Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2010 :: July ::
Pacino as Shylock in the Park
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0288  Thursday, 15 July 2010

[1]  From:      Tom Reedy <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
     Date:      July 12, 2010 6:56:56 PM EDT
     Subj:      Re: SHK 21.0281  Pacino as Shylock in the Park
 
[2]  From:      David Bishop <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
     Date:      July 12, 2010 7:42:04 PM EDT
     Subj:      Re: SHK 21.0281 Pacino as Shylock in the Park
 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:         Tom Reedy <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:         July 12, 2010 6:56:56 PM EDT
Subject: 21.0281  Pacino as Shylock in the Park
Comment:      Re: SHK 21.0281  Pacino as Shylock in the Park

>David Basch wrote:
> 
>The issue you brought up in your letter addressed to me is, I think, a 
>crucial one. It concerns the extent of the right of a director to 
>guide interpretations of a play.

As the years roll by I tend to look at Shakespeare's published plays more as the 
ore from which directors mine their play rather than holy scripture.

Tom Reedy


[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:         David Bishop <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:         July 12, 2010 7:42:04 PM EDT
Subject: 21.0281 Pacino as Shylock in the Park
Comment:      Re: SHK 21.0281 Pacino as Shylock in the Park

Many have made much of Portia's line, "Which is the merchant here and which the 
Jew?" Not many have noted that this is a crowded courtroom, in which other Jews 
may also be present, but that, in any case, the Duke responds to her question 
with, "Antonio and old Shylock, both stand forth." This at least plausibly 
suggests that they must separate themselves from the crowd to show Portia which 
individuals are the principals in the case. It's still possible to find more 
significance in Portia's line, but to go on about it without taking note of the 
line that follows it is, unfortunately, not uncommon.

Best wishes,
David Bishop


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions 
expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no 
responsibility for them.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.