2009

Kunz-Shakespeare-and-Precious-Stones/page_065

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0496  Monday, 28 September 2009

From:       Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Friday, 25 Sep 2009 05:50:52 -0400
Subject:    Kunz-Shakespeare-and-Precious-Stones/page_065

This is one of the free e-books available for download.

I have a non-Shakespeare question about one of the passages. If anyone 
has the answer, I would love it if you would email me directly.

Here's the passage:

"Thierry Badouer, a German goldsmith-jeweller, received from the French 
court, in 1572, an order for 250,000 crowns' worth of jewels to be 
distributed as gifts at the approaching marriage of Henri de Navarre 
with Marguerite de Valois. He faithfully executed his part of the task 
and brought the jewels with him to Paris, but before he had been able to 
deliver them to the Royal Treasury they were stolen from him during the 
confusion of the St. Bartholomew Massacre. Eventually, in the reign of 
Henri IV, his widow was partly reimbursed for the loss, receiving 
one-quarter of the amount of her claim."

Here's my question: The Massacre began Six Days after the wedding. Was 
it the custom for such gifts to be distributed that late?

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
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editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Hamlet: The Undiscovered Country

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0495  Thursday, 24 September 2009

From:       Steve Roth <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Wednesday, 23 Sep 2009 09:26:47 -0700
Subject:    Hamlet: The Undiscovered Country

To all those list members who have queried me over the years about this, 
my book is finally available in print. Amazon and Amazon.co.uk seem to 
be the cheapest sources if you want to buy it, or you can find out more 
at http://princehamlet.com -- including the Preface and Chapter One in 
toto, a large collection of admittedly idiosyncratic documents, sources, 
and links, and -- many thanks -- some very kind words from various list 
members.

If you're among those to whom I've promised copies and you haven't 
received one, please don't hesitate to drop me a line. I'd love to get 
the book out there among this community, in hopes that you'll spread the 
word to other interested types. So don't be shy.

Thanks,
Steve

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Book Announcement: Literature and the Brain

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0493  Monday, 21 September 2009

From:       Norman Holland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Monday, 21 Sep 2009 09:54:54 -0400
Subject:    Book Announcement: Literature and the Brain

Friends and Colleagues,

This book has a lot in it about drama and many Shakespearean examples: 
the role of dramatic form, the brain mechanisms of poetic language, 
emotional response to, say, Hamlet or Shylock, perceiving them as real 
people, and much more. I hope you will find it of enough interest not 
only to buy it yourself, but to pass this message on to other lists to 
which you belong.

With warm regards,
Norm

Norm Holland
Marston-Milbauer Eminent Scholar Emeritus
University of Florida

This book goes straight to the basic human questions about literature 
when it explains how our brains convert the imaginary events of stories, 
poems, plays, and films into real pleasure. Our brains can do this, 
because we know in our frontal lobes that we cannot act to change the 
literary work. This is only one of the special ways our brains react as 
we go from the creation of literature to being transported, to "poetic 
faith," to enjoyment, to meaning, and finally to evaluation. Each of 
these parts of the literary process draws on brain processes in an 
unusual way. Literature and the Brain describes and explains these brain 
changes, giving us a new understanding of what we do when we do 
literature and why we do it.

http://www.literatureandthebrain.com/

Hardcover $44.95    Support independent publishing: buy this book.
Paperback $24.95    Support independent publishing: buy this book.
Download  $9.95     Support independent publishing: buy this book.

All profits from this book will go to support the PsyArt Foundation and 
the psychological study of the arts.


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

All-Female Measure for Measure

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0494  Monday, 21 September 2009

From:       Eric Johnson-DeBaufre <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Monday, 21 Sep 2009 10:05:34 -0400
Subject:    All-Female Measure for Measure

Dear fellow Shakespeareans,

For those of you who will be in or near Washington, D.C., until October 
10th, I highly recommend taking the time to see the Taffety Punk Theatre 
Company's all-female staging of _Measure for Measure_. The decision to 
assign all the roles to women makes for a very layered experience of the 
play and activates interpretive possibilities that, in my experience, 
can be altogether absent, compromised, or less-convincing when performed 
by men. Although the idea of all-female Shakespeare might strike some as 
a gimmick, the performance, under the fine direction of Lise Bruneau (a 
RADA graduate), shows it to be an inspired idea. This was a genuinely 
provocative performance of Shakespeare, one that made me want to revisit 
and reread the play in light of the issues raised by the performance.

A description of the company, its mission, and biographies of its 
members can be found here. http://www.taffetypunk.com/shows.html

The performance runs until October 10th and tickets can be purchased 
either in advance or for $10.00 at the door.

Eric Johnson-DeBaufre


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

CFP: MRDS at LEEDS

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0492  Monday, 21 September 2009

From:       Suzanne Westfall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Saturday, 19 Sep 2009 12:47:37 -0400
Subject:    Call for Papers: MRDS at LEEDS

Last call for submissions to the MRDS session at the International 
Congress for Medieval Studies, Leeds, 12-15 July 2010.

Beastly Drama: Animals in Early Modern Theatre

2009, which marks the sesquicentennial of Charles Darwin's Origin of 
Species, has set off a flurry of investigations into evolution and 
animal studies in various disciplines. How do we define ourselves in 
relationship to the animal/human binary, and has that definition changed 
since the early modern period? This session will consider how we might 
interpret the interactions of animals and humans in theatre from the 
14th to 17th centuries. Possible topics include: staging with animals in 
theatres (from bear-baitings to the sheep in /The Second Shepherd's 
Play/ to Crab in /Two Gentlemen/); animals as symbolic "others" (from 
"the beast with two backs" to Ferdinand's lycanthropia); 
representations/constructions of animals in entertainments; 
anthropomorphization and hierarchical ideologies.

If you have previously sent an abstract, please re-send (computer 
crashes have temporarily wiped my laptop. Ah, technology!).

Please send abstracts and title to:

Suzanne Westfall
Department of English/Theatre
Lafayette College
Easton PA 18042  USA.


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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