2011

Hiatus: Newly Designed Web Site

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0058   Wednesday, 23 February 2011

From:         Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         Wednesday, February 23, 2011      
Subject:      Hiatus: Newly Designed Web Site

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

Well, this will be the last posting from the present set-up for SHAKSPER. Currently, I use L-Soft's 
Listserv software, for which I pay a $700 a year licensing fee, to distribute SHAKSPER digests to the 
1,062 members of this list. The listserv software resides on a server that sits next to the desk in my 
home office where the current SHAKSPER web site resides at the static IP address 12.101.12.90. After the 
change, the new web site will be on another server with another static IP address but will still have the 
same Internet name: www.shaksper.net. As I said in my first message today, SHAKSPER will remain as an e-
mail distribution list; however, instead of being a listserv list it will be a list run from Joomla apps 
built into the design of the new web site. 

I will need to learn how to use these apps and to adapt them to my style and the look-and-feel of the 
digests as they have been over the years to the Joomla tools. The biggest difference involves the new 
design, which will give me greater control and flexibility than the current one. I will be able to have 
control over all of the content on the site. So after I send out one of the SBReviews, for example, I 
will be able to mount a pdf version of that review directly to the web site. There are many other 
features that the new site will have, but on the whole what you will be as subscribers will see is a 
cleaner, more modern-looking site with easier to use features. The archive of the list's twenty-two of 
service will still be available and will remain the important scholarly resource it is.

We owe thanks for this newly designed site to Ron Severdia. Ron has many talents: he is an actor 
<http://rontheactor.com>, the founder of PlayShakespeare.com <http://www.playshakespeare.com/news/3636-
founder-ron-severdia-talks-about-playshakespeare-on-cnn>, the creator of the very best Shakespeare 
iPhone/iPod/iPad app, the co-author of the O'Reilly publication _Using Joomla: Building Powerful and 
Efficient Web Sites_, the accomplished, award-winning web designer, and the creative director of the web 
design company Kontent Design: <http://kontentdesign.com/our-team/ron>.

Eric Luhrs has earned every SHAKSPEReans thanks for designing SHAKSPER's first web presence 
<www.shaksper.net> and for his unflagging technical assistance to all things SHAKSPEReans for many, many 
years. Eric will be assisting in the migration from the old site and software to the new one. 

I ask all subscribers to stop sending or replying to messages using the old addresses until the transfer 
is up and running. In the meantime, you may send me messages at my personal e-mail address 
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The change should take around two weeks, maybe even less; however, I will have a 
great deal to learn so bear with me.

My thanks to my colleague of many years, Eric Luhrs, whose contributions behind the scenes are 
innumerable. Also, my thanks to my new colleague Ron Severdia, who will be making this new Joomla site 
possible. SHAKSPER could not have a better designer than Ron. Ron has been after me for years to update 
the way I do things, and it has only been my stubbornness and fears that have held me back. But thank 
goodness Ron and his generosity have prevailed. 

I look forward to the newly designed site and all of the riches it will provide SHAKSPEReans. 

Finally, I must offer my thanks to Ken Steele. Ken Steele was a graduate student at the University of 
Toronto when he came up with the idea of a listserv modeled after HUMANIST that was dedicated to 
discussions of Shakespeare. I was a founding member of SHAKSPER and first assisted Ken and then took over 
from him. But my sincerest thanks to Ken for the idea, which eventually provided me the niche in 
Shakespeare studies that has changed my life and that was so well-suited to my personality.

On a personal note, SHAKSPER has opened many doors for me, made it possible for me to meet and to develop 
professional friendships with scholars whom I had admired from afar.

SHAKPSER has been my love and my joy for some twenty years, and I close this chapter of its history with 
an acknowledgement of my appreciation to all who have been its members over the years and whose 
discussions have enriched my personal and professional life.

Thank you all.

