2009

Call for Papers

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0109  Friday, 13 March 2009

From:      Ralph Alan Cohen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:      Thursday, March 12, 2009 5:16 PM
Subject:   Call for Papers

Call for Papers

The American Shakespeare Center, in partnership with Shakespeare's Globe 
in London, will host its fifth Blackfriars Conference, "Inside 
Out/Outside In," in honor of Andy Gurr in Staunton, Virginia, from 20-25 
October 2009. Registration fee includes tickets to the ASC productions 
of 1 Henry IV, Merry Wives, Titus Andronicus, Much Ado About Nothing, 
and The Rehearsal by George Villiers (et al); opening and closing 
banquets; a special presentation by the ASC actors honoring the work of 
Andy Gurr; and Paul's Menzer's Shakespeare on Ice, a play and cocktail 
party.

We are inviting proposals for papers on topics to do with early modern 
drama in performance, including but not restricted to the staging, 
texts, design, repertory, personnel, and the business of plays in early 
modern England. Paper presentations are limited to 10 minutes 
(presentation without actors) and to 13 minutes (presentations with ASC 
actors). Presenters should be aware that they will hear the sound of a 
thundersheet when two minutes remain and will exit pursed by a bear when 
time is out.

In order to submit a 300 word abstract and a short bio to Sarah Enloe, 
Director of Education, by 30 May 2009, go to the ASC website. Please 
include a brief statement saying whether or not you would be interested 
in having your work in a volume of Blackfriars Conference essays.


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
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editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Middle School Drama

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0108  Monday, 9 March 2009

From:      Lynn Brenner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:      Friday, 6 Mar 2009 23:33:50 EST
Subject: 20.0101 Middle School Drama
Comment:   Re: SHK 20.0101 Middle School Drama

"Our Town" is a wonderful play for middle-schoolers, and I think also 
belongs on any short list of great American plays.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
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The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare and Art - Brush with Science

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0106  Monday, 9 March 2009

From:      Jan Pick <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:      Saturday, 7 Mar 2009 09:25:36 -0000
Subject: 20.0098 Shakespeare and Art - Brush with Science
Comment:   RE: SHK 20.0098 Shakespeare and Art - Brush with Science

Hello everyone,

I picked up on the Shakespeare and Art as every March I teach sessions 
called exactly that. Students visit the historic house, Blakesley Hall 
in Yardley, Birmingham, England, and take part in sessions studying how 
artists have represented the plays since the 1700s. They then work in 
groups with a piece of text to create their own 'Shakespeare picture' 
that they realize using costume props and coloured drapes etc on a 'set' 
in the historic house attics! It is huge fun and many students have been 
reported as talking about it for weeks afterwards. I would add that I 
work with the low academic ability pupils as well as the more able and 
that the sessions and visit are free.

Best
Jan Pick

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

50 Best American Plays

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0107  Monday, 9 March 2009

[1]  From:   Michael Luskin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
      Date:   Friday, 6 Mar 2009 20:41:13 EST
      Subj:   Re: SHK 20.0102 50 Best American Plays

[2]  From:   Mari Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
      Date:   Friday, 6 Mar 2009 23:15:47 -0500
      Subj:   Re: SHK 20.0102 50 Best American Plays


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:      Michael Luskin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:      Friday, 6 Mar 2009 20:41:13 EST
Subject: 20.0102 50 Best American Plays
Comment:   Re: SHK 20.0102 50 Best American Plays

I didn't read the beginning of this thread so I am not sure if we are 
looking for the fifty best American plays or if we are looking for fifty 
plays that are apt for middle school children. I have two suggestions.

A long time ago, I was looking for a list of the fifty (note the number) 
most important papers in twentieth century physics. I happened to 
mention this to a research librarian at a major university; somehow, we 
started talking about what research librarians did, and how they could 
not possibly compile such a list. We made a bet, a good dinner, that she 
could produce a better list than I could. When the day came, I had come 
up with a list of about thirty papers, and that was all I could think 
of. But she gave me a list of fifty, not forty-nine or fifty-one seminal 
papers, which was the fodder for a graduate introduction to physics 
seminar for two decades. So I would ask a research librarian your 
question, their skill set includes finding things out that they know 
nothing about. I later found out that she thought that she had made a 
sucker bet with me.

