2009

John Pace

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0607  Tuesday, 15 December 2009

From:       Julia Griffin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Monday, 14 Dec 2009 16:22:53 -0500
Subject: 20.0599 John Pace
Comment:    Re: SHK 20.0599 John Pace

 >Anybody know anything about John Pace, jester to
 >the Duke of Norfolk?

Only that he was notoriously petty.

Julia Griffin

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Obit: Louis Marder

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0606  Tuesday, 15 December 2009

[Editor's Note: I have thoroughly enjoyed all of the Louis Marder 
stories that have been sent to the list and to me privately. Please keep 
them coming. He was a real piece of work, and his story deserves to be 
shared.  -- HMC]

[1] From:   Sue Marrone <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Monday, 14 Dec 2009 10:41:09 -0800 (PST)
     Subj:   SHK 20.0596 Obit: Louis Marder

[2] From:   Richard Knowles <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Monday, 14 Dec 2009 13:02:54 -0600
     Subj:   SHK 20.0596 Obit: Louis Marder

[3] From:   William Sutton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Tuesday, 15 Dec 2009 12:13:57 +0000 (GMT)
     Subj:   Re: SHK 20.0596 Obit: Louis Marder

[4] From:   Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Tuesday, 15 Dec 2009 13:17:00 -0500
     Subj:   Louis Marder


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Sue Marrone <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Monday, 14 Dec 2009 10:41:09 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Obit: Louis Marder
Comment:    SHK 20.0596 Obit: Louis Marder

I sat on the SSA board and had the pleasure of speaking to Dr. Marder at 
several performances. I remember on night after a performance of LEAR, 
we went out for a (literally) midnight snack. There we were until well 
into the wee hours of the night at a coffee shop on the corner of Santa 
Monica and Crescent Heights Blvds., with him prodding on if Lear's 
costume was correct or not. He simply had to debate is Lear would have 
had a button or hook-n-eye clasp at the neck line and would it or would 
it not contribute to his choking.

I will remember him fondly as a guy who absolutely loved Shakespeare and 
would love delving into various minutia that would have no resolution.

Louis had a nickname, which didn't befit a Shakespeare scholar. Perhaps 
someone else will remember it.

I hope, for his soul to rest in peace, that William Shakespeare really 
did write the plays. I also hope that WS will have place to hide as 
Louis chases him around asking even more questions.

Sue Marrone

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Richard Knowles <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Monday, 14 Dec 2009 13:02:54 -0600
Subject: Obit: Louis Marder
Comment:    SHK 20.0596 Obit: Louis Marder

Dear Hardy Cook,

I enjoyed your obit for Louis Marder, an old friend; Runyonesque indeed. 
Don't I recall that one other scholarly project of his was reissuing all 
the old Furness Variorums with updated bibliographies, back in the 
sixties? I think the Folger has a set; they never sold as well as the 
Dover reprints of the originals, but the bibliographies were useful, 
despite many inaccuracies. He later came to contrast his proposed data 
Bank with the Variorum at every opportunity, though he remained vague 
about how contributions to it would be made and how its quality would be 
controlled. I can only wonder what he would have thought of Bob Turner's 
recent and superb Winter's Tale, available in PDF and soon online in XML?

Yours,
Richard Knowles

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       William Sutton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 15 Dec 2009 12:13:57 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: 20.0596 Obit: Louis Marder
Comment:    Re: SHK 20.0596 Obit: Louis Marder

I published my tenuously linked story about Louis on my blog 
http://blog.iloveshakespeare.com

and I also found a link to Louis' book online for those that can't find 
a copy to buy for their bookshelves.

http://www.archive.org/stream/hisexitsandhisen012888mbp/hisexitsandhisen012888mbp_djvu.txt

Yours,
Will

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 15 Dec 2009 13:17:00 -0500
Subject:    Louis Marder

I have many memories of Louis Marder. One concerns a collection he was 
designing of photographs of contemporary Shakespearean critics. When, as 
a lecturer, he alluded to one of these luminaries, he claimed that the 
relevant picture could -- and perhaps should -- be instantly displayed 
to the class. I remember him snapping the now almost blind J. Dover 
Wilson to this end, in the garden at the Shakespeare Institute in 
Stratford.