Best wishes,
Hardy


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole 
property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Collier, MND, and The Oxford Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0057   Wednesday, 23 February 2011

[1]  From:      Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:      Thursday, January 27, 2011 11:56:49 PM ET
     Subj:      Re: SHK 22.0024 Collier, MND, and The Oxford Shakespeare 

[2]  From:      Jeffrey Kahan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
     Date:      Friday, January 28, 2011 12:39:40 AM ET
     Subj:      RE: SHK 22.0024 Collier, MND, and The Oxford Shakespeare 


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:         Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         Thursday, January 27, 2011 11:56:49 PM ET
Subject: 22.0024 Collier, MND, and The Oxford Shakespeare
Comment:      Re: SHK 22.0024 Collier, MND, and The Oxford Shakespeare

>Can anyone offer a compelling argument for The Oxford Shakespeare's decision to 
>emend Bottom's speech in 1.2, where he promises to "move stones" (Oxford 
>Shakespeare 1.2.24) rather than to "move storms" as he does in Q1 (1600), Q2 (1619), 
>and F (1623)?
>
>That the editors made the change without any clear textual warrant for doing so 
>is somewhat baffling, but it is even more puzzling when one considers that the 
>basis for the emendation appears to be Collier's forged MS annotations to the 
>Second Folio.
>
>Don't we risk confusing students and readers of Shakespeare by giving editorial 
>sanction to a "correction" produced by a forger?

Taylor says he was influenced by Antony's speech at JC,III.ii.226-30 (Riv.) about rhetorical skill that 
"should move / The stones of Rome to rise and mutiny."  However, while the difference between "storms" 
and "stones" is, as Taylor says, "an easy minim" difference, I also am not convinced that "stones" is 
correct.  It may be that Collier, like Taylor, was also influenced by the external analogy in JC. Without 
better textual support, or at least the need to correct a patently absurd text, I would not make the 
change. This is especially so as the sense of the QF reading is better as "storms" -- Bottom is saying 
that his histrionics will produce storms of tears in the audience's eyes.

As an aside, Collier was much more than an adept forger, and it would be a mistake to dismiss all his 
scholarship because of his hobby. There is no reason to suspect that his tendency to make mischief caused 
him to make deliberately false emendations when he spoke in his own name.


[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:         Jeffrey Kahan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         Friday, January 28, 2011 12:39:40 AM ET
Subject: 22.0024 Collier, MND, and The Oxford Shakespeare
Comment:      RE: SHK 22.0024 Collier, MND, and The Oxford Shakespeare

Before his forging of the Perkins (1852), Collier had a long and distinguished career, one that is not 
totally overshadowed by forgery. John Payne Collier did more than any early scholar with the exception of 
Edmond Malone to promote archival scholarship. He discovered countless documents, including Simon 
Foreman's visit to the Globe Theatre, attributed Tamburlaine to Marlowe, and transcribed Coleridge's 
lectures for posterity. His key contributions seem to have been generated by genuine scholarship, though 
as Arthur Freeman and Janet Ing Freeman have pointed out, his scholarship on Marlowe does sometimes 
touch, if not cross, the line.  In other instances, his  so- called forgeries might have  been honest 
errors. The Freemans point out that his transcription of Henslowe diary's "mr maxton" was a mistake for 
"mr marstone" (211-12).  And, as I have argued, is it just possible that some of Collier's forgeries were 
actually perpetrated by Steevens, characterised by Gifford as "the Puck of Commentators!"

Jeffrey Kahan (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)



_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole 
property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Corpsing?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0055   Wednesday, 23 February 2011

From:         Matthew Steggle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         Thursday, February 3, 2011 4:49:23 AM ET
Subject:      Corpsing?

>Does anyone know of any references in early modern drama or associated materials to  
>the phenomenon now known as "corpsing" where an actor becomes seized by laughter in 
>the middle of a performance?

