2010

Musings on the Arden Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0128  Thursday, 18 March 2010

From:        John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:        March 11, 2010 4:06:02 PM EST
Subject: 21.0112  Musings on the Arden Shakespeare
Comment:     Re: SHK 21.0112  Musings on the Arden Shakespeare

Steve Roth wrote:

>Having been in the book publishing business for 25 years, I really
>have to question the competence of a publishing operation that in
>this day and age can't make its books available through the 1) most
>important and 2) most perfectly targeted outlets.

Not exactly. If Amazon think sales justify it, they will hold a book in stock (as, presumably, will the U Chicago Co-op bookstore) -- and Amazon UK do indeed stock it. The constant change of publisher is probably what has caught out Amazon in this case -- they may well be trying to order it from the wrong US warehouse.

John Briggs

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

 

Staged Reading of The Taming of the Shrew

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0129  Friday, 26 March 2010

From:         Austin SHAKESPEARE <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         March 22, 2010 8:43:05 AM EDT
Subject:      The Taming of the Shrew Opens Thursday - 3 Performances Only

Artistic Director: Ann Ciccolella
Managing Director: Alex Alford

A Staged Reading With A Cast Of All Women
8:00 PM March 25, 26, 27, 2010
Directed By Ann Ciccolella
Tickets $24 with Discounts Available

Jill Swanson as Petruchio and Gwen Kelso as Kate

Featuring Babs George, Jill Blackwood, Jenny Larson, Linda Nenno, Karen Jambon, Kara Bliss Galbraith, Mary Alice Carnes and Bernadette Nason

Professional/Actors' Equity Staged Reading

In Shakespeare's time, only men were allowed on stage. Now we will turn the tables. In this classic comedy, Austin's finest actresses will take the stage in this replica of an Elizabethan Theatre: Richard Garriott's Curtain Theatre.

Join us in this beautiful setting amid a pecan grove on the shores of Lake Austin off City Park Rd, near Rts 2222 and 360.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

 

Double Hamlets

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0131  Friday, 26 March 2010

[1]  From:      Matteo Pangallo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:      March 18, 2010 4:03:41 PM EDT
     Subj:      Re: Double Hamlets 

[2]  From:      Michael Yawney <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:      March 18, 2010 4:12:02 PM EDT
     Subj:      RE: SHK 21.0123  Double Hamlets

[3]  From:      Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:      March 18, 2010 4:19:46 PM EDT
     Subj:      RE: SHK 21.0123  Double Hamlets 

[4]  From:      Kevin J Donovan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:      March 18, 2010 4:27:12 PM EDT
     Subj:      Re: SHK 21.0123  Double Hamlets 

[5]  From:      Conrad Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:      March 19, 2010 1:49:44 AM EDT
     Subj:      Re: SHAKSPER Digest - 16 Mar 2010 to 18 Mar 2010 (#2010-23)

[6]  From:      Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:      Friday, March 26, 2010   
     Subj:      Re: SHK 21.0123  Double Hamlets 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:         Matteo Pangallo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         March 18, 2010 4:03:41 PM EDT
Subject:      Re: Double Hamlets

Hannibal Hamlin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> wrote:

>An Irish friend just informed me of a production of Hamlet he's
>seen recently that featured two actors in the lead role -- i.e.,
>dividing the role between them in a single production. I'm not
>sure of the details, i.e., how it was divided up, but has anyone
>heard of this being done before?

I've never heard of this with Hamlet, but I have been involved with productions that divided up other characters.

I performed in a production of Julius Caesar and split the role of Brutus with my identical twin brother: his Brutus was the "rational" side of the character (the one, for example, who delivers the funeral oration and who ultimately commits suicide) and mine was the "emotional" (the one who actually stabs Caesar) -- none of the characters (including the two of us) could see the other Brutus. It also allowed us to make the "It must be by his death" soliloquy into a kind of dialogue.

The other split-character I've been involved with was Ariel in a production of Tempest that I directed several years ago; one Ariel attempted to win Prospero's favor (and thus freedom) by doing everything possible to please him, the other did everything possible to spite him. The two Ariels made it possible to stage some amusing "magic" business (for example, in the log scene or with the harpy), particularly because none of the other characters (including Prospero) "knew" or could "see" that there were two of them.

I have no objections to this kind of theatrical device if there is a clear reason for the choice and if the audience can grasp those reasons. If the device does not inform the production somehow, however, then it would strike me merely as a gimmick for the sake of novelty and spectacle. It risks becoming more a distraction than a contribution to the performance if done poorly.

Matteo A. Pangallo
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.umass.edu/renaissance

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:         Michael Yawney <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         March 18, 2010 4:12:02 PM EDT
Subject: 21.0123  Double Hamlets
Comment:      RE: SHK 21.0123  Double Hamlets

Dividing Hamlet up has been done before.

Off the top of my head, I recall Travis Preston had four Hamlets in his production at NYU late 1980s.

