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Home :: Archive :: 2010 :: February ::
Giulio Romano

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0055  Tuesday, 2 February 2010

 

[1] From:     Martin Green < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:     January 30, 2010 6:47:53 PM EST

     Subj:     Re: SHK 21.0043 Giulio Romano 

 

[2] From:     William Godshalk < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:     January 31, 2010 6:43:09 PM EST

     Subj:     RE: SHK 21.0043  Giulio Romano 

 

[3] From:     Mary Ann Bushman < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:     February 1, 2010 3:43:47 PM EST

     Subj:     Giulio Romano 

 

[4] From:     Elliott Stone < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:     February 1, 2010 2:26:34 PM EST

     Subj:     Re: SHK 21.0043  Giulio Romano 

 

[5] From:     David Evett < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

     Date:     February 1, 2010 5:51:33 PM EST

     Subj:     Re: SHK 21.0043  Giulio Romano 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:         Martin Green < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         January 30, 2010 6:47:53 PM EST

Subject: 21.0043 Giulio Romano

Comment:      Re: SHK 21.0043 Giulio Romano

 

Paintings (or copies of paintings) by Julio (or Giulio) Romano are listed in "A Catalogue of the Pictures at Cowdray House" (the home of the Third Earl of Southampton's grandfather) published in 1777, and a book by Thomas Warton published in 1783 mentions "two pieces by Julio Romano, Assemblies of the Gods, in a great style." The paintings were destroyed by a fire on 24 September 1793. See W. H. St. John Hope, "Cowdray and Easebourne Priory in the County of Sussex" (London, Country Life, 1919), and Thomas Warton, "Specimen of a History of Oxfordshire" (London, J. Michels, J. Robson, C. Dills, 1783). (Cited in footnotes on pp 360-361 of my book, "Wriothesley's Roses.")

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:         William Godshalk < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         January 31, 2010 6:43:09 PM EST

Subject: 21.0043  Giulio Romano

Comment:      RE: SHK 21.0043  Giulio Romano

 

I do believe that I have heard it suggested (by Stephen Orgel perhaps) that some of Romano's paintings look as if they are pictures of statues. And they do, I think.

 

Bill

 

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:         Mary Ann Bushman < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         February 1, 2010 3:43:47 PM EST

Subject:      Giulio Romano

 

Stephen Orgel has a fascinating discussion of the reference to Giulio Romano in his book, Imagining Shakespeare (2003). See Chapter 5, The Pornographic Ideal. He argues that the name of Romano is less significant than the name it conceals: Aretino (p. 121).

 

Mary Ann Bushman

English Dept.

Illinois Wesleyan University

 

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:         Elliott Stone < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         February 1, 2010 2:26:34 PM EST

Subject: 21.0043  Giulio Romano

Comment:      Re: SHK 21.0043  Giulio Romano

 

Dr. Noemi Magri has written at great length on "Italian Renaisssance Art in Shakespeare: Giulio Romano and The Winter's Tale".

 

I do not want to repeat her thesis but I believe it is important to point out that Professor Ernest Gombrich (I studied with the great scholar in 1952) called Giulio Romano a "licentious genius" whose art celebrates the beauty of the human body in the "erotic" which becomes the "beautiful". If the statue of Hermione had been sculpted by Michelangelo or Raphael it would have quite different qualities.

 

It seems that the allusions to the pictures in "The Taming of the Shrew" have this Giulio Romano "erotic" quality. Shakespeare's two long poems "Venus and Adonis" and "Lucrece" have long detailed descriptions of art works that seem to be based on works of Giulio Romano that can be found at the Palazzo de Te in Mantua. None of Giulio Romano's paintings or drawings or coulored reproductions could be found in London in the 16th Century. (I certainly saw wonderful works by Giulio Romano in the Queen Elizabeth II Gallery in London two summers ago).

 

I believe that those critics that claim that Shakespeare made a "BLUNDER" in telling us that Giulio Romano was the artist who modelled and painted the so-called statue of Hermione are themselves wrong! Shakespeare's mention of Giulio Romano as a sculptor is historically true. We do not know if Shakespeare visited Mantua or was told by those that ??had visited Mantua of the celebrity of Giulio Romano.

 

Best, 

Elliott H. Stone

 

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:         David Evett < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

Date:         February 1, 2010 5:51:33 PM EST

Subject: 21.0043  Giulio Romano

Comment:      Re: SHK 21.0043  Giulio Romano

 

Pretty much all we know about Elizabethan and early Jacobean awareness of particular works of Continental art we know from such casual mentions as the one in the Winter's Tale. More systematic information about actual works mostly comes from inventories, typically made at the time of somebody's death, and the ones that survive mostly date from 1620 on.

 

Elizabethans mostly saw prints rather than paintings; I think there is some consensus that Shakespeare had seen engravings of Romano's wall-paintings in the Palazzo del Te in Milan, which are dominated by sculptural trompe l'oeil figures that might have persuaded the dramatist to identify as a sculptor somebody who was primarily a painter.

 

From 1560 or so on the dominant influences were from the Protestant parts of the Low Countries, as Protestant-Catholic animosity restricted English travel and other forms of cultural exchange with Italy (not that people did not go) and vice versa. Thanks in considerable measure to Henry Wotton, the pipeline opened after 1600, and the Earl of Arundel and others began to collect Italian paintings and sculpture, and to interest James I and especially Charles I in Italian and Spanish art, and the Continental artists -- Rubens, van Dyke -- who ornamented the Jacobean court were themselves more deeply and variously conversant with Italian painting that their predecessors. Sir Theodore Turquet de Mayerne, a Swiss who became royal physician to James I in 1606, was deeply interested in the technical aspects of painting and assembled a substantial MS of notes on notable artists and their work which has recently been published; it serves as a kind of 17th-century English equivalent to Vasari. I think it safe to assume that he talked to others about this enthusiasm.

 

David Evett

 

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