Tom Bishop might want to look at my book, _Laughing and Weeping in Early Modern Theatres_ (Ashgate, 
2007), which hoovers up early modern references to laughing on stage: how it was done, how it was notated 
in surviving scripts. Also in there (in Chapter 7) are various early modern accounts of mishaps on stage-
actors forgetting their lines, etc -- that provoke unintended audience laughter. None of them (I can 
think of) refers to actors _laughing_ uncontrollably. About the nearest you get is this typically unfunny 
jest-book joke:

[A] Master of Art in one of the Vniuersities, hauing acted in a Tragedy, and his body lying seeming dead 
on the Stage, for the time, was not yet come that hee should be taken away, a passion took him that he 
was forced to cough so loud that it was perceived by the generall auditory, at which many of them falling 
into a laughter, hee rising vp excused it thus: you may see Gentlemen what it is to drinke in ones 
porridge, for they shall cough in their graue.

[attr. Archie Armstrong], A Baquet of Jeasts. Or Change of Cheare. Being a Collection of Moderne Jests. 
Witty Jeeres. Pleasant Taunts. Merry Tales (London: Richard Royston, 1630), 103.

Matt


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole 
property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Lean & Hungry Theater: Romeo and Juliet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0056   Wednesday, 23 February 2011

From:         Julia Griffin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         Wednesday, February 2, 2011 6:37:37 PM ET 
Subject:      Lean & Hungry Theater: Romeo and Juliet 

Another modern *Romeo*!  And why not?

Still, I've been thinking of something counter-revolutionary . . .

*R&J* relocated to Mesopotamia, some time around 2800 BC. Juliet's family serves the goddess Ishtar; 
Romeo's, however, is devoted to the cult of Shamash, and despises the Ishtarians. They meet on a night of 
cultic celebration (lots to imagine there!)

Tybalt is probably a monster, of dreadful form. The Prince is probably a god.

Julia Griffin


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole 
property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Arden3 "The Merchant of Venice"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0054   Wednesday, 23 February 2011

From:         John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:         February 18, 2011 2:50:31 PM EST
Subject:      Arden3 "The Merchant of Venice"

John Drakakis' Arden3 edition of "The Merchant of Venice" has been published [exactly when is a bit of a 
mystery: the book is dated 2010, but it seem to have been released -- or escaped -- this month.]

It has some odd features, whereas others take existing Arden3 trends further. The 159-page discursive 
(some would say rambling) introduction seems totally unstructured, and just doesn't cover some topics 
that one would expect -- I can find no discussion of the date of composition, for example. The annotation 
is satisfactorily ample -- so much so, that "Longer Notes" have had to be banished to a separate section 
(presumably because they wouldn't fit on the page.)

Somewhat surprisingly (and against current trends, Keir Elam's "Twelfth Night", for example), Shylock and 
Lancelot Gobbo have become "Jew" and "Clown" in the speech prefixes (there is a complicated -- and not 
particularly relevant - argument regarding shortage of type in printing Q1). Even more striking, the 
clown has become "Lancelet Giobbe" -- the original text alternates "Iobbe" and "Gobbo", apparently 
representing two different stabs (and misses) at the Italian for "Job". But I thought the Arden3 "The 
Taming of the Shrew" eschewed "Petruccio" in favour of "Petruchio"?

Appendix 1 has a somewhat confusing doubling chart -- which looks remarkably similar to the chart of type 
shortages in Appendix 2. Appendix 3 does actually discuss the text of Q1, for which I suppose we should 
be grateful.

On page 112, Drakakis sensibly concludes that Richard Burbage took the role of Antonio -- but on page 403 
he assigns it to James Burbage!

There is much puzzling over who might have originally taken the role of Shylock, and here I would like to 
make a suggestion -- as a quasi-comic role (but not a clown's one), I would suggest that it was played by 
Shakespeare himself.

John Briggs


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the opinions expressed on it are the sole 
property of the poster, and the editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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