Terence Hawkes

_______________________________________________________________
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Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare in Hollywood, Asia and Cyberspace

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0604  Tuesday, 15 December 2009

From:       Alexander Huang <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Monday, 14 Dec 2009 14:04:24 -0500
Subject:    Shakespeare in Hollywood, Asia and Cyberspace

Just in time for holiday reading!

Shakespeare in Hollywood, Asia and Cyberspace, edited by Alexander C.Y. 
Huang and Charles S. Ross, has been published by Purdue University 
Press, 2009.   297 pages.

Paperback, $39.95 with FREE shipping through Amazon.com

Contributors include: David Bevington, Peter Holland, Richard Burt, 
Christy Desmet, Sujata Iyengar, and others.

ISBN: 978-1557535290

http://www.amazon.com/Shakespeare-Hollywood-Cyberspace-Alexander-Huang/dp/1557535299

Also available on Amazon.co.uk; Amazon.de; Amazon.fr (free shipping)


Book Description:

Recent decades have witnessed diverse incarnations and bold sequences of 
Shakespeare on screen and stage. Hollywood films and a century of Asian 
readings of plays such as Hamlet and Macbeth are now conjoining in 
cyberspace, making a world of difference to how we experience 
Shakespeare. The result is a new creativity that finds expression in 
different cultural and virtual locations, including recent films and 
MMOGs (massively multiplayer online games).

Shakespeare in Hollywood, Asia and Cyberspace examines how ideas of Asia 
operate in Shakespeare performances and how Asian and Anglo-European 
forms of cultural production combine to transcend the mode of inquiry 
that focuses on fidelity. The Introduction and 22 papers in the volume 
examine how Shakespeare became a signifier against which Asian and 
Western cultures defined -- and continue to define -- themselves.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Early Modern Women Vol 4 Now in Print!

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0605  Tuesday, 15 December 2009

From:       Early Modern Women <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 15 Dec 2009 11:27:03 -0500
Subject:    Early Modern Women Vol 4 Now in Print!

Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal is pleased to announce 
that Volume 4 is now in print and available for purchase.

Volume 4 includes essays by Joanne H. Wright, Peter Matheson, Holly 
Hurlburt, and Amber Youell in addition to a forum on early modern women 
and material culture. As usual, the volume includes book reviews and an 
art exhibition review.

We now process payment online in addition to accepting check payment.

Please visit our website: www.emwjournal.umd.edu for subscription forms 
or other information about the journal.

With best wishes,
The Editors

Early Modern Women:
An Interdisciplinary Journal
Center for Renaissance & Baroque Studies
Taliaferro Hall 0139
University of Maryland
College Park, MD 20742-7727 USA tel: 301-405-6830
fax: 301-405-0956

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Four Riddles in Hamlet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0603  Monday, 14 December 2009

From:       Kenneth Chan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Saturday, 12 Dec 2009 04:51:01 +0800
Subject: 20.0587 Four Riddles in Hamlet
Comment:    Re: SHK 20.0587 Four Riddles in Hamlet

ROS: My Lord, you must tell us where the body is, and go with us to the 
King.
HAM: The body is with the King, but the King is not with the body.

In line with both the play's recurring theme of death and the human 
tendency to deny a personal mortality, as well as the fact that 
Rosencrantz is talking about the body of Polonius who has recently died, 
the meaning of Hamlet's statement is likely to be this:

The physical body, which inevitably ages and dies, is certainly with the 
King, but the King refuses to recognize this impermanent nature of his 
body, so his mind is "not with the body." He behaves as though he will 
live forever, ignoring the inevitability of death (even to the extent of 
murdering his own brother for mere materialistic ends).


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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