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Home :: Archive :: 2010 :: July ::
SBReviews on the Internet
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0306  Friday, 23 July 2010

[1]  From:      Jim Marino <
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     Date:      July 20, 2010 4:36:40 PM EDT
     Subj:      Re: SHK 21.0297  SBReviews on the Internet
 
[2]  From:      Paul Barry <
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     Date:      July 20, 2010 11:54:35 PM EDT
     Subj:      Re: SHK 21.0297  SBReviews on the Internet
 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:         Jim Marino <
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Date:         July 20, 2010 4:36:40 PM EDT
Subject: 21.0297  SBReviews on the Internet
Comment:      Re: SHK 21.0297  SBReviews on the Internet

Regarding Paul Berry's comment below:

>Have we never come to an agreement over the infinite number of 
>interpretations of the Shakespeare plays? Surely, there is more 
>than one approach, but infinite? All theories and all concept 
>productions must be tested against not only the entirety of a 
>text, but other Elizabethan / Jacobean works as well, then, 
>finally, against the sensibilities of the age. Many tests to 
>winnow those infinite interpretations down to a workable few. 
>Then, the work can start.

To second Jemma Levy in reply to Paul:

Perhaps this is a moment where humanities scholars' lack of math training shows more 
than it should.

"Infinite possibilities" do not mean "everything" or "all possibilities." It means 
an inexhaustible number of possibilities *even within tight restrictions.* The 
viable interpretations of *Othello* can exist within narrow parameters and yet be 
endless

The series of even numbers in the universe is infinite, but three and seven aren't 
included. Moreover, there is an infinite series of numbers divisible by four, which 
remains infinite while excluding half of the even numbers, an infinite series of 
numbers divisible by 32, and so forth. There can be many, many ways to play a 
Shakespeare play badly but no still no end to the ways to play it well. 

Jim Marino

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:         Paul Barry <
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Date:         July 20, 2010 11:54:35 PM EDT
Subject: 21.0297  SBReviews on the Internet
Comment:      Re: SHK 21.0297  SBReviews on the Internet


We always do them differently when we do them with different actors in different 
environments in front of different audiences. We don't need to search for ways of 
doing them differently. We only need to try to do them in keeping with the 
Playwright's intent.

PAUL BARRY 


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