2010

Hamlet's Feminine Endings

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0328  Wednesday, 28 July 2010

[1]  From:      Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:      July 26, 2010 1:23:01 PM EDT
     Subj:      Re: SHK 21.0318  Hamlet's Feminine Endings 

[2]  From:      John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:      July 26, 2010 1:45:33 PM EDT
     Subj:      Re: SHK 21.0318  Hamlet's Feminine Endings
 
[3]  From:      Anthony Burton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:      July 26, 2010 8:51:36 PM EDT
     Subj:      Re: SHK 21.0318  Hamlet's Feminine Endings
 
[4]  From:      William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:      July 27, 2010 2:56:46 PM EDT
     Subj:      RE: SHK 21.0318  Hamlet's Feminine Endings
 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:         Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         July 26, 2010 1:23:01 PM EDT
Subject: 21.0318  Hamlet's Feminine Endings
Comment:      Re: SHK 21.0318  Hamlet's Feminine Endings

We aren't talking about today's Helsingborg,
  
Helsingborg is a small Swedish town across the strait that separates Sweden from the 
Danish Helsingor.

In any case, there are ample references to both the Rosenkrantz and Guildenstern 
families in Renaissance Denmark, as I believe a check of the SHAKSPER archives will 
confirm.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:         John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         July 26, 2010 1:45:33 PM EDT
Subject: 21.0318  Hamlet's Feminine Endings
Comment:      Re: SHK 21.0318  Hamlet's Feminine Endings

Syd Kasten wrote:

>But a question more germane to the list is what was in the author's 
>mind when he planted these two north-European named characters 
>among the almost consistently south-European named characters of 
>the main plot?

This is a question that has been answered many times -- and at least once by myself. 
The 1586 engraved portrait of the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe (intended to be the 
frontispiece for one of his books) has the shields of the 16 noble families from 
which he is descended, and these include Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. Brahe sent 
copies of the engraving as publicity to England, mentioning the English 
mathematician Sir Thomas Digges. Sir Thomas's son Leonard was a poet, and wrote one 
of the prefatory poems in the First Folio. Any guesses as to how Shakespeare came to 
hear the names?

John Briggs

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:         Anthony Burton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         July 26, 2010 8:51:36 PM EDT
Subject: 21.0318  Hamlet's Feminine Endings
Comment:      Re: SHK 21.0318  Hamlet's Feminine Endings

Syd Kasten offers his impression that Hamlet's main plot is occupied primarily by 
people of south-European names: "we are talking about an Elsinore where everyone had 
names like Claudius, Marcellus, Bernardo, Laertes etc. To me R & G's Germanic names 
stand out starkly," which put me to scrounging through the play for evidence of 
North European names. More or less central to the main plot, as I conceive it, are 
Hamlet (father and son) and Gertrude, all irreproachably northern in name. The 
ambassador Voltemand is perhaps not central, but unless we're addled by stoups of 
liquor from Yaughan's tavern we all remember poor Yorick, whose memory was so green 
in Hamlet's thoughts.  

Hamlet's nationalistic quip about the French bet against the Danish bet might 
instead initiate an interesting discussion over whether or not Shakespeare meant to 
associate the old regime and the "true" Denmark with Germanic/Norse names and 
contrast them with the usurping Claudius and his crew with the more distinctly 
foreign southern/Latin ones. No, I have not forgotten the universal confidant 
Horatio, consideration of whom would make such discussion all the more interesting.

Tony

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:         William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         July 27, 2010 2:56:46 PM EDT
Subject: 21.0318  Hamlet's Feminine Endings
Comment:      RE: SHK 21.0318  Hamlet's Feminine Endings

Syd Kasten quotes: "That being of so young days brought up with him and sith so 
neighbour'd to his youth and haviour,..." and suggests that these words: "must refer 
to their being fellow students of Hamlet's at Wittenberg and, like Horatio, 
truants." If so, they don't seem to be on speaking terms. 

Kasten further writes: "I did check the Danish yellow pages and found that there 
indeed many Rosenkrantzes but not a single Guildenstern, Gildenstern, Guldenstern 
etc." 

Let me suggest that an internet search might be more successful. It was for me.

