2009

Position: Assistant Professor in Digital Humanities

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0507  Wednesday, 14 October 2009

From:       Ray Siemens <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Friday, 9 Oct 2009 02:16:41 -0700
Subject:    Position: Assistant Professor in Digital Humanities and 
Renaissance Studies

[please redistribute; apologies for cross-posting]

(Victoria, Canada; 30 Nov 2009 application deadline)

* Digital Humanities and Renaissance Studies

The Department of English at the University of Victoria invites 
applications for an Assistant Professor position in the area of Digital 
Humanities and Renaissance Studies (mailing deadline: 30 November 2009). 
The appointment will be effective 1 July 2010. The successful candidate 
will be expected to take a leading role in the teaching of Digital 
Humanities within the Department at both the undergraduate and graduate 
levels, while also contributing to a strong Renaissance team, the 
largest in the UVic English Department.
* Essential and Desirable Criteria for the Post

Qualifications and Experience:

Essential: A doctoral degree in a relevant area, or evidence that a 
doctoral degree in a relevant area is near to completion; a strong 
research plan.

Desirable: Publications in either or both of the stipulated fields; 
teaching experience in higher education.

Knowledge/Skills/Competences:

Essential: Ability to practice digital humanities techniques to a high 
level; ability to teach undergraduate and graduate courses; ability to 
supervise MA and PhD students; ability to undertake research of an 
international standard; ability to contribute to the administrative 
tasks and committee work of the department; good organizational, 
interpersonal, and communication skills; capacity to work to and meet 
deadlines.

Desirable: Ability to contribute to the Digital Humanities research 
cluster; the ability to support the Internet Shakespeare Editions; the 
ability to support the department's work in Renaissance studies.

* Digital Humanities and Renaissance Studies at UVic

Digital Humanities and Renaissance Studies are two of the strongest 
areas within the Department of English. Digital Humanities is one of the 
nine research clusters within the Department, led by its Canada Research 
Chair, Professor Ray Siemens. Aligned with digital humanists across the 
faculty, UVic has hosted several important Digital Humanities gatherings 
in the past several years, including ACH/ALLC in 2005 and TEI in 2006. 
Its Electronic Textual Cultures Lab, in association with the faculty's 
Humanities Computing and Media Centre, hosts the annual international 
Digital Humanities Summer Institute and events related to its place as a 
node of the Canadian Text Analysis Portal for Research. The 
multi-institutional SSHRC MCRI project Implementing New Knowledge 
Environments has its home in the department (35 researchers across 21 
national and international institutions), as does the Map of Early 
Modern London and the Internet Shakespeare Editions. The department 
currently has nine faculty members in the extended early modern period, 
split between four medievalists (Iain Higgins, Allan Mitchell, John 
Tucker and Adrienne Williams-Boyarin) and five Renaissance specialists 
(Janelle Jenstad, Erin Kelly, Gary Kuchar, Ray Siemens and Richard van 
Oort).

* Application Instructions

Letters of application, curriculum vitae including all university 
transcripts, writing sample, and confidential letters from three 
referees should be sent by 30 November 2009, to

    Dr. Robert Miles, Chair
    Department of English
    University of Victoria
    PO Box 3070 STN CSC
    Victoria, BC V8W 3W1, Canada
    Phone: (250) 721-7236
    Fax: (250) 721-6498
    Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    Website: english.uvic.ca

The University of Victoria is an equity employer and encourages 
applications from women, persons with disabilities, visible minorities, 
Aboriginal Peoples, people of all sexual orientations and genders, and 
others who may contribute to the further diversification of the University.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, in accordance 
with Canadian Immigration requirements, Canadians and permanent 
residents will be given priority.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Wriothesley Anagrams in the Sonnets?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0506  Wednesday, 14 October 2009

From:       Steve Roth <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Wednesday, 7 Oct 2009 13:40:10 -0700
Subject:    Wriothesley Anagrams in the Sonnets?