Second, most states have a department of education and they have 
officers for different areas. Note that most departments of education 
have limited power, and do a lot of consulting. In particular, in 
Pennsylvania, the Department has a collection of people that set 
standards, advise school districts on curriculum, evaluate programs, 
advise on new test books, and so forth. I would call the ones in your 
state. I bet they could help.

I am not sure that collecting a list of the fifty best plays for middle 
school kids is such a great idea. I started taking my son to Shakespeare 
when he was about six. While he might not have been able to contribute 
much to this list, he did enjoy and get to love Shakespeare from an 
early age. On the other hand, his favorite characters were Macbeth, 
Richard III, and Malvolio, his least favorite character was Henry V. 
Maybe if kids are not told that they are not appropriate for middle 
schoolers, they will enjoy them.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:      Mari Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:      Friday, 6 Mar 2009 23:15:47 -0500
Subject: 20.0102 50 Best American Plays
Comment:   Re: SHK 20.0102 50 Best American Plays

I understood and passed by Charles Weinstein's comment, having 
experience of Charles's jaundiced eye.

But I would like to know why Mr. Zarela feels the same, that there are 
no "Best American plays."

(And I'd include The Crucible, Raisin in the Sunday, Long Day's Journey 
and Moon for the Misbegotten, Picnic, Our Town, and so many, many other 
wonderful plays . . . along with such musicals as South Pacific.  But my 
taste for the most part seems to hover around the middle third of the 
20th century, which is an injustice to all the fine playwrights both 
before and after.)

Mari Bonomi

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Elizabeth I and Autopsies

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0105  Monday, 9 March 2009

[1]  From:   Claire Bowditch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
      Date:   Saturday, 07 Mar 2009 17:57:15 +0000
      Subj:   Re: SHK 20.0100 Elizabeth I and Autopsies

[2]  From:   Eric Johnson-DeBaufre <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
      Date:   Sunday, 8 Mar 2009 14:04:16 -0400
      Subj:   Re: SHK 20.0100 Elizabeth I and Autopsies


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:      Claire Bowditch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:      Saturday, 07 Mar 2009 17:57:15 +0000
Subject: 20.0100 Elizabeth I and Autopsies
Comment:   Re: SHK 20.0100 Elizabeth I and Autopsies

 >I was once told about a text that apparently records that Elizabeth
 >I had an autopsy performed on (I think) one of her female attendants
 >who had died, in search of physical evidence imprinted on the dead
 >woman's heart that she had been in love. Can anyone identify a
 >source for this tale?


Dear Frank,

This source is referred to, and indeed quoted from, in Lesel Dawson, 
_Lovesickness and Gender in Early Modern English Literature_ (Oxford: 
Oxford University Press, 2008), pp. 16-17.

The accompanying footnote is very helpful and gives the details of the 
original source. A copy of the text is available on Google.

Hope that helps.
Best wishes
Claire Bowditch

Editor's Note: I'm glad to find another subscriber who has learned the 
useful joys of Google Books: 
http://books.google.com/books?id=2R4FVVm2ftEC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Lovesickness+and+Gender+in+Early+Modern+English+Literature#PPA17,M1 
-Hardy]

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:      Eric Johnson-DeBaufre <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:      Sunday, 8 Mar 2009 14:04:16 -0400
Subject: 20.0100 Elizabeth I and Autopsies
Comment:   Re: SHK 20.0100 Elizabeth I and Autopsies

Dear Professor Whigham,

The story you are referring to, I believe, occurs in a letter by Philip 
Gaudy written in 1600 regarding "Mistress Ratcliffe," one of the Queen's 
handmaidens. You can find a reference to this in Lesel Dawson's book 
_Lovesickness and Gender in Early Modern English Literature_ (Oxford UP, 
2008).

The woman "Mistress Ratcliffe," otherwise known as was Margaret 
Radclyffe, and a fuller version of her story (as contained in Gaudy's 
letter) can be found here:

http://familytree.ratcliffs.net/rad12.htm

Best wishes,
Eric Johnson-DeBaufre


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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