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Home :: Archive :: 2009 :: August ::
The Ending of the Winter's Tale
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0463  Friday, 28 August 2009

[1] From:   Lynn Brenner <
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     Date:   Thursday, 27 Aug 2009 17:29:02 EDT
     Subj:   Re: SHK 20.0462 The Ending of the Winter's Tale

[2] From:   David Lindley <
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     Date:   Friday, 28 Aug 2009 11:11:02 +0100
     Subj:   RE: SHK 20.0462 The Ending of the Winter's Tale


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Lynn Brenner <
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Date:       Thursday, 27 Aug 2009 17:29:02 EDT
Subject: 20.0462 The Ending of the Winter's Tale
Comment:    Re: SHK 20.0462 The Ending of the Winter's Tale

One additional thought:

The last scene of Winter's Tale is so powerfully moving partly because 
we all desire forgiveness and redemption. But it's more than that.

We want to discover that death isn't final after all.

In fact, the finality of death is what's terribly hard to believe.

Isn't it easier to believe is the miraculous restoration of life -- the 
last-minute reversal, the deliverance, the messenger who says, 'wait, it 
was all a mistake, a bad dream'?

'O, she's warm!'

What more universal longing is there?

Lynn Brenner

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       David Lindley <
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Date:       Friday, 28 Aug 2009 11:11:02 +0100
Subject: 20.0462 The Ending of the Winter's Tale
Comment:    RE: SHK 20.0462 The Ending of the Winter's Tale

One really interesting question about Foreman, of course, is whether or 
not he saw the same play that has come down to us in the Folio text, or 
whether that text itself represents a later version. I think myself that 
it's pretty clear that elements in the pastoral scenes were added later, 
even if not much later, but whether one could possibly extend that to 
the final scene I have never speculated (though others have). I suppose 
it is not totally inconceivable that a first version of the play 
finished with a dramatisation of the return of Perdita, rather than the 
reports we now have, whether or not it then went on to the denouement of 
Pandosto?

But yes, of course one should be interested in what Foreman says he saw. 
Just as one finds, in comparing modern reviews of productions, that no 
two people see quite the same things, or think the same things worth 
commenting on, the same must have been true in 1611.

David Lindley

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