2009

Major new Renaissance Drama DVD Releases

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0304  Wednesday, 10 June 2009

[1] From:   Judy Prince <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Tuesday, 9 Jun 2009 15:41:41 -0400
     Subj:   SHK 20.0294 Major new Renaissance Drama DVD Releases

[2] From:   Anthony Martin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Wednesday, 10 Jun 2009 07:24:28 +0900
     Subj:   Re: SHK 20.0294 Major new Renaissance Drama DVD Releases

[3] From:   Alfredo Michel Modenessi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Tuesday, 9 Jun 2009 17:59:32 -0500
     Subj:   Re: SHK 20.0294 Major new Renaissance Drama DVD Releases

[4] From:   John Chapot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Tuesday, 9 Jun 2009 18:19:51 -0700
     Subj:   Re: Brook Lear

[5] From:   Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Wednesday, June 10, 2009
     Subj:   Re: SHK 20.0294 Major new Renaissance Drama DVD Releases


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Judy Prince <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 9 Jun 2009 15:41:41 -0400
Subject: Major new Renaissance Drama DVD Releases
Comment:    SHK 20.0294 Major new Renaissance Drama DVD Releases

Adding to Hannibal Hamlin's list of DVDs, I'd recommend the best-filmed 
A Midsummer Night's Dream I've seen. Released in 2005, it's a 1968 Peter 
Hall-directed production with Judi Dench, Helen Mirren, Donald Eccles, 
and Ian Holm. You can rent it from Netflix, or for $16.58, you can have 
a new copy of it from amazon.com. Once on the website, click on 
"customers' reviews" for reasons why this production and these 
performances outshine all the others:

http://www.amazon.com/Midsummer-Nights-Dream-Judi-Dench/dp/B0007CNXV4/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=dvd&qid=1244574635&sr=1-3

Best,
Judy Prince

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Anthony Martin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Wednesday, 10 Jun 2009 07:24:28 +0900
Subject: 20.0294 Major new Renaissance Drama DVD Releases
Comment:    Re: SHK 20.0294 Major new Renaissance Drama DVD Releases

As I'm sure lots of people will observe, the Peter Brook King Lear is 
available in British format (ie region 2, PAL). And you can get Chimes 
at Midnight as an import DVD also.

Anthony Martin

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Alfredo Michel Modenessi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 9 Jun 2009 17:59:32 -0500
Subject: 20.0294 Major new Renaissance Drama DVD Releases
Comment:    Re: SHK 20.0294 Major new Renaissance Drama DVD Releases

Hannibal Hamlin wrote: "Now if only someone can put Chimes of Midnight 
or Peter Brook's King Lear on DVD (I'm not holding my breath)."

Nor should you. BOTH are available on DVD. _Chimes_ from "Suevia Films", 
Spain: regions 1-6; Brook's _Lear_ from Columbia Tristar Pictures-UK: 
region 2. Try a European web-shop.

Best,
Alfredo Michel Modenessi

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       John Chapot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 9 Jun 2009 18:19:51 -0700
Subject:    Re: Brook Lear

Learmedia in Canada has the Brook/Scofield Lear on a US-playable  DVD. 
Here's the link:

http://www.learmedia.ca/product_info.php/ products_id/30

This web merchandiser has a great catalog.

John Chapot

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Wednesday, June 10, 2009
Subject: 20.0294 Major new Renaissance Drama DVD Releases
Comment:    Re: SHK 20.0294 Major new Renaissance Drama DVD Releases

What amazingly helpful people subscribe to this list. I have a copy of 
the British release of the Brook Lear with Paul Scofield that Anthony 
Martin mentioned; and although I have a extra DVD player that plays DVDs 
from all regions, I jumped at buying a copy of the Region 1 version of 
the Brook Lear from Canada's Learmedia mentioned by John Chapot. At 
Learmedia, I also found a DVD copy of the Merchant of Venice with 
Olivier playing Shylock as a Rothschild (I was eager to get a DVD 
version, since my attempts at transferring my VHS copy to DVD were not 
as successful as I would have liked). I also noted that Learmedia has 
the Spanish "Suevia Films" version of Chimes at Midnight mentioned by 
Alfredo Michel Modenessi. I have a copy of Chimes in its alternate title 
Falstaff from a Brazilian distributor (the notes on the packaging are in 
Portuguese); however, when I went to the web site 
www.dvdcontinental.com.br I was not able to find Falstaff among the 
current titles. I brought my copy from someone who specializes in 
getting obscure titles. From the same person, I believe I bought my copy 
of Welles's Macbeth with Korean as the default language.

