2009

NEH Summer Institute

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0476  Friday, 4 September 2009

From:       Irven Resnick <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Thursday, 3 Sep 2009 16:03:10 -0400
Subject:    NEH Summer Institute

Applications are encouraged for a summer 2010 National Endowment for the 
Humanities (NEH) summer institute for 25 college and university faculty, 
"Representations of the 'Other': Jews in Medieval Christendom." The 
institute, directed by Professor Irven M. Resnick, will meet at the 
Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies (England) from 6 July-11 
August, 2010. A stipend of $3800 is provided to all participants. For 
complete details and application information, please see www.utc.edu/neh 
or contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

  _______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Experimental Allegorical Dramaturgy

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0475  Friday, 4 September 2009

From:       John Hudson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Friday, 04 Sep 2009 10:30:41 -0400
Subject:    Experimental Allegorical Dramaturgy

NEW YORK. Six experimental performances of  the Virgin Mary allegories 
in the characters of Ophelia, Desdemona and Juliet, open with two free 
productions at 3pm at ManhattanTheaterSource 177 MacDougal Street, on 5 
and 12 September. This is followed by paid performances of Shakespeare's 
Three Marys at Where Eagles Dare Studios 347, W36th Street, on September 
16th (9pm), 20th (2pm and 4pm) and 30h (9pm). Tickets available at 
SmartTix.com. Director Jenny Greeman interweaves  passages from the York 
mystery plays with passages from Shakespeare to provide new context for 
seeing these passages on-stage. The section from Hamlet draws on work by 
Brunn, Hoff, Hassel , Newman, and Hunt, the other sections draw upon 
articles by Steve Sohmer.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

The Ending of the Winter's Tale

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0473  Tuesday, 1 September 2009

[1] From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Monday, 31 Aug 2009 17:44:20 -0400
     Subj:   Re: SHK 20.0469 The Ending of the Winter's Tale

[2] From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Monday, 31 Aug 2009 17:50:23 -0400
     Subj:   Re: SHK 20.0469 The Ending of the Winter's Tale

[3] From:   William Babula <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Monday, 31 Aug 2009 15:51:06 -0700
     Subj:   Re: SHK 20.0469 The Ending of the Winter's Tale


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Monday, 31 Aug 2009 17:44:20 -0400
Subject: 20.0469 The Ending of the Winter's Tale
Comment:    Re: SHK 20.0469 The Ending of the Winter's Tale

"within a few minutes, Perdita returns -- but Antigonus doesn't."

Unless, of course, the actor who played Antigonus doubled as Camillo, 
which I think is highly probable. Then, in a metatheatrical sense, 
Paulina does get her husband back.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Monday, 31 Aug 2009 17:50:23 -0400
Subject: 20.0469 The Ending of the Winter's Tale
Comment:    Re: SHK 20.0469 The Ending of the Winter's Tale

Alan Dessen asks:

 >One question has not emerged in this discussion: to whom does
 >Paulina address "It is requir'd / You do awake your faith"?  To
 >Leontes alone? To all onstage? To the playgoer (or reader or
 >critic of the last twenty years)?

Perhaps Alan is thinking about the brilliant production by the RSC a 
couple of years ago, which he and I both saw when the company was in 
residence at Davidson College. Paulina addressed the comment to the 
audience, a large portion of which was on stage (it was a "promenade" 
performance). It worked beautifully; a true Tinkerbelle moment.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       William Babula <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Monday, 31 Aug 2009 15:51:06 -0700
Subject: 20.0469 The Ending of the Winter's Tale
Comment:    Re: SHK 20.0469 The Ending of the Winter's Tale

In my article, "'Nature's Bastards' and Painted Maids: Artifice in 
Shakespeare's Romances" Journal of the Wooden O Symposium. Vol. 2., 
2002, 1-8, I discuss Perdita's debate with Polixenes concerning the role 
of art and nature in reference to gillyflowers or multicolored 
carnations, believed to be the result of artificial cross-breeding with 
other flowers. I argue that Shakespeare in the Romances has essentially 
taken the potential tragic plots and married them (cross-breeding) 
through art to an alternative yet consciously artificial vision of 
providential order and mercy to create the noble cultivated flower: the 
Romance genre which accommodates a "Wishes fall out as they are willed" 
(Pericles) ending like that of _The Winter's Tale_.