I would be very interested to hear the opinions of other list members on 
R. H. Winnick's new piece in _Literary Imagination_, on anagrams for 
"Wriothesley" in the sonnets. Oxford has published this article ungated:

http://litimag.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/imp049v1

Winnick makes what strikes me as a very strong case for, and gives many 
examples of, the widespread and quite explicit use and discussion of 
such anagrams by poets in Shakespeare's day (including by S., obviously 
including instances like Twelfth Night's "M.O.A.I."). I don't have the 
breadth of knowledge to evaluate his survey, would love to hear thoughts 
from those who do.

He also acknowledges the slipperiness of such examples -- how easy it is 
to manufacture spurious anagrams, especially given the fast-and-loose 
approach many poets took: fudging with extra, dropped, or repeated 
letters, substituting i for j, f for s, a double U or a U and a V for W, 
and etc. But still, on a first read through his piece, I find it 
reasonably convincing.

This also led me to look at one line from (surprise) Hamlet, an odd 
comment by H. in the mousetrap that I've puzzled over. I notice that the 
"po[e]sie of a ring" yields both "poisoner" and "poison ear" -- if you 
drop a couple of letters.

Profound? Spurious? Curious?

Thoughts?

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

The Book of William by Paul Collins

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0504  Wednesday, 14 October 2009

From:       Alan Horn <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Saturday, 10 Oct 2009 10:57:33 -0400
Subject:    The Book of William by Paul Collins

THE BOOK OF WILLIAM
How Shakespeare's First Folio Conquered the World.
By Paul Collins.
Bloomsbury, $25.
 From NYTimes online

Could you imagine a world without "Macbeth" or "A Midsummer Night's 
Dream"? If the answer is no, direct your thanks to John Heminge and 
Henry Condell, Elizabethan theater producers who assembled a posthumous 
compilation of the work of their friend and peer William Shakespeare 
after he died in 1616. Without their foresight, Shakespeare might have 
been remembered as "just another industrious quill-scratcher," Collins 
writes in this lively and entertaining history of one of the most 
important books in English literature. Part antiquarian-book primer, 
part chronicle of literary curiosities, "The Book of William" is divided 
into five acts, each evoking a significant place and time in the First 
Folio's colorful history. Collins's diverse cast of characters includes 
an overconfident Alexander Pope, editor of a hack job of a 1725 
Shakespeare collection intended to supplant the Folio in reputation; 
Henry Clay Folger, the oil baron behind the world's largest collection 
of First Folios, which now resides at the Folger Shakespeare Library in 
Washington; and Mitsuo Nitta of Tokyo, First Folio dealer par 
excellence. Weaved throughout are accounts of Collins's amusing efforts 
to examine a handful of the 230 First Folios known to exist; he writes 
of the mixture of horror and delight he felt on discovering that "some 
Jacobean brat" had doodled in a Folio's margins. By the end, the reader 
is inclined to agree with Collins's assertion that "books bear a 
tangible presence alongside their ineffable quality of thought: they 
have a body and a soul."


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Textual Evidence Regarding Shakespeare's Fair Friend

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0505  Wednesday, 14 October 2009

From:       Roy Winnick <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Monday, 5 Oct 2009 07:49:03 -0400
Subject:    Textual Evidence Regarding Shakespeare's Fair Friend

I'm pleased to send you, a news release from Oxford Journals announcing 
the publication of my essay, "'Loe, here in one line is his name twice 
writ': Anagrams, Shakespeare's Sonnets, and the Identity of the Fair 
Friend," in the Fall 2009 issue of the journal Literary Imagination.

As the release indicates, the paper presents new textual evidence that 
may solve one of the enduring mysteries of English literature: the 
identity of the young man for or about whom William Shakespeare wrote 
some of the world's most familiar and best-loved poems-gathered together 
in Shakespeare's Sonnets, a volume published exactly four hundred years 
ago this year.