Hope this helps,
Michael Yawney

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:         Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         March 18, 2010 4:19:46 PM EDT
Subject: 21.0123  Double Hamlets
Comment:      RE: SHK 21.0123  Double Hamlets

I saw a Columbia University School of the Arts production that divided up the Hamlets and practically every other major character, too.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:         Kevin J Donovan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         March 18, 2010 4:27:12 PM EDT
Subject: 21.0123  Double Hamlets
Comment:      Re: SHK 21.0123  Double Hamlets

The most recent issue of The Shakespeare Newsletter contains a review by Bernice W. Kliman of a production this past summer by The Hudson Warehouse featuring three actors playing Hamlet "interactively." She also refers in passing to a 1976 production "with twin actors playing Hamlet as angel and devil respectively."

Kevin J. Donovan
Professor and Graduate Program Director
Department of English
Middle Tennessee State University

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:         Conrad Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         March 19, 2010 1:49:44 AM EDT
Subject:      Re: SHAKSPER Digest - 16 Mar 2010 to 18 Mar 2010 (#2010-23)

Hannibal Hamlin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> wrote:

>An Irish friend just informed me of a production of Hamlet he's
>seen recently that featured two actors in the lead role -- i.e.,
>dividing the role between them in a single production. I'm not
>sure of the details, i.e., how it was divided up, but has anyone
>heard of this being done before?

Yes, in prison.

Prisoners in the US are sometimes given Shakespearean plays, and often _Hamlet_, to perform as a kind of performance art therapy. The lead role is split among four prisoner actors, who are all on the stage at once and rotate about every sentence, as I recall.

They had a bit of it on the radio. The reporter said the production "works." The part I heard, well, sounded like it was being recited by prisoners in rotation. Hard to judge from a sound bite; I'm sure such a production could work.

Conrad.

PS - They also only did act 5.

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:          Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:          Friday, March 26, 2010   
Subject: 21.0123  Double Hamlets
Comment:       Re: SHK 21.0123  Double Hamlets

Not exactly Hamlet but Todd Haynes's 2007 film _I'm Not There_ has six characters (played by Christian Bale, Cate Blanchett, Marcus Carl Franklin, Richard Gere, Heath Ledger, and Ben Whishaw) embodying different aspects of Bob Dylan's life, work, and public persona. The film opens with the caption: "Inspired by the music and the many lives of Bob Dylan." Except for the caption and credits, Dylan's name does not appear in the film itself.

_______________________________________________________________
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Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

 

March 26 Shakespeare Symposium at Rhodes College

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0130  Friday, 26 March 2010

From:         Scott Newstok <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         March 21, 2010 1:48:47 PM EDT
Subject:      March 26 Shakespeare Symposium at Rhodes College

Green Shakespeare: A Symposium on Environmental Studies and the Bard will be held from 2-5pm on Friday, March 26 at Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee; the event is free and open to the public.

Robert Watson (UCLA) will deliver a keynote lecture on the Ecology of Self, or permeable human boundaries in "A Midsummer Night's Dream."

A roundtable discussion about the state of the field will follow, with four respondents:

Daniel Brayton (Middlebury College)
Simon Estok (Sungkyunkwan University)
Sharon O'Dair (University of Alabama)
Karen Raber (University of Mississippi)

The symposium is co-sponsored by the Dr. Iris A. Pearce Shakespeare Endowment and the Rhodes Environmental Program, with additional support from the Rhodes College Center for Outreach in the Development of the Arts (CODA).

For further information, please see the Shakespeare at Rhodes website:

http://www.rhodes.edu/shakespeare/

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

 

Announcement: The Shakespeare Encyclopedia at the SAA

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0132  Friday, 26 March 2010

From:       Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:       Friday, March 26, 2010       
Subject:    Announcement: The Shakespeare Encyclopedia at the SAA

On Saturday evening, April 3, there will be an open house for the ABC-CLIO/Greenwood 5-volume work _The Shakespeare Encyclopedia: Life, Works, World, and Legacy_ edited by Patricia Parker, Professor of Comparative Literature and Margery Bailey Professor in English and Dramatic Literature at Stanford University. The open house will be from 6:00 pm until 10:00 pm, where there will be a visual installation of images from it. The _Encyclopedia_ is to be released in the fall, and convention attendees are eligible for a 20% discount.

THE SHAKESPEARE ENCYCLOPEDIA
Life, Works, World, and Legacy
Edited by Patricia Parker

The most comprehensive work of its kind, this fully illustrated 5-volume encyclopedia draws upon the expertise of an internationally renowned advisory and editorial board and hundreds of stellar contributors to detail Shakespeare's life, works, world, and legacy through nearly 4,000 alphabetically arranged entries.

