2010

New Edition of EMLS Available

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0188  Monday, 3 May 2010

From:         Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         April 28, 2010 9:47:00 PM EDT
Subject:      New Edition of EMLS Available

To whom it may concern: 

Issue 15.1 of _EMLS_ has been posted. As usual, it is available for download free and without subscription at the following web address: http://purl.org/emls

The table of contents follows. 

Sincerely,
Sean Lawrence

Early Modern Literary Studies 15.1 (2009-10)

Articles: 

Iago and Equivocation: The Seduction and Damnation of Othello. [1] R. M. Christofides, Independent Scholar.

Style, statistics, and new models of authorship. [2] Hugh Craig, University of Newcastle.
Coriolanus and the Paradox of Place. [3] Doug Eskew, Colorado State University-Pueblo.

"Away, Stand off, I say": Women's Appropriations of Restraint and Constraint in The Birth of Merlin and The Devil is an Ass. [4] Sarah E. Johnson, McMaster University.

Salerio, Solanio, and "all the boys in Venice". [5] Mark Jones, Trinity Christian College.

"A cypress, not a bosom, hides my heart": Olivia's Veiled Conversions. [6] Amy L. Smith, Kalamazoo College, and Elizabeth Hodgson, University of British Columbia.

"Have I Caught Thee?": Cordelia and the Runaway Jesus. [7] Robert W. Reeder, Providence College.

Poetic Statesmanship and the Politics of Patronage in the Early Tudor Court: Material Concerns of John Skelton's Early Career as a Critical Context for the Interpretation of The Bowge of Courte. [8] Ray Siemens, University of Victoria.

Tyrant, Thy Name is King: The Tragedy of Tiberius and Neo-Stoic Taciteanism. [9] Iclal Cetin, State University of New York Fredonia.
 

Review-essay:

Bradin Cormack, A Power to Do Justice: Jurisdiction, English Literature, and the Rise of Common Law, 1509-1625. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2007; Lorna Hutson, The Invention of Suspicion: Law and Mimesis in Shakespeare and Renaissance Drama. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2007; Dennis Kezar, ed., Solon and Thespis: Law and Theater in the English Renaissance. Notre Dame IN: U of Notre Dame P, 2007; Elliott Visconsi, Lines of Equity: Literature and the Origins of Law in Later Stuart England. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 2008. [10] Curtis Perry, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign.
 

Reviews: 

Janet Bertsch. Storytelling in the Works of Bunyan, Grimmelshausen, Defoe, and Schnabel. Rochester: Camden House, 2004.  [11] Gerd Bayer, Erlangen University.

Sylvia Adamson, Gavin Alexander, and Katrin Ettenhuber, eds. Renaissance Figures of Speech. [12] Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2007. Melissa Hudler, Lamar University and Anglia Ruskin University. 

Heather Wolfe, ed. The Literary Career and Legacy of Elizabeth Cary, 1613-1680. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. [13] Daniel J. Cadman, Sheffield Hallam University.

Keith Brown. Sightings: Selected Literary Essays. Ed. Erik Tonning. Bern, Switzerland: Peter Lang, 2008. [14] W. L. Godshalk, University of Cincinnati.

Paul A. Kottman. A Politics of the Scene. Stanford: Stanford UP, 2007. [15] Renuka Gusain, Wayne State University.

Donald Stump and Susan M. Felch, eds. Elizabeth I and Her Age. New York: W. W. Norton, 2009. [16] Lisa Hopkins, Sheffield Hallam University.

Sujata Iyengar. Shades of Difference. Mythologies of Skin Color in Early Modern England. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 2005. [17] Anu Korhonen, University of Helsinki.

Patrick Cheney. Shakespeare's Literary Authorship. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2008. [18] Jonathan P. Lamb, The University of Texas at Austin.

Helen Ostovich, Mary V. Silcox, and Graham Roebuck (eds.), The Mysterious and the Foreign in Early Modern England. Newark: U of Delaware P, 2008. [19] David McInnis, University of Melbourne.

Chanita Goldblatt and Howard Kreisel, eds. Tradition, Heterodoxy and Religious Culture: Judaism and Christianity in the Early Modern Period. Beer Sheva: Ben-Gurion U of the Negev P, 2006.  [20] Bradford McCall, Regent University, Virginia Beach, Virginia.

Barbara Ravelhofer. The Early Stuart Masque: Dance Costume and Music. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. [21] Lesley Mickel, Glasgow University.

Joseph Black, ed. The Martin Marprelate Tracts. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2008. [22] Joseph Navitsky, University of Southern Mississippi.