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Iago

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0303  Wednesday, 10 June 2009

[1] From:   Harry Rusche <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Tuesday, 9 Jun 2009 15:04:16 -0400
     Subj:   Re: SHK 20.0291 Iago

[2] From:   Cary Mazer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Tuesday, 09 Jun 2009 15:12:39 -0400
     Subj:   Re: SHK 20.0291 Iago

[3] From:   Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Wednesday, June 10, 2009
     Subj:   Re: SHK 20.0291 Iago

[4] From:   Evelyn Gajowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Tuesday, 9 Jun 2009 12:16:35 -0700
     Subj:   RE: SHK 20.0291 Iago

[5] From:   David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Wednesday, 10 Jun 2009 17:00:56 +0100
     Subj:   RE: SHK 20.0291 Iago


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Harry Rusche <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 9 Jun 2009 15:04:16 -0400
Subject: 20.0291 Iago
Comment:    Re: SHK 20.0291 Iago

Patrick Stewart did a production of "Othello" where he played Othello 
and everyone else was played by a black. One critic called it a kind of 
"reverse negative."

Harry Rusche

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Cary Mazer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 09 Jun 2009 15:12:39 -0400
Subject: 20.0291 Iago
Comment:    Re: SHK 20.0291 Iago

1985, Folger Shakespeare. There's an essay about it in Ayanna Thompson's 
Colorblind Shakespeare.

Cary

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Wednesday, June 10, 2009
Subject: 20.0291 Iago
Comment:    Re: SHK 20.0291 Iago

If my memory does not fail me, I saw both the productions referred to by 
Harry Rusche and Cary Mazer above. If I am not mistaken, Iago was played 
by Andre Braugher to Avery Brooks's Othello with Franchelle Stewart Dorn 
as Emilia. As I recall, Braugher played Iago as being motivated by 
revenge against Othello for falling for a white woman and thus rejecting 
his blackness. The "photo negative" casting in the Othello with Patrick 
Stewart was particularly interesting to me for its providing another 
perspective by which to view the inherent racism of the play. I recall 
vividly Craig Wallace's Duke delivering the line "I think this tale 
would win my daughter, too." with a venom and bitterness that I have 
never heard from a white actor's delivering the line. Before this 
production, I wanted to read the Duke's remark as an example of a white 
man's being relatively free from the racism of the play, but Craig 
Wallace opened my eyes to another, just as valid, reading. Also, of 
interest to me was that Fran Dorn played Emilia in both productions 
completely differently. In the 1985 production, her Emilia was a strong, 
willful woman, who was not to be messed with, reminiscent of her 
Paulina, while her Emilia for the reverse negative Othello was a woman 
who had been so abused by her husband that she would do anything to get 
relief from her husband's incessant violence and abuse toward her, even 
to the point of stealing her mistress's handkerchief.

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Evelyn Gajowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 9 Jun 2009 12:16:35 -0700
Subject: 20.0291 Iago
Comment:    RE: SHK 20.0291 Iago

For Louis Swilley,

At the Washington, DC, production of a few years back starring Patrick 
Stewart as Othello, the rest of the entire cast was black.

All the best,
Evelyn Gajowski
Professor of English
Department of English
University of Nevada

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Wednesday, 10 Jun 2009 17:00:56 +0100
Subject: 20.0291 Iago
Comment:    RE: SHK 20.0291 Iago

Didn't Patrick Stewart play a white Othello in a colour-reversed 
production by Jude Kelly?

David Lindley


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Shakespeare/"Star Trek"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0301  Wednesday, 10 June 2009

From:       Stefanie Peters <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 9 Jun 2009 20:14:05 +0100
Subject: 20.0276 Shakespeare/"Star Trek"
Comment:    Re: SHK 20.0276 Shakespeare/"Star Trek"

For those curious, the BardFilm blog claims to have found EVERY 
Shakespeare reference in Star Trek:

http://bardfilm.blogspot.com/2009/06/shakespeare-and-star-trek-complete.html

Stefanie

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The Hounds of Theseus

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0302  Wednesday, 10 June 2009

[1] From:   Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Tuesday, 9 Jun 2009 19:59:07 +0100
     Subj:   Re: SHK 20.0290 The Hounds of Theseus

[2] From:   Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Tuesday, 09 Jun 2009 20:25:39 +0100
     Subj:   Re: SHK 20.0290 The Hounds of Theseus

[3] From:   Charlotte Pressler <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Tuesday, 9 Jun 2009 15:48:41 -0400
     Subj:   Re: SHK 20.0290 The Hounds of Theseus

[4] From:   David Frankel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Tuesday, 9 Jun 2009 17:29:32 -0400
     Subj:   RE: SHK 20.0290 The Hounds of Theseus

