2010

Update


 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0040  Friday, 29 January 2010

 

From:         Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:          Friday, January 29, 2010       

Subject:      Update

 

Dear SHAKSPER Subscribers:

 

I am sorry that it is taking me so long to recover from my final PC crash and to migrate files and programs from my PCs to my Macs. After migrating files that I did not lose in the crash to my iMac and getting all of my hardware connected and working properly, I am now dealing with software matters -- what do I run in Windows 7 on a Virtual Machine (Fusion 3), what software do I replace with Mac versions, what software do I simply forget about. And then there are issues with the files I have generated in the past 28 since I got my first computer; I am especially concerned with important files like those for my finances and taxes (Quicken and TurboTax). 

 

As for SHAKSPER, I have decided about how I will read the messages that arrive in my Editor Inbox (Mac Mail program for Editor and Gmail account in Entourage for private correspondence) and how I will communicate with the listserv software to preserve security.  

 

More specifically, Mac Office 2008 is virtually a different program suite than its equivalents in Windows Office 2009. I developed a set of macros that I included in Word Quick Access Toolbar, something that does not seem to exist in Mac Word 2008. 

 

These are a few highlights to suggest the complexity of my moving into the Mac World and some of the reasons for my tardiness in getting back to editing SHAKSPER digests for you. 

 

As I was preparing this digest, I received some good news. The university where I worked for my entire adult life has just honored me with the designation of Professor Emeritus. The letter from the President, Dr. Mickey L. Burnim, reads in part, "The intent of this designation is to maintain a direct link to one who has been a highly valued faculty member at Bowie State University for thirty-two years and who earned the rank of Professor during that time.  /  We appreciate your many years of distinguished service and are privileged to bestow this small honor upon you."  I have mounted a copy of this letter on the SHAKSPER server:

 

http://www.shaksper.net/~hcook/Cook.pdf

 

I am honored. After being recognized in 1999 by University System of Maryland Board of Regents when I was awarded the Faculty Award for Excellence in Research and Scholarship, I am now being recognized by my institution. I am humbled, especially for one who was told by one of his high school English teachers that I should not go to college since I could not pass freshman composition and by one of his graduate professors who questioned my being in graduate school. My father always claimed that I was a "late-bloomer." 

 

I will try to get to the mail in my Editor's Inbox tomorrow, but my life would be easier if I were able to figure out how to execute the macros that I created in Word for Windows in Mac Word, but I will manage. 

 

Hardy M. Cook, Ph.D.

Professor Emeritus

Owner-Editor-Moderator of SHAKSPER

www.shaksper.net

Symposium: Seaborne Renaissance


The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0041  Saturday, 30 January 2010

 

From:          Ng, Su Fang <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:          January 21, 2010 9:47:43 AM EST

Subject:       Symposium: Seaborne Renaissance

 

Dear Colleagues,

 

I would like to call your attention to a symposium on "Seaborne Renaissance: Global Exchanges and Religion in Early Modernity" to be held at the University of Texas, Austin on February 6, 2010 (a Saturday). We will have a full day of interdisciplinary talks in the exciting new area of global studies and would be delighted if you could join us.

 

For further information, please see below. Details can also be found on the webpage of the UT Department of English:

 

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/english/conferences/current-conferences/seaborne-renaissance.php

 

We would also be very grateful if you would forward this announcement to any colleagues or students who might be interested.

 

Best,

Su Fang Ng

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

2009-10 Harrington Faculty Fellow, Department of English, University of Texas, Austin

Associate Professor, Department of English, University of Oklahoma, Norman

 

 

SEABORNE RENAISSANCE:

Global Exchanges and Religion in Early Modernity

A One-Day Symposium

 

Harry Ransom Center

Prothro Theater

University of Texas at Austin

February 6, 2010

 

Rereading Europe's relation to its Others, these interdisciplinary talks will forge new ways of thinking about cross-cultural relations, religious conflict, and the ways in which the sea serves as conduit for translating goods, peoples, and ideas.

 

SPEAKERS:

 

Bernadette Andrea, English, University of Texas, San Antonio

"Turbans and Crosses, Circassians and Carmelites: Convertibility in Early Modern Accounts of Anglo-Persian Exchanges"

 

Richmond Barbour, English, Oregon State University

"Captivity, Embargo, Blockade: English Mariners in Arabia and India, 1608-1612."

 

Giancarlo Casale, History, University of Minnesota

"The Worlds of Hajji Ahmed: A Sixteenth-Century Ottoman's Vision of Europe ?and Empire"

 

Kumkum Chatterjee, History, Pennsylvania State University

"South Asian Cosmopolitanism in the Early Modern Era"

 

Bindu Malieckal, English, Saint Anselm College

"Muslims, Christians, and Spices: Renaissance Re-Tellings of Religious Conflict in the Indian Ocean, from East Africa to South India"

 

Robert Markley, English, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

"Trade, Religion, and the East India Company in the Seventeenth Century"

 

Jyotsna Singh, English, Michigan State University

"Jahangir's Mughal Court as a "Contact Zone": Translation and Traffic in Early Anglo-Muslim Encounters"

 

Daniel Vitkus, English, Florida State University

"'The Only Moderne People': Anglo-Islamic Exchange, Capitalism, and Early Modernity."

 

DISCUSSANTS

 

Samuel Baker, English, University of Texas at Austin

Tarek El-Ariss, Middle Eastern Studies, University of Texas at Austin

Cynthia Talbot, History, University of Texas at Austin

Hannah Wojciehowski, English, University of Texas at Austin

 

This symposium is sponsored by the Donald D. Harrington Faculty Fellows Program at the University of Texas at Austin, with co-sponsorship from the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, the South Asia Institute, and the Harry Ransom Center.