Regina Schwartz. Sacramental Poetics at the Dawn of Secularism: When God Left the World. Stanford: Stanford UP, 2008. [23] Joseph Sterrett, Cardiff University, Wales.

Stephen M. Fallon. Milton's Peculiar Grace: Self-Representation and Authority. Ithaca and London: Cornell UP, 2007. [24] David V. Urban, Calvin College.

Sharon Cadman Seelig. Autobiography and Gender in Early Modern Literature: Reading Women's Lives 1600-1680 . Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2006. Kate Chedgzoy. Women's Writing in the British Atlantic World, Memory, Place and History, 1550-1700 . Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2007. [25] Paul Salzman, La Trobe University.

Nigel Smith. Is Milton Better Than Shakespeare? Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard UP, 2008. [26] William Walker, University of New South Wales.

The English Poems of George Herbert. Ed. Helen Wilcox. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2007. [27] P.G. Stanwood, University of British Columbia.
 

Theatre Reviews: 

A New Way to Pay Old Debts, presented by the University of Tampa Department of Speech, Theater and Dance at the David Falk Theater, Tampa, FL, 27-29 March 2009. Lizz Angello, University of South Florida. [28]

Julius Caesar, presented at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival, Stratford, Ontario, 6 June-17 October 2009. M. G. Aune, California University of Pennsylvania. [29]

Dido Queen of Carthage presented by the National Theatre at the Cottesloe Theatre, London, March-June 2009. [30]Chris Butler, Sheffield Hallam University.

Troilus and Cressida presented at Shakespeare's Globe Theatre, London, 13th August 2009, Julia Daly.[31] 

Macbeth, Julius Caesar, A Midsummer Night's Dream and Bartholomew Fair, performed by the Stratford Shakespeare Festival, Stratford, Ontario, June-October 2009. Jonathan Goossen, Dalhousie University. [32] 

Twelfth Night, presented by the St. Petersburg Little Theatre, St. Petersburg, Florida, June 12-28, 2009. Cameron Hunt McNabb, University of South Florida. [33] 

Othello, presented by Northern Broadsides at Trafalgar Studios, London, 3 October 2009. Kevin De Ornellas, University of Ulster. [34] 

Macbeth, presented by the Royal Exchange Theatre Company at the Royal Exchange Theatre, Manchester, 6 March 2009. Kevin De Ornellas, University of Ulster. [35] 

Timon of Athens, presented at Shakespeare's Globe Theatre, London, 30 August 2008. Kevin De Ornellas, University of Ulster. [36] 

The Comedy of Errors, presented by the Oregon Shakespeare Festival at the Elizabethan Stage/Allen Pavilion in Ashland, Oregon, 15 June- 12 October 2008. Geoff Ridden, Southern Oregon University. [37] 

Macbeth, presented by the Oregon Shakespeare Festival at the Angus Bowmer Theatre in Ashland, Oregon, 13 February- 1 November 2009. Geoff Ridden, Southern Oregon University. [38]

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

 

CPF: Shakespearean Performance Research Group of the

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0189  Monday, 3 May 2010

From:         Frank Hildy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         May 3, 2010 3:38:13 PM EDT
Subject:      CPF: Shakespearean Performance Research Group of the ASTR

Readers of SHAKSPER may be interested in the following call for papers. 

CPF: Shakespearean Performance Research Group of the American Society for Theatre Research (ASTR)

Deadline: May 31, 2010 for ASTR conference to be held November 18-21, 2010 at the Renaissance Hotel, Seattle- Downtown.

Send proposals to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

The Shakespearean Performance Research Group of the American Society for Theatre Research (ASTR)

The Shakespearean Performance Research Group provides an ongoing home for the study of Shakespearean performance within ASTR. For the 2010 conference, "Embodying Power: Work Over Time," we seek papers that address issues relating to the history, theory, and practice of Shakespeare performance. While research group papers need not be tied to the conference theme, our inquiries do engage with several areas germane to the themes of the Seattle conference. For example, we would like to invite papers that, broadly speaking, interrogate the "work" of Shakespeare performance. We have in mind the tension, reciprocity, overlap between several different senses of "work": the relationship between the literary "work," the "work" on stage, and the "work" of the professional theatre; how working on and with Shakespearean writing and performance has been constituted historically and theoretically; the "work" that Shakespeare performance might be said to accomplish; or the ways in which the reputation of Shakespearean "work" has been used to validate or legitimize performance as a profession and field of inquiry. As corporate entities gain nearly unlimited powers of "speech," are there ways in which the Shakespearean literary/theatrical corpus claims for itself powers to speak culturally in ways that may overwhelm other voices? We seek to interrogate such speech, work and power, and their embodiment in Shakespearean performance.