Also attached below is a pdf file containing the paper itself, which has 
just been posted on the Literary Imagination website (by special 
arrangement, without password protection, hence accessible by 
subscribers and non-subscribers alike) and which will be published in 
hard-copy format in November.

I would be happy to discuss the essay with you or with one of your 
colleagues, at your/their convenience. Please feel free to contact me by 
return email and I'd be delighted to give you or them a call.

Roy Winnick
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

New textual evidence may solve mystery of Shakespeare's "Fair Friend"

BOSTON, MASS., October 5, 2009-A new study of Shakespeare's Sonnets may 
solve one of the enduring mysteries of English literature: the identity 
of the young man for or about whom Shakespeare wrote some of the world's 
most familiar and best-loved poems.

It has long been widely believed that the "Fair Friend" of the 
Sonnets-first published four centuries ago, in 1609, in a quarto volume 
today commonly known as Q-was Henry Wriothesley, the third Earl of 
Southampton, to whom Shakespeare dedicated his first two published 
works, the narrative poems Venus and Adonis (1593) and Lucrece (1594).

Until now, however, the evidence pointing to Wriothesley as Q's Fair 
Friend has been inconclusive-largely consisting, along with the 
dedications, of parallels between known facts of Wriothesley's life and 
implied facts of the Fair Friend's, including the father's death in his 
son's youth, a strikingly androgynous beauty, an early refusal to marry, 
and a later period of imprisonment.

The new study, written by critic and biographer R. H. Winnick (1) and 
just published in the Fall 2009 issue of Literary Imagination (2), 
provides newly discovered textual evidence that Wriothesley was, in 
fact, the Fair Friend.

Winnick argues that, in addition to the anagrammatic wordplay noted in 
recent years by other scholars, more than a dozen lines in Shakespeare's 
Sonnets contain previously unremarked instances in which short, 
semantically discrete phrases "spell" Wriothesley's name, and do so in 
ways that suggest authorial intent.

One example occurs in sonnet 17, which promises that by fathering a son 
the Friend (in Q's spelling) "should liue twise in it, and in my rime." 
"Two of the sonnet's lines," Winnick says, "uniquely in Q and 
unduplicated in a control group of nearly four hundred other sonnets, 
each contain all twenty-two letters needed to form the name 
Wriothesley-twise." One of the two lines reads: "Which hides your life, 
and shewes not halfe your parts."

Another example is the four-word, fourteen-character phrase "Be where 
you list" in sonnet 58, a phrase that, Winnick says, "contains all the 
letters needed to form Be U Wriothesley without a single letter left 
over; and, as such, seems wittily to demonstrate that Shakespeare may 
(as the poem puts it) 'in thought controule' the Fair Friend even as his 
poet-persona, in the same poem-and phrase-abjectly bemoans the Friend's 
uncontrollability."

Notes to editors

(1) "'Loe, here in one line is his name twice writ': Anagrams, 
Shakespeare's Sonnets, and the Identity of the Fair Friend". The full 
text of Winnick's study can be electronically accessed by going to 
http://litimag.oxfordjournals.org and clicking "Advance Access."

Winnick (who may be reached directly at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) received 
his Ph.D. in English from Princeton University in 1976 and was a 
Guggenheim Fellow in 1979. On behalf of the late Lawrance Thompson, he 
co-authored the third, final volume of Thompson's "official" biography 
of the American poet Robert Frost, published by Holt, Rinehart & Winston 
in 1977. Winnick's edition of the letters of the American 
poet-playwright Archibald MacLeish was published by Houghton Mifflin in 
1983, and he has since published critical studies on Chaucer, 
Shakespeare and Melville in, respectively, The Chaucer Review, Notes and 
Queries, and Nineteenth-Century Literature. An independent scholar, 
Winnick lives in Princeton, New Jersey.

