2010

Kenneth Rothwell

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0456  Thursday, 18 November 2010

[1]  From:      Nicholas Clary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:      November 18, 2010 2:39:12 PM EST
     Subj:      RE: SHK 21.0455  Kenneth Rothwell 

[2]  From:     David Frankel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:     November 18, 2010 5:15:59 PM EST
     Subj:     Re: SHK 21.0455  Kenneth Rothwell
 
[3]  From:      Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:      Tuesday, December 21, 2010            
     Subj:      Kenneth Rothwell
 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:         Nicholas Clary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         November 18, 2010 2:39:12 PM EST
Subject: 21.0455  Kenneth Rothwell
Comment:      RE: SHK 21.0455  Kenneth Rothwell

On Thursday, 18 November 2010, Charles Weinstein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>  
wrote, 

>>Ken [Rothwell] is probably best known for his work 
>>incorporating Shakespeare on film into his teaching 
>>and scholarship. At that time, many considered the 
>>using of such practices as a 'dumbing down' of 
>>Shakespeare."
>
>Some still do.

Some remain uncivil at every opportunity -- Ken Rothwell resisted such 
temptations.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:        David Frankel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:        November 18, 2010 5:15:59 PM EST
Subject: 21.0455  Kenneth Rothwell
Comment:     Re: SHK 21.0455  Kenneth Rothwell

Whatever (and whoever) he might have been, Shakespeare was a playwright, 
someone whose texts were constructed for performance. The idea that 
incorporating performance, whether on stage, on film, or in the 
classroom, is "dumbing down" Shakespeare suggests a fossilized attitude 
toward what plays are and how they actually function. The real issue, as 
in all teaching, is how the material is used by both the teacher and the 
students. 

cdf

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:         Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         Tuesday, December 21, 2010            
Subject:      Kenneth Rothwell 

I had my differences with some of Ken Rothwell's beliefs, so to maintain 
civility I simply did not bring them up and stuck instead to subjects we 
both loved: Shakespeare, Shakespeare in performance, and Shakespeare in 
performance on film.

For someone to use a tribute I was making to a scholar for whom I had 
the greatest respect, a scholar who significantly changed the way that 
most of us thought about Shakespeare in performance and changed the way 
we used performance in our classrooms, a man I loved for his kindness 
and gentleness and enthusiasm, for someone to use that tribute to make a 
snide and hurtful remark borders on the inexcusable. 

Fortunately, such a display of ignorance can in no way tarnish the 
contributions this wonderful man made to Shakespeare studies. Ken 
Rothwell will be remembered much longer than his opponent "whose frown, 
/ And wrinkled lips, and sneer of cold command" will be reduced to the 
endless sands of nothingness and the "hand that mocked them, and the 
heart that fed" will be moved only by the ceaseless winds of time and 
nothingness.

Hardy

PS: "Ozymandias" is just about the only poem of Shelley's that I care 
for:

I met a traveller from an antique land,
Who said -- "two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert ... near them, on the sand,
Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lips, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed;
And on the pedestal these words appear:
My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings,
Look on my Works ye Mighty, and despair!
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal Wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away." --


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S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
                     

Hiatus

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0457  Tuesday, 21 December 2010

From:               Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:               Tuesday, December 21, 2010       
Subject:           Hiatus     

Dear Subscribers:

My apologies; I have had some issue with my medications that has interfered with my 
ability to concentrate and edit digests.

I will be doing my best to catch up. There is a lot of good stuff waiting to be 
distributed. It is just that it will take me few days to get it all out.

Please bear with me.

Hardy M. Cook
Editor of SHAKSPER


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed 
on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility 
for them.

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