At this year's conference, we are planning to collaborate for at least a portion of our session with members of the "New Approaches to Plays from the Spanish Golden Age" working group, and so also welcome papers that look at the relationship between Shakespearean theatre and that of the Spanish Golden Age.

Those wishing to propose a paper should submit a 200-word abstract and 50-word academic biographical statement, including current affiliation(s), if any, by Monday, May 31st, 2010, to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

(proposals also can be mailed to: 

Don Weingust,
Center for Shakespeare Studies,
Southern Oregon University,
1250 Siskiyou Boulevard,
Ashland, OR 97520).

Selected papers will be assigned to subgroups by the group's conveners, 

Catherine Burriss,
Franklin J. Hildy,
Robert Ormsby,
Don Weingust and
W. B. Worthen, 

and the conveners will organize on-line communication of subgroup members before the conference. At the three-hour conference session, papers will be discussed first within the subgroups, after which the groups will come together to exchange ideas.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

 

Query: Jaques

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0191  Monday, 3 May 2010

[1]  From:      Peter Holland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:      April 29, 2010 7:33:06 AM EDT
     Subj:      RE: SHK 21.0187  Query: Jaques

[2]  From:      Robert Projansky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:      April 30, 2010 8:52:07 PM EDT
     Subj:      Re: SHK 21.0187  Query: Jaques
 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:         Peter Holland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         April 29, 2010 7:33:06 AM EDT
Subject: 21.0187  Query: Jaques
Comment:      RE: SHK 21.0187  Query: Jaques

>Greetings. I am currently part of a production of As You Like It. The
>director has suggested that perhaps Jaques is Duke Senior's younger
>brother. This would help explain why Jaques is permitted to speak with
>such candor to the Duke (besides the fact that everyone is in Arden,
>where many transgressions are permitted).
>
>Having two groups of three brothers has a certain appealing symmetry as
>well.
>
>Are there reasons against this interpretation?
>
>While the matter won't be announced to the audience, it does bear on the
>actors' choices. Any insight are welcome. 

Surely Duke Senior and Duke Frederick's missing brother is the 'old religious uncle' who 'taught [Rosalind] to speak' and is obviously the same 'old religious man' who conveniently and quickly converts Duke Frederick on the 'skirts' of the forest of Arden!

[2]=============================================================
From:         Robert Projansky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         April 30, 2010 8:52:07 PM EDT
Subject: 21.0187  Query: Jaques
Comment:      Re: SHK 21.0187  Query: Jaques

Noel Sloboda says, in pertinent part:

>Greetings. I am currently part of a production of As You Like It. The
>director has suggested that perhaps Jaques is Duke Senior's younger
>brother. This would help explain why Jaques is permitted to speak with
>such candor to the Duke (besides the fact that everyone is in Arden,
>where many transgressions are permitted).
>
>Having two groups of three brothers has a certain appealing symmetry as
>well.
>
>Are there reasons against this interpretation?                         

Are there reasons for this interpretation? Where does it come from? What's the point? What will it add to the play for the guy (I hope) playing Jaques to remember a childhood filled with fratrigenic torments -- or kindnesses? Would imagining a new kid-brotherness really enhance an actor's ability to counterfeit the attitudes and behavior called for by the actor-proof role ofJaques?Beyond the performances heretofore managed by non-sibling Jaqueses over the last four centuries? As long as your director is making it up, how about Jaques as the Duke's blackmailer or his accountant, dad or boyfriend? Or all of the above?

And what more explanation for Jaques's candor is necessary than that Jacques is a smart-mouth non-stop ever-curious full-of-himself philosophizing waspish tactless kvetcher whom the good-natured Duke finds interesting and entertaining, e.g., "full of matter"? Also, Jacques and the others have voluntarily followed the exiled Duke Senior out to the boonies, where he has no authority beyond whatever they choose to give him out of respect and affection. (This explanation, which your director can have for nothing, has the novel advantage of a foundation in the actual words of the play, which were made up by William Shakespeare himself!)

And OK, let's suppose they are two sets of three brothers - so what? What would such symmetry add to this play besides another wrinkle for the code-and-anagram-finders and the like? (Hmm, 3 + 3 = exactly the number of points in the Star of David, the very same star that denoted German brewers, and we know Duke Senior's name is Adelbert from that thing in his first speech, so WS obviously had traveled to Bavaria, and . . . Rosicrucians and . . . Hymen = the Virgin . . . so "As You Like It" is really a prescient allegory of the Book of Mormon!) I think if such kin-based symmetry could do anything worthwhile for AYLI Shakespeare would have thought of it first and explicitly labeled Jaques as a third brother.

