2010

The Shakespeare Standard

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0232  Thursday, 10 June 2010

From:         Jeremy Fiebig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         Tuesday, Jun 1, 2010 at 3:44 PM
Subject:      The Shakespeare Standard | New Features, Call for Editors

The Shakespeare Standard (http://theshakespearestandard.com) introduces several new features, including

The Shakespeare Wave: The Shakespeare Standard is host to the first (known) Shakespeare-centered Wave (http://theshakespearestandard.com/wave/). Google Wave (http://wave.google.com/about.html) is a real-time communication/document application that has been used to host electronic conferences, academic course work, and other real-time events. The Wave can be used to share documents, host discussions, conduct informal polls, share photos and videos, and a variety of other extensions. A Google account with Wave is required. This really is a phenomenal tool and worth a few minutes of your time. Incidentally, we're also interested in adding other related waves, so please feel free to suggest your own.

The Production Hub and Event Calendar (http://theshakespearestandard/production-hub/): The Shakespeare Standard hosts an online event calendar for all manner of Shakespeare-related events, including conferences, productions, lectures, etc. Users can schedule events themselves; events are broadcast site-wide so that all readers will encounter the events regardless of the page they're on.

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The Shakespeare Standard (http://theshakespearestandard.com) seeks volunteer editorial staff in the following areas:

-Performance (Assistant/Associate Editors): review development, feature development, archiving, "Common Players" feature

-Images (Assistant/Associate/Full Editors): production photo development, rights, etc.

-Voices (Assistant/Associate/Full Editors): editorial content, podcasting, community interaction, discussion generation, polls, etc.

-Publications (Assistant/Associate/Full Editors): books and journals

-Special Projects (Assistant/Associate/Full Editors): special projects to be determined; special projects may be submitted by applicant(s)

Editors will be responsible for developing and publishing area-related content for TSS in accordance with our editorial policies, including posting news items in their designated areas, and for generating original content for the site at the rate of 2-3 items per month.

To apply for one of these volunteer positions, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and include brief cover matter, a short biography, and a recent resume/CV.

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More features, including what we hope to be our first edition of an early modern resource, are slated for the next few weeks.

Sincerely,
The Editors of The Shakespeare Standard
theshakespearestandard.com
facebook.com/TheShakespeareStandard
twitter.com/shakesstandard

Jeremy Fiebig
http://web.me.com/foolsby/Jeremy_Fiebig/Jeremy.html
http://twitter.com/foolsby

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

 

Hammond Edition of Double Falsehood

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0233  Thursday, 10 June 2010

[1]  From:      Ron Rosenbaum <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:      June 8, 2010 3:59:45 AM EDT
     Subj:      Re: SHK 21.0221 Hammond Edition of Double Falsehood

[2]  From:      Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:      Thursday, June 10, 2010             
     Subj:      Hammond Edition of Double Falsehood

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:         Ron Rosenbaum <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         June 8, 2010 3:59:45 AM EDT
Subject: 21.0221 Hammond Edition of Double Falsehood
Comment:      Re: SHK 21.0221 Hammond Edition of Double Falsehood 

Unfortunately Clark J. Holloway misses the point I was making in my <Slate> essay <http://www.slate.com/id/2161049/landing/1> on the problem with the new Arden 3 edition of <Double Falsehood>, edited by Brean Hammond. 

The point was not whether or not the "Shakespearean" elements of <Double Falsehood> Mr. Holloway seems to hear in Lewis Theobald's 18th century concoction can be found in the first or second half of the play, but whether there are enough elements <anywhere> to justify Arden's decision to publish the woeful pastiche under the banner of "The Arden Shakespeare", thus misleading potential buyers and readers.

I refer Mr. Holloway and list members to Macdonald P. Jackson's review of the Hammond-edited volume in the May 21 issue of the <Times Literary Supplement>. 

No one can doubt Macdonald P. Jackson is an exceptionally scrupulous Shakespearean scholar. Nor can one doubt him when, in his review, Jackson tells us the reader hoping for "scenes of pure Shakespeare is doomed to disappointment", that at most there are "vestiges of his handiwork", "muffled echoes" in "a few scraps of verse". This of course includes the first two acts which seem to have so impressed Mr. Holloway. 

 Any alleged "Shakespearean" elements can be explained by Lewis Theobald's attempt to mimic his better.