[5] From:   Judy Prince <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Tuesday, 9 Jun 2009 23:49:59 -0400
     Subj:   SHK 20.0290 The Hounds of Theseus

[6] From:   Hugh Grady <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:   Wednesday, 10 Jun 2009 10:40:49 -0400
     Subj:   RE: SHK 20.0290 The Hounds of Theseus


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 9 Jun 2009 19:59:07 +0100
Subject: 20.0290 The Hounds of Theseus
Comment:    Re: SHK 20.0290 The Hounds of Theseus

 >Why does Shakespeare have Theseus and Hippolyta talk about the hounds?
 >
 >What contribution does this discussion make to the themes of 
Midsummer's Night Dream?
 >
 >All the best,
 >Paul Swanson

It's only stuck in to set the groundlings rolling around the aisles 
laughing.

Robin Hamilton

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 09 Jun 2009 20:25:39 +0100
Subject: 20.0290 The Hounds of Theseus
Comment:    Re: SHK 20.0290 The Hounds of Theseus

Paul Swanson asks:

 >Why does Shakespeare have Theseus and Hippolyta
 >talk about the hounds [at the start of Act 4 of MND]?
 >What contribution does this discussion make to the
 >themes of Midsummer's Night Dream?

Stanley Wells argued that this exchange regarding the differing voices 
of the baying dogs illustrates the theme of unity-in-diversity, a 
concord or harmony that does not require sameness, "an agreement that 
can include disagreement" (Penguin edition of 1967, p. 31). The stage 
picture at this moment is of four sleeping lovers who were formerly at 
enmity, and the exchange of Theseus and Hippolyta about the "musical 
confusion" of the pack of hounds is another way of expressing the 
reconciliation of the competing love interests.

Social attitudes to such things change over time. Until just a few years 
ago one could witness in many parts of Britain a routine, familiar, and 
healthy outdoor pursuit undertaken by young and old, aristocrat and 
commoner, town-dweller and country-dweller, all coming together for a 
socially-cohesive and traditional purpose.  Since then a government ban 
has all but brought the long-standing practice to an end. I mean, of 
course, the tradition of hunt saboteuring.

Gabriel Egan

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Charlotte Pressler <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 9 Jun 2009 15:48:41 -0400
Subject: 20.0290 The Hounds of Theseus
Comment:    Re: SHK 20.0290 The Hounds of Theseus

Hippolyta begins by getting in a not-very-subtle dig at Theseus, who in 
the roster of Greek heroes occupied a distinctly lower place than 
Hercules, her former hunting companion. Her enforced match with Theseus 
may be diplomatically necessary, and as a queen, she is prepared to do 
the right thing by her country, but she is hardly enthusiastic about it, 
especially after she has had to listen to her future husband demand 
Hermia's submission to her father's will in Act 1. So she is getting 
what satisfaction she can from needling Theseus about his second-rank 
status. When Theseus assures her that his "hounds are bred out of the 
Spartan kind," Hippolyta, for the first time, sees a glimmer of 
consolation. Athens may be an awful place for an Amazon to have to live, 
but at least she can go hunting, and there's a good pack of dogs on the 
premises. It's after this scene that Hippolyta begins to thaw.

Charlotte Pressler
South Florida Community College
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       David Frankel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 9 Jun 2009 17:29:32 -0400
Subject: 20.0290 The Hounds of Theseus
Comment:    RE: SHK 20.0290 The Hounds of Theseus

For one thing, it provides a way of presenting the development of the 
relationship between Theseus and Hippolyta. Of course, there's more than 
one way to play it -- they can be delighted to discover that they have a 
shared passion in hunting hounds and music (one of the ties to the 
themes of the play, of course -- note the many uses of the terms 
concord, discord) -- or, Hippolyta can be lashing out at Theseus, 
putting him down by praising another, leading Theseus to argue back that 
his hounds (and, therefore he) are a match for those of Hercules.

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Judy Prince <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Tuesday, 9 Jun 2009 23:49:59 -0400
Subject: The Hounds of Theseus
Comment:    SHK 20.0290 The Hounds of Theseus

Paul Swanson wonders how the 'hounds" discussion between Hippolyta and 
Theseus in MND contributes to the play's themes.

The following makes sense to me, and may be helpful to Paul:

1]  After the Bottom'ed interlude, Theseus directs the couples: "lovers 
to bed", and in nearly the same breath: "sweet friends, to bed."

2]  One assumes that he and Hippolyta will bed that night, as well -- 
-- a moment which I believe was intended from this lively love play's 
beginning.