Advisory Board:
Stephen Greenblatt, Andrew Gurr, Jean E. Howard, Frank Kermode, Arthur R Kinney, Peter Lake, Jill L Levenson, Ania Loomba, Laurie Maguire, Gail Kern Paster, Lois Potter, Stanley Wells

Editorial Board:
Joel B. Altman, Robert Bearman, Gordon Braden, Douglas Bruster, Colin Burrow, John D. Cox, Margreta de Grazia, Mario DiGangi, Lukas Erne, Hugh Grady, Werner Habicht, Kim F. Hall, Michael Hattaway, Robert Henke? Peter Holland, Lorna Hutson, John Kerrigan, Natasha Korda, Douglas M. Lanier, Francois Laroque, Lawrence Manley, Jean L Marsden, Barbara A. Mowat, Steven Mullaney, Michael Neill, Laurie E. Osborne, Adrian Poole, Eric Rasmussen, Mary Beth Rose, Julie Sanders, Stuart Sillars, Bruce R. Smith, Tiffany Stern, Gordon Teskey, Daniel Vitkus, Paul Werstine

Associate Editor: Trey Jansen 
Assistant Editor: Alysia Kolentsis
Illustrations Editors: Peter Holland, Alexander C. Y. Huang, Douglas M. Lanier, Stuart Sillars

CONTRIBUTORS: Over 300 expert contributors from the US, UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Europe, Africa, Asia, Latin America and other parts of the world, with entries ranging from under 100 to over 6,000 words

THE SHAKESPEARE ENCYCLOPEDIA TOPICS include (in addition to major entries on each of Shakespeare's works): acting and playgoing (Elizabethan and Jacobean), actors' parts, apprentices, companies, rehearsal, stage directions, and early theater terms, actors, directors, theater companies, performance histories, adaptations and appropriations (drama, poetry, novels; travesties, burlesques; gothic, romance, mystery, detective, science fiction; art; ballet, dance; music, including opera, musicals, pop music, jazz), advertising, Algiers, Bohemia, Constantinople, Egypt, France, India, Italy, Morocco, Persia, Russia, Tunis, and other places important in the plays, including Britain, England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, aliens and foreigners, America (colonial to present), animals, animation, comics, cartoons, arithmetic, calculation, nothing / noting, "O", authorship, bastardy, battles (Actium, Agincourt, and others), bearbaiting, Bible (and related entries), blackness, blackface, whiteness, body, melancholy, humors, passions, Bollywood, Broadway, carnival, entertainments, games, pageants, popular culture, censorship, characters, childbirth, chronology, collaboration, canon, circumcision, colonialism, postcolonialism, commedia dell'arte, conduct books, costumes and clothing, crime, punishment, torture, treason, criticism and theory, cross-dressing, cuckoldry, disease, plague, death, doubling, economic, political, social contexts (including enclosures, household organization, inheritance, laws, literacy, mercantilism, money, nationhood, old age, poverty, servants, vagrancy), editing, education, electronic resources, fairies, ghosts, witches, fencing, dueling, hunting, food, drink, fools, clowns, friendship, gender and sexuality (including feminism, homoeroticism, lesbianism), genres, global Shakespeares, with entries on African, Arab, Asian, Caribbean, European, Latin American, and other translation, appropriation, and performance histories, films, actors, directors, and kabuki, kathakali, kyogen, noh, and other stagings, humanism, Jews, language, wordplay, rhetoric, metrics, and related terms, madness, marriage, memory, forgetting, monsters, New World, portraits, monuments, publication, printing, race, racial cross-casting, radio, recordings, television, videos, DVDs, religion, science, alchemy, astrology, medicine, scolds, shrews, talkativeness, tongues, screen adaptation and individual films, Shakespeare's life, family, contemporaries (literary and other), skepticism, slavery, sleep, dreams, songs, music, dances (in the plays), sources, analogues, backgrounds, spying, Stratford, London, travel, geography, maps, Turks, renegades, Barbary Coast, twins, visual and material culture, war, women and women writers, 16th to 21st century, Yiddish theater, YouTube, and many more

TOPICAL as well as ALPHABETICAL LISTS of entries are useful for researching and teaching particular topics and works 

CROSS-REFERENCES enable easy movement between related topics, while words in boldface in each entry lead to other entries throughout the encyclopedia

APPENDICES include a timeline of Shakespeare's life and important events; genealogy and map (for history plays and other entries); names of characters in each play; general bibliography (in addition to Further Reading in individual entries); films and television productions; videos and DVDs; lists of fiction (mystery, romance, fantasy and science fiction in print, TV, and film) and children's (and young adult) literature related to Shakespeare and his works; electronic and online resources, including library databases and other sites (supplementing entries on databases of Shakespeare in performance, electronic editions, and other topics).

Release is scheduled for September 2010, 2,280 pp., 8 1/2 x 11, ISBN 978-0-313-33639-3, eISBN: 978-0-313-05589-8

Further information online at www.abc-clio.com, by telephone 1.800.368.6868, or fax 1.866.270.3856

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

 

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