As a marketing ploy, as a "brand extension", an attempt to "monetize" aubprime "Shakespearean" goods, Arden's decision is too clever by half and will inevitably diminish the reputation of the publisher and alas, perhaps Shakespeare as well, for all those who are taken in by its inclusion in the Arden edition.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:         Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         Thursday, June 10, 2010             
Subject:      Hammond Edition of Double Falsehood 

I had been planning on included an abstract of Mac Jackson's Review of the Hammond Double Falsehood even before Ron Rosenbaum mentioned it. So here it is.

Thought-executing fires
By Macdonald P. Jackson
Review of Brean Hammond, editor, DOUBLE FALSEHOOD OR THE DISTRESSED LOVERS [443 pp., Arden Shakespeare.]

TLS MAY 21 2010

In 1726 the minor poet, playwright, librettist and man of letters Lewis Theobald published Shakespeare Restored, a work that earned him the enmity of Alexander Pope, whose inadequacies as an editor of Shakespeare the book exposed. "Piddling Tibbald', as Pope called him, became chief dunce of the Dunciad. But his understanding of the principles of textual editing and of Shakespeare's modes of thought and expression far exceeded Pope's. It is to his acumen that we owe such brilliant emendations as "and a' babbled of green fields", where the Hostess, describing the dying Falstaff s death, had said in the First Folio of 1623 that "his Nose was as sharp as a Pen, and a Table of greene fields". Theobald's insights recovered scores of Shakespearean readings corrupted in the early printed texts. His next major enterprise, however, may have obliterated more of Shakespeare's writing than it preserved. In 1727 he presented at the Theatre Royal in Drury Lane Double Falshood; or, The Distrest Lovers, publishing it in two issues the following year and claiming that it was originally by Shakespeare, whose work he had "revised and adapted" for the stage. Pope and his allies ridiculed these claims, hinting that the play was entirely Theobald's creation. Debate over Theobald's honesty in the matter has persisted ever since.

Certain facts suggest that he was telling what he believed, at least at first, to be the truth. . . .

Whether Double Falsehood is based on Cardenio or not, its ultimate source is also "The History of Cardenio" in Don Quixote, and in Shelton's translation, which was reprinted in 1725. Theobald appears to have consulted the reprint. He reported that a tradition assigned composition of the supposed Shakespearean original to the latter years of Shakespeare's career - "the Time of his Retirement from the Stage". . . . 

If they were not fictional mouthpieces for Theobald's own secret doubts, the others were perceptive. Modern commentators have recognized the strikingly Fletcherian style of much of the verse in Double Falsehood from Act Three, scene two onwards. . . . 

[ . . . ]

Was Shakespeare a co-author of Cardenio? and, if so, has any of his writing survived? into Double Falsehood? . . .  Anybody? approaching Double Falsehood in the hope? of reading scenes of pure Shakespeare is? doomed to disappointment. But the play has merit, despite incoherences that seem more compatible with the abbreviation and reorganization of a Jacobean original than with free? composition. . . . The ingredients are familiar from Shakespeare's late romances and Fletcher's tragicomedies, though the emotional amplitude of the endings of Pericles and The Winter's Tale is lacking. 

Brean Hammond's lively introduction to his Arden edition of the play offers a thorough and judicious account of the relevant scholarship. His cautious conclusion is that Shakespeare had indeed collaborated with Fletcher on Cardenio and that vestiges of his handiwork remain in Double Falsehood. . . . 

[ . . . ]

Hammond's copious commentary draws attention to words and phrases found in Shakespeare and Fletcher's period but not in Theobald's, and vice versa. . . .

[ . . . ]

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

 

Sir John Gielgud

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0235  Thursday, 10 June 2010

From:         Harry Rusche <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         June 8, 2010 6:00:11 PM EDT
Subject:      Sir John Gielgud

Since we are telling war stories, let me describe my own brush with fame. Years ago John Lehmann and I were friends and he invited me to the Garrick Club for lunch. When we walked in I saw a gentleman at one of the tables and, in my southern American way, greeted him: "Hey, how are you?" He replied, "I am fine, young man." When I sat down with Lehmann I realized it was Sir John Gielgud; I had seen him so often in films, on stage, etc., I thought I knew him personally. John L. took me over to meet him, and that, my friends, was one of the memorable moments in that particular visit to the U.K. One funny anecdote: after lunch John L. went to the desk and complained and argued about the bill and what seemed like a mistaken charge for "broad beans." I was embarrassed (again, my American upbringing), but John said that arguing about the bill was almost to be expected--perhaps even traditional--when one lunched at the Garrick!