(2) Literary Imagination-published three times a year by Oxford 
Journals, a Division of Oxford University Press, on behalf of the 
Association of Literary Scholars and Critics-is a forum for those 
interested in the distinctive nature, uses, and pleasures of literature, 
from ancient to modern, in all languages.

Founded in 1994 and based in Boston, Mass., the Association of Literary 
Scholars and Critics promotes excellence in literary criticism and 
scholarship, and works to ensure that literature thrives in both 
scholarly and creative environments. The Association encourages the 
reading and writing of literature, criticism, and scholarship, as well 
as wide-ranging discussions among those committed to the reading and 
study of literary works.

For more information, please contact:
Rebecca Wray
Oxford Journals
+44 (0) 1865 354924 (from the US, 011-44-1865-354924)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare in Culture

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0503  Wednesday, 14 October 2009

From:       B Lei <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Sunday, 4 Oct 2009 12:44:32 +0800
Subject:    Shakespeare in Culture: 4th Conference of the NTU 
Shakespeare Forum

Please forward this e-mail to interested colleagues, students, and friends.

Apologies for cross-postings.

Shakespeare in Culture

http://www.ntu.edu.tw/chinese2009/about/Emblem72.gif

The Fourth Conference of the NTU Shakespeare Forum
National Taiwan University, Taipei
November 26-28, 2009

Organizer:
NTU Shakespeare Forum

Partners:
Chinese-Taipei Theatre Association
NTU Center for the Arts
NTU Library

Sponsors:
National Science Council
Ministry of Education
NTU Aiming for Top University Project
College of Liberal Arts, NTU
Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, NTU
Department of Drama and Theatre, NTU

Overview:
"Shakespeare in Culture," the fourth conference of the NTU Shakespeare 
Forum, is a high-profile, international event, with speakers coming from 
China, Hong Kong, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Korea, Macao, Malaysia, 
the Philippines, Singapore, the United Kingdom, and the United States. 
An arena for interdisciplinary approaches to Shakespeare, the conference 
hosts not only scholarly presentations but also two performances, a 
computer workshop, a teaching workshop, and a book exhibit.

Keynote Speeches:

* Richard Burt (University of Florida), "Missing Shakespeare's Corpus: 
Spectral Media, Mourning, and the Incomplete Works of Culture"

* Dennis Kennedy (Trinity College Dublin), "Shakespeare, Asia and the 
Intercultural"

* Ching-Hsi Perng (National Taiwan University), "Growing Young: Bonding 
the Bard and Bangzi Opera"

* Ann Thompson (King's College London), "Hamlet and the market in 
cultural commodities"

Performances:

Bond
A Bangzi opera adaptation of The Merchant of Venice by the Taiwan Bangzi 
Company
(starring Hailing Wang, Hai-shan Chu, Yang-ling Hsiao, and Chien-Hua 
Liu; translated by Ching-Hsi Perng, written by Ching-Hsi Perng and Fang 
Chen, and directed by Po-Shen Lu), with a post-performance discussion 
session

Shakespeare in Song
Vocal recital by Chia-yi Lee (Taipei National University of the Arts)

Computer Workshop:

Resolving Authorship Disputes with Information Technology
Albert C. C. Yang (Taipei Veterans General Hospital)

Bring a text (5000 words minimum, in plain text format) of concern to 
the workshop and test on site to find out if it is authentically 
Shakespearean!

Teaching Workshop (Maximum: 20, registration required):

How to Incorporate Acting into a College-Level Shakespeare Class
Joseph Graves (Peking University)
Linda Alpers (Oregon Shakespeare Festival)

Book Exhibit:
A book exhibit of titles by international presenters and local scholars 
will be set up at the conference site.

Registration:
Admission is free, but registration by November 1 is required for
(1) a hardcopy of the conference proceedings,
(2) participation of the workshops,
(3) a ticket to the preview of Bond,
(4) a ticket to Shakespeare in Song, and
(5) meal services.

Please complete the attached registration form and return it to 
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Updates can be found at www.Shakespeare.tw.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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