William Babula


_______________________________________________________________
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Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare Colloquium at Fairleigh Dickinson

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0474  Friday, 4 September 2009

From:       Harry Keyishian <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Thursday, 3 Sep 2009 12:03:08 -0400
Subject:    Annual Shakespeare Colloquium at Fairleigh Dickinson 
University 24 October

"Colloquium on Shakespeare and Philosophy at Fairleigh Dickinson 
University, Saturday, October 24 2009"

Shakespeare and Philosophy is the topic of the 17th annual Shakespeare 
Colloquium to be held at the Madison, NJ campus of Fairleigh Dickinson 
University on Saturday, October 24, 2009. Topics will include the ways 
material objects empower new ways of thinking in Shakespeare, the 
importance of the art of lying in Shakespeare, whether and why we are 
moved by Shakespearean tragedy, and how German philosophers made a 
masterpiece of _Hamlet_.

Speakers will be Hugh Grady (Arcadia College), Eric Johnson-Debaufre, 
Paul Kottman (The New School), and Andrew Majeske (John Jay College). 
The Colloquium will take place from 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. in Room S-11 
(Sturchio Hall), Science Building. The program is free of charge and 
open to the public. . Room S-11 is handicapped-accessible and physical 
assistance will be provided for those who require it.

New Jersey teachers may receive Professional Development credit by 
attending. For further information, call 973-443-8711 or contact 
Colloquium Coordinator Harry Keyishian at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or at 
the Department of Literature, Languages, Writing, and Philosophy 
M-MS3-01, Fairleigh Dickinson University, Madison NJ 07940.

The program begins at 9:30 with  Eric Johnson-Debaufre's presentation 
"That Obscure Desire of Objects: Subject and Object in _Hamlet_." Dr. 
Johnson-Debaufre will discuss the powerful role played by Yorick's skull 
in shaping Hamlet's changing cognition about death and subjectivity, and 
the ways material objects and physical contact with them actually enable 
new and/or previously unavailable forms of thinking in Shakespeare. Eric 
Johnson-DeBaufre holds a Ph.D. from Boston University. He has written 
for the online journal _CounterPunch_ and for _Medieval and Renaissance 
Drama in England_, and has taught at Luther College and Fairleigh 
Dickinson University.

At 10:45 Professor Andrew Majeske will discuss "Literature, Law, and the 
Art of Lying" in relation to _Measure for Measure_ and _As You Like It_, 
where the playwright deals directly with the education of future rulers 
in the art of deception-both committing it, and learning to see through 
it. Andrew Majeske is an Associate Professor of English at John Jay 
College of Criminal Justice (CUNY) where he teaches Literature and Law, 
Shakespeare, and Medieval & Renaissance Literature in the English 
Department. In addition to his PhD in literature, with an emphasis in 
Classics, from UC Davis, Professor Majeske has a JD from Loyola 
University of Chicago School of Law. Before returning to the academy, he 
practiced law for 11 years. He is the author of _Equity in English 
Renaissance Literature_ (2006) and editor of _Justice, Women, and Power 
in English Renaissance Drama_ (2009).

Lunch will be available at the campus dining hall from 12:00 to1:00 p.m.

At 1:00 Professor Paul A. Kottman, discussing "Tragic Conditions in 
Shakespeare," will ask whether we are still moved by Shakespeare, and if 
so, why? And how?  If our typical responses to tragic events -- grief, 
or fear and pity -- shed light on the collective stakes of those events, 
then what do Shakespeare's tragedies say about what we mean to one 
another?  In what ways might Shakespeare force us to move beyond the 
classical (Aristotelian, Sophoclean) ways of thinking about tragedy and 
social life?  Paul A. Kottman is Assistant Professor of Comparative 
Literature at the New School, where he teaches at Eugene Lang College, 
the New School for Liberal Arts, and in Liberal Studies at the New 
School for Social Research. He is the author of _Tragic Conditions in 
Shakespeare_ (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009) and _A Politics of 
the Scene_ (Stanford University Press, 2008) and the editor of 
_Philosophers on Shakespeare_ (Stanford University Press, 2009). He has 
also translated two books by the Italian philosopher Adriana Cavarero, 
_Relating Narratives_ (Routledge, 2000) and _For More Than One Voice_ 
(Stanford University Press, 2005). He is currently working on a book 
project, tentatively entitled "On Love and the Social." The recipient of 
a Solmsen post-doctoral fellowship and a grant from the Mellon 
foundation, his writing has appeared in _The Oxford Literary Review_, 
_Shakespeare Studies_, _Theatre Journal_, _The Journal of Cultural and 
Religious Studies_ and the _Revue Internationale de Philosophie_.