Harry Rusche

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

 

Hamlet's Feminine Endings

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0234  Thursday, 10 June 2010

From:         William Sutton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         June 8, 2010 5:02:21 AM EDT
Subject: 21.0226  Hamlet's Feminine Endings
Comment:      Re: SHK 21.0226  Hamlet's Feminine Endings

You are not wrong about sonnet 87: though the -ing endings ring in the final couplet with a King (aching)? and waking, though their rimes are er's.

And sonnet 26 has 6 including a feminine final couplet. 28 has 4 including fc. neither is specifically gender oriented. Other fem couplets are 33 + 111.

Sonnet 3 on the other hand the entire first quatrain is fem lines. may have st to do with his mother.

Sonnet 11 has 4 and mistress nature may have some hand in this.

Maybe the fresh numbers in sonnet 17 influence the number of fem lines of which there are 2. 

Interesting are the sonnets dealing with the triangle affair 40-43. Sonnet 40 has 4 fem endings in 2nd quatrain. You could force 2 into the 2nd quatrain of 41 by voicing the -ed endings. 42 is clearly referring to her and her doings in the 2nd quatrain and has 6 fem endings. And the -ed endings in 1st quatrain of 43 must be stressed making 2 fem endings.

Sonnet 88 has 4 fem endings but then it talks of weakness, the very thing a fem ending does.

Granted there are plenty of pairs of fem rime words scattered through the series which do not point to gender. (leisure pleasure broken open spirit merit smother other etc. 113 has 2. 114 has 4. 115 2. 116 2. Does this have significance? were they done around the same time? They do tie together in argument. though 116 gets all the attention.

118 2nd quatrain is all fem. 119 has 6 spread over 2 quatrains. 120 has 4. and even an embedded double one in lines 11 + 12. 

And soon to you, as you to me then tend'red (fem ending)
The humble salve,(fem ending from as to salve) which wounded bosoms fits!

121 has 4.

124 has 2. does unfather'd count as gender pointing?
125 has 2 and in 126 Nature again gets her own riming fem couplet!

The Mistress sonnets have 2 fem endings and because of the subject matter gender implications in 131, 132 and 133. The spacious joke of line 5 in 135 is feminine.

141 142 and 144 all contain a pair of fem endings. the latter being a female evil. then skip to 151's treason and reason. and finally 6 fem endings in sonnet 152. in which the thee he accuses is a she. Or not if we don't carry the narrative through and accept them as individual poems.

So is there an argument to be made for accepting gender into the use of feminine lines?

Funnily enough sonnet 150, if you accept the original punctuation as the closest to authorial, makes it the only truly end-stopped masculine line sonnet with an intact structure of 4, 4, 4, 2, in the entire series. Every other sonnet has it's verse structure interfered with in some manner. But then again maybe that was the point of these sonnets in the first place.

Yours,
Will

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

 

Shakespeare and the Italian Renaissance Seminar

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 21.0236  Friday, 12 June 2010

From:         Michele Marrapodi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         June 12, 2010 10:57:59 AM EDT
Subject:      Reminder of the Shakespeare and the Italian Renaissance Seminar - World Shakespeare Congress

Ninth World Shakespeare Congress:
Renaissance Shakespeare / Shakespeare Renaissances
Prague, Czech Republic - 17-22 July 2011

Call for papers - Seminar No. 3.
Shakespeare and the Italian Renaissance:
Appropriation, Transformation, Opposition. 

Leaders:
Michele Marrapodi (University of Palermo, Italy), Robert Henke (Washington University, USA).

This seminar aims to place Shakespeare's works within the context of the European Renaissance and, more specifically, within the context of Italian cultural, dramatic, and literary traditions, with reference to the impact and influence of both classical and contemporary culture. The topics may range from a reassessment of Italian novellas, theatre, and discourses as direct or indirect sources, analogues, paralogues, and intertexts for the construction of Shakespeare's poetry and drama to a reconsideration of other cultural transactions, such as travel and courtesy books, the arts, fencing, dancing, fashion, and so forth. 

The critical perspective of the seminar is to regard the pervasive presence of the Italian world in early modern England not only as a traditional treasure trove of influence and imitation but also as a potential cultural force of ideological appropriation, transformation, and opposition.

(Deadline for proposals of papers just extended until 30th September 2010)

Best wishes,
Michele Marrapodi
University of Palermo
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

 

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