 

Giulio Romano


The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0043  Saturday, 30 January 2010

 

From:         Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 18, 2010 10:35:27 AM EST

Subject:      Giulio Romano

 

Colleagues:

 

Is there a way to identify which works of Giulio Romano would have been known in England when Shakespeare wrote The Winter's Tale? Were any of his works in London? As he is primarily identified as a painter today, is there a reason for Shakespeare to have treated him as a sculptor?

 

Jack Heller

 

_______________________________________________________________

S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List

Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

 

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

 

Early Modern Literary Studies, Special Issue 19



	

			

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0042  Saturday, 30 January 2010

 

From:          Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:          Friday 1/15/2010 6:50 PM

Subject:       Early Modern Literary Studies, Special Issue 19

 

To whom it may concern:

 

A special issue of EMLS has been posted. As usual, it is available for download free and without subscription at the following web address: http://purl.org/emls

 

The table of contents follows.

 

Sincerely,

Sean Lawrence.

 

 

Early Modern Literary Studies

Special Issue 19 (2009) 

Embodying Shakespeare

Edited by David McInnis and Brett D. Hirsch

 

Articles: 

 

Embodying Shakespeare: Introduction. David McInnis (University of Melbourne) and Brett D. Hirsch (University of Victoria).

 

How Should One Read a Shakespeare Sonnet? Bruce R. Smith (University of Southern California).

 

Tragicomic Transformations: Passion, Politics, and the "Art to Turn" in Fletcher's The Island Princess. Jean E. Feerick (Brown University).

 

Counterfeit Professions: Jewish Daughters and the Drama of Failed Conversion in Marlowe's The Jew of Malta and Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice. Brett D. Hirsch (University of Victoria).

 

Perceiving Shakespeare: A Study of Sight, Sound, and Stage. Jennifer Rae McDermott (University of Toronto).

 

Horticulture of the Head: The Vegetable Life of Hair in Early Modern English Thought. Edward J. Geisweidt (University of Alabama).

 

Mind-Travelling, Ideal Presence and the Imagination in Early Modern England. David McInnis (University of Melbourne).

 

"die a rare example": Beheading the Body on the Jacobean Stage. Fiona Martin (University of Waikato).

 

"A nature but infected": Plague and Embodied Transformation in Timon of Athens. Darryl Chalk (University of Southern Queensland).

 

"Enamoured of thy parts:" Dismemberment and Domesticity in Romeo and Juliet. Ariane M. Balizet (Texas Christian University).

 

Antony's Body. Joyce Green MacDonald (University of Kentucky).

 

 

Shorter Articles: 

 

Hamlet, the Pirate's Son. Mary Floyd-Wilson (The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill).

 

Is There Life After Sex?: Macbeth and Post-Sexuality. Helen Ostovich (McMaster University).

 

 

Review Essay: 

 

Differing Returns: On History, Bodies and Early Modern Lives. Laurie Johnson (University of Southern Queensland).

 

Review: 

Amanda Bailey. Flaunting: Style and the Subversive Male Body in Renaissance England. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 2007. Jason Freddi (University of Melbourne).

 

Good Marriages in Shakespeare



	

			

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0045  Saturday, 30 January 2010

 

[1] From:    Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:    January 15, 2010 12:31:58 PM EST

     Subj:    Re: SHK 21.0037  Good Marriages in Shakespeare 

 

[2] From:    David Basch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:    January 15, 2010 3:47:03 PM EST

     Subj:    Re: SHK 21.0037  Good Marriages in Shakespeare 

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:         Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         January 15, 2010 12:31:58 PM EST

Subject: 21.0037  Good Marriages in Shakespeare

Comment:      Re: SHK 21.0037  Good Marriages in Shakespeare

 

I'm honestly skeptical of giving to Claudius ("no place indeed should murder sanctuarize") the ethical summary of the play. Villains typically don't get to play that role; in fact, it's usually the reverse.

 

I have always understood this as an ironic comment (by WS, not Claudius) on Hamlet's reluctance to kill Claudius in the "chapel scene."

 

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------

From:          David Basch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:          January 15, 2010 3:47:03 PM EST

Subject: 21.0037  Good Marriages in Shakespeare

Comment:       Re: SHK 21.0037  Good Marriages in Shakespeare

 

As his first point, Justin Alexander notes that in Hamlet even Gertrude mentions the hastiness of her marriage to Claudius. But there is no indication that anyone considers this a gross impropriety but merely something that the situation had called for, created by the sudden vacuum of King Hamlet's death and the challenge made by Fortinbras.

 

This outcome is not acceptable to young Hamlet for obvious reasons. But he goes on not only to revile the hasty marriage but also the very idea of a middle-aged Queen seeming to want and enjoy her new marriage. Lynn Brenner commented on Hamlet's reaction as revealing him grossly disgusted at his mother, about which I agree with her reaction to young Hamlet.

 

Concerning Justin's second point, I am not clear as to what he means by the words, "giving to Claudius the ethical summary of the play."

 

From the events of the play to that point it appears that King Claudius is almost perfectly in the right. He justifies the hastiness of the marriage on grounds of necessity, posed by the challenge of Fortinbras that had to be answered. The implication is that it had already been assumed by the Danish court council that Hamlet, who was away at the university, was young and untried and that a mature, capable Claudius answered the country's need.

 

Claudius quickly demonstrates his capability by taking proper diplomatic moves to quiet the challenge, keeping the nation out of war. The new king seemed to have justified to all the wisdom of the decision to raise him to kingship and marriage to the queen. It is within this context that Hamlet reveals his state of mind and disgust at his mother's action. How does this lead to a moral justification of Claudius beyond the immediate setting, in which no one knows that he had murdered his brother?

 

David Basch

 

 

_______________________________________________________________

S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List 

Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net

 

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

 

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