Bill


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SBReviews on the Internet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0327  Wednesday, 28 July 2010

[1]  From:      John W Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:      July 26, 2010 2:33:23 PM EDT
     Subj:      Re: SHK 21.0315  SBReviews on the Internet 

[2]  From:      Paul Barry <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:      July 26, 2010 10:57:56 PM EDT
     Subj:      Re: SHK 21.0315  SBReviews on the Internet
 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:         John W Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         July 26, 2010 2:33:23 PM EDT
Subject: 21.0315  SBReviews on the Internet
Comment:      Re: SHK 21.0315  SBReviews on the Internet

Mari Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

>Paul Barry wrote:
>
>We don't need to search for ways of doing them differently. 
>We only need to try to do them in keeping with the 
>Playwright's intent.

Ah but now you are opening an entirely different can of wriggly grey things!

Your statement presumes that somewhere we have *the* Playwright's intent. But 
that we do not have.

Actually, no, it presumes no such thing -- only that Shakespeare, being a sane 
adult, was capable of forming an intent, and that his intent is in some measure 
discoverable and approachable. God knows we can't always do more than approach. 
Textual problems and topical allusions that have passed over the historical 
horizon are obvious barriers. So, one can imagine, are conflicts within 
Shakespeare's own mind, or between Shakespeare and his society, such as issues 
touching the Reformation in "Hamlet", "King John", "Twelfth Night", and "Henry 
VIII". But that does not mean that other matters are not clear, at least to 
anyone reasonably familiar with English society ca. 1600.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:         Paul Barry <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         July 26, 2010 10:57:56 PM EDT
Subject: 21.0315  SBReviews on the Internet
Comment:      Re: SHK 21.0315  SBReviews on the Internet

It's there if you're willing to take the time and make the effort to piece it 
out.

PAUL BARRY


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

Hermione?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0325  Wednesday, 28 July 2010

From:         Cornelius Novelli <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         July 26, 2010 11:14:57 PM EDT
Subject:      Hermione?

Like David Evett, I found the ending of the Stratford ONT production of "The 
Winter's Tale" in 1986 (?) with Goldie Semple and Colm Feore to be memorable and 
mesmerizing. And an earlier production in the late 1970s had a similar powerful 
impact at the ending with a similar sense of full reunion. Brian Bedford was 
quietly paranoid and later penitent as Leontes, and Margot Dionne a powerful 
Hermione. Martha Henry was Paulina in that production, but not I think in the 
later one.   

Neil Novelli


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

Pacino as Shylock in the Park

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0326  Wednesday, 28 July 2010

From:         Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         July 26, 2010 1:25:48 PM EDT
Subject: 21.0317  Pacino as Shylock in the Park
Comment:      Re: SHK 21.0317  Pacino as Shylock in the Park

John Drakakis writes of the possibility that Shylock and Morocco were doubled:

>We know that the Jew habitually wears a
>'gaberdine' (a loose fitting robe that could
>easily cover the change of costume that
>would be required if the actor did double as
>Morocco, but the one thing that he would have
>difficulty in changing quickly was his
>facial colour).

This theatrical difficulty appears to have been actively addressed within a couple 
of decades of the play's first performance. The apothecary John Rumler is identified 
in Ben Jonson's epilogue to The Gypsies Metamorphosed (1621) as the supplier of a 
substance that enabled a quick-change ("fetched off with water and a ball") from 
blackface to whiteface. The matter is handled in detail in Andrea R. Stevens 
"'Assisted by a barber': The court apothecary, special effects, and The Gypsies 
Metamorphosed" Theatre Notebook 61 (2007): 2-11.

Gabriel Egan


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

Two Gents at Stratford Festival

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0324  Wednesday, 28 July 2010

From:         David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         July 26, 2010 12:51:33 PM EDT
Subject: 21.0314  Two Gents at Stratford Festival
Comment:      Re: SHK 21.0314  Two Gents at Stratford Festival

Stage directions for Jonson's *Oberon* (1611) clearly envisage (two) real bears, 
white, probably the two polar bears acquired from the royal household in 1609 by 
Henslowe and Alleyn for their bear-baiting operation, and perhaps available for 
WT -- see Teresa Grant, "White Bears in Mucedorus, The Winter's Tale, and 
Oberon, the Faery Prince," Notes and Queries 48 (Sept. 2001), pp. 311-13. But a 
brown bear from the bear-baiting, or otherwise kept and trained for public show, 
would have served.

Bearly,
Dave Evett 


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.

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