In the final presentation, starting at 2:15, Professor Hugh Grady speaks 
on "Aesthetics and Subjectivity in _Hamlet_: From Classical Aesthetics 
to Postmodernism." Professor Grady will note how late eighteenth- and 
early nineteenth-century Germany discourse on Shakespeare's _Hamlet_ was 
complexly interconnected with the great literary and philosophical 
revolutions that produced German Idealist philosophy and German 
Romanticism -- and much of the content of aesthetic theory. These 
changes resulted in _Hamlet_'s rise to world stature, transforming it 
from the great if flawed masterpiece of the English national poet to 
perhaps the greatest masterpiece of world literature. Hugh Grady is 
Professor of English at Arcadia University. He has published extensively 
in the field of Shakespeare studies, with some 35 journal and anthology 
articles, four monographs, and two critical anthologies. His newest 
book, _Shakespeare and Impure Aesthetics_, has just been published by 
Cambridge University Press. His previous books include _Shakespeare, 
Machiavelli, and Montaigne: Power and Subjectivity from Richard II to 
Hamlet_ (2002), _Shakespeare's Universal Wolf: Studies in Early Modern 
Reification_ (1996), and _The Modernist Shakespeare: Critical Texts in a 
Material World_ (1991). He has edited and contributed to the critical 
anthologies _Presentist Shakespeares_ (2006, co-edited with Terence 
Hawkes) and _Shakespeare and Modernity: Early Modern to Millennium_ (2000).

These colloquia are made possible by grants from the Columbia University 
Seminar on Shakespeare and by voluntary donations.
_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Frame Story for _Taming of the Shrew_?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0472  Tuesday, 1 September 2009

[1] From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Monday, 31 Aug 2009 18:03:28 -0400
     Subj:   Re: SHK 20.0468 Frame Story for _Taming of the Shrew_?

[2] From:   John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Tuesday, 1 Sep 2009 3:28:45 +0100
     Subj:   Re: SHK 20.0458 Frame Story for _Taming of the Shrew_?


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Monday, 31 Aug 2009 18:03:28 -0400
Subject: 20.0468 Frame Story for _Taming of the Shrew_?
Comment:    Re: SHK 20.0468 Frame Story for _Taming of the Shrew_?

The Sly frame continues in The Taming of A Shrew text, at the end of 
which Sly returns as a tinker and has a conversation with the tapster. 
He tells the tapster that he has had a rare dream in which he learnt how 
to tame a shrew, a lesson he will go home and apply to his wife. The 
audience's contemplation of what Sly had in store if he did that would 
have probably induced uproarious laughter.

That little scene ties things up very neatly; it makes the point better 
than anything else could that the main action of the piece -- the play 
within the play -- is a pure farce, not to be taken seriously.

Even the partial frame which we have in F1 makes this point. For 
example, in I.ii.18, when Grumio, being cuffed soundly by Petruchio, 
says "Help, Mistress, help, my master is mad." There are no female 
characters on the main stage, so whom is Grumio addressing?  It seems to 
me that he is penetrating the fourth wall by pleading with the page 
dressed like Sly's lady and, thus, emphasizing the farcical character of 
the main action. Unfortunately, since Theobald this likely reading has 
been lost as a result of his too hasty emendation of "mistris" to "masters."

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 1 Sep 2009 3:28:45 +0100
Subject: 20.0458 Frame Story for _Taming of the Shrew_?
Comment:    Re: SHK 20.0458 Frame Story for _Taming of the Shrew_?

Conrad Cook wrote:

 >What are the critically most-accepted theories concerning the inclusion
 >of the "induction" in _Shrew_?

You know, we would have had a clearer idea of that if Barbara Hodgdon's 
Arden 3 edition had ever been published. The last publication date was 
given as 15 September 2005, and Amazon.co.uk still has that -- complete 
with an image of the cover design. What actually happened seems a bit 
mysterious -- it seems awfully premature to produce a cover design for a 
book which hasn't been written -- and the suspicion must be that it was 
a victim of the blood-letting under the previous owners of Arden.

John Briggs

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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