I too have a suggestion for the actor playing Jaques: figure out from your lines what kind of guy he is, then imagine yourself that kind of guy and make his lines your own. I also suggest your director forget about rewriting the play and concentrate on necessaries, like making sure the actors know their scansion and cutting the now-useless epilogue.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Break a leg.

Best to all.

Bob Projansky

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

 

Remembering Lynn Redgrave

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0190  Monday, 3 May 2010

From:         John F. Andrews <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         Monday, May 3, 2010 6:04 PM
Subject:      Remembering Lynn Redgrave

Lynn Redgrave, OBE

"Valiant to the end." Those were my wife's words when I told her this morning's unwelcome news about Lynn Redgrave. For other reactions to these sad tidings, see the links provided at www.redgrave.com <http://www.redgrave.com> . 

Lynn was one of the most generous people that Jan and I ever had the privilege to meet. She endured far more than her share of adversity. But rather than burdening others with it, she became proverbial for the courage with which she persevered, and for the grace with which she remained focused on her commitments and on the friends and loved ones in her life.

We'll always be grateful for the opportunity to host two programs (one at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, the other at the National Arts Club in New York) on the wrenching but inspirational photographic memoir that her daughter Annabel Clark produced about Lynn's struggle with breast cancer.  And we'll long remember the care Lynn manifested, both then and later, in her efforts to ensure that Annabel and her talented siblings flourished.

It would be difficult to identify another arts professional who could match Lynn's depth, range, and versatility. For many of her admirers it was all but impossible to believe that the same actor could be inhabiting such diverse personalities as the ones we experienced in films like Georgy Girl, Shine, and Gods and Monsters. And how touching and penetrating Lynn was as she delved into her emotional, intellectual, and artistic heritage through theater scripts such as Shakespeare For My Father (an award-winning meditation that resulted from producer Janet Griffin's request for Lynn to deliver a few remarks at the Folger Shakespeare Library on Capitol Hill), The Mandrake Root, and Nightingale.

For anyone associated with the Shakespeare Guild, it would be hard to imagine the Gielgud Award without Lynn. Not only was she one of our most exemplary recipients of this laurel, in a spring 2003 Gramercy Park ceremony that became a moving testimony to the entire Redgrave-Kempson legacy. She was deeply involved in the honor from its inception (taking part in the inaugural presentation of the Golden Quill at the Folger in 1996, when she helped us bestow the trophy on Sir Ian McKellen) to its most recent presentations (bringing eloquent, witty congratulatory messages to such recipients as Christopher Plummer in 2006, Michael Kahn in 2007, and Patrick Stewart in 2008). 

As we continue to draw sustenance from Lynn's beautiful journey, we extend heartfelt sympathy to the surviving members of her remarkable family, hoping that they will find consolation in all the warm memories they cherish from a genuinely noble spirit. 

John F. Andrews
President, The Shakespeare Guild
5B Calle San Martin
Santa Fe, NM 87506
Phone 505 988 9560   Fax 505 983 0806
www.shakesguild.org <http://www.shakesguild.org>  or
www.esuwdc.org <http://www.esuwdc.org>  

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

 

 

 

Book Announcement: GENERIC TENSION AS EXPLORATORY

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0191  Friday, 7 May 2010

From:         G. Beiner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         May 3, 2010 3:01:41 PM EDT
Subject:      Book Announcement: GENERIC TENSION AS EXPLORATORY MODE

For anyone who may be interested, _GENERIC TENSION AS EXPLORATORY MODE: Shakespeare Among Others_, a study which includes three chapters on Shakespeare's so-called 'problem plays,' has just been published (available at Amazon). The blurb, which gives an abbreviated description, is quoted below:

"Initially a project aimed at understanding Shakespeare's so-called problem plays, this study evolved into focusing more generally and comparatively on plays where the exploratory dramatic strategy involves distancing from comedy or tragedy and yet a vital relationship with the normative genre. It is a study of Shakespeare among others whose explorations are located in the territory of generic tension -- starting almost at the historical beginning of European drama with Euripides and including Ibsen, Chekhov, Kleist, Synge, and Brecht. It points to a major and distinctive current in European drama, which has given us some of the greatest and most intriguing, if at times apparently puzzling, plays from antiquity to modernity. If the book does not quite map the entire field, which is far wider and more complex than one may anticipate, it deals with a significant portion of it and opens the way for further investigation. This study outlines a poetics of generic tension based on reading plays which constitute this field, and analyzes each play in detail with the help of the poetics but without being restricted to a thesis".

Some of you may even be interested in the non-Shakespearean chapters.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

 

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