3]  I'll call the discussion "Hound Hunt Talk", and Theseus and 
Hippolyta are the talking hounds. The sexual wordplay's subtle to some, 
perhaps, but I think sufficiently contexted and convincing. Theseus 
begins the HHT:  "We will . . . up to the mountain's top,/ And mark the 
musical confusion/ Of hounds and echo in conjunction." [my underlining]

4]  Hippolyta, having heard the hounds of Sparta, advances the HHT: 
"Every region near/ Seemed all one mutual cry: I never heard/ So musical 
a discord, such sweet thanks."

5]  Theseus, whose hounds come from "the Spartan kind", compares his 
hounds with other animals, and finds his hounds more deliberate and 
effective:  "Slower in pursuit, but matched in mouth like bells,/ Each 
under each . . ."

6]  MND celebrates love and sensual pleasure. It favours lovers' choices 
for their mates [in contrast to arranged matches or matches not favoured 
by the female], whilst at the same time showing the irony of lovers' 
oft-daft choices. This play, like the playwright's other comedies, 
concludes with happy matchups --  -- rather a difficult logic to manage, 
one would think, given Shaksper's portrayal in MND of love's capricious 
leadings. I feel, though, that the playwright wanted to illumine love's 
singular strength -- -unanswerable to logic because it is not a thing of 
logic. It is love, and love is love: that which cannot be confined to 
definition and explanation, and is outside categorisation.

Best,
Judy

[6]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:       Hugh Grady <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Wednesday, 10 Jun 2009 10:40:49 -0400
Subject: 20.0290 The Hounds of Theseus
Comment:    RE: SHK 20.0290 The Hounds of Theseus

Innumerable critics have assessed the lines as metadramatic or 
meta-aesthetic comments on the play's heterogenous materials, numerous 
plots, and interacting layers of "reality" and the problem of 
unity/disunity they create. The theme comes up in several other places 
as well, as in the remarks about making a concord of this discord.

  -- Hugh Grady


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WT Crux

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 20.0300  Wednesday, 10 June 2009

From:       Val McDaniel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Wednesday, 10 Jun 2009 06:42:53 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:    Affection's Intensity Stabbing Centers and Communicating 
with Dreams

A question to the list. I'm curious what people have to say about the 
following old crux in Leontes Act I descent into madness.

This section, along with the trial scene's haunting "Your actions are my 
dreams," seems to carry a clue to Leontes central misunderstanding of 
the relationship between the world of imagination and the world of reality.

 From the Folio text of I.i

214: Affection? thy Intention stabs the Center.
215: Thou do'st make possible things not so held,
216: Communicat'st with Dreames (how can this be?)
217: With what's vnreall: thou coactiue art,
218: And fellow'st nothing. Then 'tis very credent,
219: Thou may'st co-ioyne with something, and thou do'st,
220: (And that beyond Commission)

The one thing that seems sure to me about this is that by "intention" 
Shakespeare means, as with his one other use of the word (in MWW), 
intensity. ("Intent" or "intendiment" is his standard word for the 
modern "intention.") But otherwise, I can only ask with Polixenes, "What 
means Sicilia?"

Yet at the same time I don't like the agnostic approach to this passage 
along the lines of "We know Leontes is working himself up into a frenzy 
but we can't follow his line of reasoning because he's not sane." 
Madness has a logic of its own, even if it's a mistaken logic and any 
actor, as well as the actor who would have created Leontes under 
Shakespeare's guidance, has to have his own idea of what Leontes is at 
least trying to say. (Whether that idea could have ever been precisely 
conveyed to an audience is another question.)

If we follow the standard emendation and assume the question mark after 
"affection" is misplaced, the next question is whether with "affection" 
Leontes is referring to his own jealous suspicion or Hermione's presumed 
passion for Polixenes. Lines 215 to 218 clearly favor the former 
interpretation but lines 219 and 220 favor the latter. To say Leontes is 
speaking of "passion" in general seems extremely unlikely - in his 
overwrought state he, even if he is indulging in philosophizing, he must 
have a very specific passion in mind here. A fourth possibility, that 
Polixenes presumed passion for Hermione is meant, seems like a very dark 
horse but if someone can make a coherent interpretation of the whole 
passage based on that starting point I would be glad to hear it.

Does Leontes try to talk himself off the ledge with "thou dost make 
possible things not so held," i.e. "jealous passion often imagines 
things that aren't real,"  only to push himself right over the edge by a 
comic application of Mad-Tea-Party logic with "...then tis very credent 
thou mayst cojoin with something."

Or is our text hopelessly corrupt?

Thanks,
Val

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
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