just a few examples of the kinds of questions that DEEP can 
quickly answer but that are difficult to research in any other way:

* Which plays were advertised as a "tragedy" on their title pages? or a 
"comedy"? or a "satire"?
* Which plays by Shakespeare advertised a performance at court or before 
the monarch?
* Which plays mention "God" on their title pages?
* What was the first playbook to include commendatory verses? or a 
dedication? or an address to the reader?
* Which plays were more likely to name an author on the title page, 
those printed in octavo or those printed in quarto?
* Which plays from the professional theater were printed with a list of 
errata?
* Which plays name their authors as "gentlemen" on the title page? or 
"student"? or "Minister"?
* How many civic pageants were printed with a woodcut or engraving? How 
many masques?
* Which plays published by Thomas Pavier named a playing company or a 
theater on their title pages? Which plays printed by Isaac or William 
Jaggard did the same?
* Which plays written before 1600 were still being printed after 1630?
* Which playbooks list both the Globe and the Blackfriars theaters on 
their title pages?
* How many plays from the professional theater were published from 1590 
to 1599 with a list of characters?  How many from 1600 to 1609?
* How many collections containing plays were published prior to Ben 
Jonson's Works in 1616?
* Which plays were advertised as being sold in St Dunstan's Churchyard? 
St Paul's Churchyard? Britain's Burse?

DEEP yields the answers to these questions and many, many others. DEEP 
currently contains 27 different search terms, which can be used in 
multiple combinations. The site is the result of research we have been 
conducting over the past eight years, but it has previously resided only 
on our own computers; we want to give other scholars the ability to use 
the information we have gathered, to enable further research in the 
history of printed drama.

A full Help section is available on the site. DEEP is free to all users.

DEEP is available at http://deep.sas.upenn.edu

Sincerely,
Alan B. Farmer and Zachary Lesser

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

SHAKSPER Is Back

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0056  Wednesday, 18 February 2009

From:       Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Wednesday, February 18, 2009
Subject:    SHAKSPER Is Back

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

My computer is repaired, and the cold I have been fighting is on the wane.

I have many announcements that I hope members will find exciting, but I 
will postpone them until I work my way through the backed up submissions 
in my INBOX.

Thanks for your patience.

Hardy M. Cook
Editor


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Obituary for Giorgio Melchiori

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0057  Wednesday, 18 February 2009

From:      Michele Marrapodi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:      Thursday, 12 Feb 2009 12:52:55 +0100
Subject:   Obituary for Giorgio Melchiori

Giorgio Melchiori, the most eminent scholar of Italian 'Anglistica', 
passed away peacefully on 7 February, at the age of 88. He was a 
Commander of the British Empire (CBE), a Fellow of the British Academy 
(FBA), Professor Emeritus of English Literature at the 'Rome Three' 
University, a Fellow of the Royal Academy, Accademia dei Lincei and 
Accademia delle Scienze (Turin), Life-Trustee Shakespeare Birthplace 
Trust, and Honorary Trustee International James Joyce Foundation. For 
his life-long critical activity he was generally acclaimed as one of the 
most distinguished and original Shakespearean scholars in the fields of 
both critical and textual investigation. He was also internationally 
known for his outstanding critical writings on Yeats and Joyce and many 
other British authors from the medieval to the modernist age, from the 
earliest Elizabethans to Dylan Thomas and beyond.

He was considered the most eclectic Shakespearean in Italy since he 
produced seminal contributions to the field of textual and comparative 
studies and interpretative commentary on Shakespeare and his 
contemporaries, employing diverse methodologies and critical viewpoints 
in relation to the aims and targets of his research. Among the critical 
perspectives adopted, Melchiori dealt variously and trenchantly with 
structuralism and semiotics, historical and neo-Marxist approaches, and 
formalist and textual analyses. He also undertook a successful, 
experimental harmonizing of a variety of critical methods to reach a 
pluralist interpretation of Shakespeare's Sonnets (Turin, 1973).

Among his extremely copious critical production, I would like to 
mention, listing only some of his most important volumes published 
outside Italy, The Tightrope Walkers: Studies of Mannerism in Modern 
English Literature (1956), The Whole Mystery of Arts: Patterns into 
Poetry in the Work of W.B. Yeats (1960), Shakespeare's Dramatic 
Meditations: An Experiment in Criticism (1976), and Shakespeare's Garter 
Plays (1994). As a textual scholar, he edited The Insatiate Countess 
(1984), King Edward III (1998), Sir Thomas More (2002), The Second Part 
of King Henry IV (2007), and The Merry Wives of Windsor (2000).

He also edited in nine volumes the most complete and updated bilingual 
edition of Shakespeare's plays, with Italian translations by different 
scholars, and provided new critical editions of the apocryphal plays 
Edward III and Sir Thomas More (Milan, 1976-91).

For all he gave us both as a scholar and as a man of letters he will be 
remembered for ever not only by those who personally knew him and were 
honoured to be graced with his friendship, teaching, and generous 
collaboration but also by the whole international community of 
Renaissance students and scholars who have learnt from the brilliancy of 
his wide expertise and intense humanity.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Just One of Those Days, Weeks, Months . . .

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0055  Saturday,  7 February 2009

From:       Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Saturday, February 07, 2009
Subject:    Just One of Those Days, Weeks, Months . . .

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

As some of you undoubtedly have noticed, I have times at which I feel 
that everything that can go wrong will.

With that thought in mind, I have for many, many months now been 
building what I consider my "Dream" PC, a PC with components and 
software constructed to work at speeds and reliability rivaling any 
other platform, excepting supercomputers buried in secure underground 
chambers in Switzerland or mountains in Colorado. Well, this is a dream, 
skeptics out there.

With the exception of installing several dozens remaining programs, I 
was preparing early last week to put the finishing touch in place by 
installing a multiple, internal card reader with four more USB ports and 
another FireWire port after purchasing and rejecting several similar 
5.25" cards.

Everything was ready; my son-in-law, Bill, and I had checked and 
re-checked that all of the cables were properly connected to the 
motherboard; more than a year's worth of planning, purchasing each 
device individually, assembling, checking, reassembling, mixing, 
matching, plugging, unplugging, we were ready; Bill plugged in the power 
cable and I pushed the start button and we were greeted with smoke 
shooting forth from the second of the four new USB ports, accessible 
from the front of this gorgeous, shiny . . .

Hours and hours of testing and retesting confirmed that we had done the 
virtually impossible, fried a gaming motherboard, an ASUS Crosshair that 
was designed for abuse by the most zealous of over-clockers.

I searched the Internet, eventually locating what I hope is an identical 
or nearly identical replacement for the motherboard that a year ago was 
the best in its class and now is surpassed by the bigger and better, the 
faster and the more effective, yet another lesson in obedience and the 
futility of striving for the best of its kind. I learned that by the 
time I finish an Internet search, something better will be out there.

Readers must be trying to imagine what purpose there is for this 
Sisyphustic narrative of despair. Well . . .

I am trying to explain, yet another interruption in the flow of SHAKSPER 
digests.

I recently saw a PBS documentary series on American humor. In it, Billy 
Crystal quotes from Mel Brooks: "When I cut my finger, it's a tragedy. 
When you fall down a manhole and die, it's comedy."

I hope my most recent slip on a banana peel, explains and perhaps 
entertains a little until fix my latest technical glitch and regain 
access to the files on my hard drive (1.81 TB RAID configuration with . . .

Hardy


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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