2011

Inquiry

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0296  Thursday, 10 November 2011

 

From:         Corey Rose <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         November 9, 2011 5:14:17 PM EST

Subject:      Inquiry

 

Wanted: a Shakespearean scholar, PhD level, of any critical background or orientation, to sit on a doctoral committee.

 

I am an English major who has pursued graduate degrees in Education and who is now enrolled in a PhD program in adult learning theory. Currently in the exploratory stages of a dissertation on the effect of Shakespeare’s texts on the adult learner, I am interested in whether close encounters with the text (in the form of studying, acting, teaching, directing) may lead to change (serious ontological or epistemological change in the form of perspective transformations) in the learner. My research is grounded in adult learning and development theories (Mezirow, Perry, Kegan, Brookfield, Belenky, to name a few) but holds in the spirit of its purview that Shakespeare’s texts have power to alter one’s perspective.

 

The essential question is this: Are Shakespeare’s texts powerful enough to create real change in the adult learner?

 

Of course, this is contrary to what literary criticism does, and I wish to emphasize that I am not participating in Shakespeare studies but rather in the social sciences. Still, I want one member of my dissertation committee to be a Shakespeare scholar.  Your role will involve being open minded, while offering doubt, insight, and a critical perspective.

 

Commitment will require a twice per semester conference call over three years and an eventual review and approval or rejection of my dissertation. Your compensation will be contribution to learning, professional courtesy, intellectual curiosity, and a nominal stipend of 100 dollars (at a rate of $33.33 per year, donating cells to scientific research is more profitable, so don’t do it for the money). Thanks for your time.

 

Please direct any questions to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Thank you,

Corey Rose

 

Call for Papers

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0295  Thursday, 10 November 2011

 

From:         Michele Marrapodi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         November 10, 2011 4:18:51 AM EST

Subject:      Call for Papers

 

Call for Papers for the collection of essays: 

 

Shakespeare and the Italian Renaissance: Appropriation, Transformation, Opposition 

 

Edited by 

Michele Marrapodi 

 

This new collection of essays aims to place the works of Shakespeare within the context of the European Renaissance and, more specifically, within the context of Italian cultural, dramatic, and literary traditions, with reference to the impact and influence of both classical and contemporary culture. In contrast with previous studies, often characterized by a positivistic-deterministic hermeneutics and, consequently, by a largely passive analysis of source material or literary topoi, the new critical perspective pursued in this volume will take into account a wider European intertextual dimension and, above all, an ideological interpretation of the ‘aesthetics’ or ‘politics’ of intertextuality which will allow the analysis of the presence of the Italian world in early modern England not as a traditional treasure trove of influence and imitation but as a potential cultural force, generating complex processes of appropriation, transformation, and ideological opposition throughout a continuous dialectical interchange of compliance and subversion. 

 

Please send a 200-word abstract of the proposed chapter directly to the editor before 29 February 2012. 

 

Prof. Michele Marrapodi

Dipt. (FIERI-AGLAIA) Filosofia, Filologia, Storia, Arti, Critica dei Saperi

Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia

Viale delle Scienze

90128 Palermo, Italy

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Early Modern Theatricality in the 21st Century

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0293  Wednesday, 9 November 2011

 

From:         Erika T Lin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         November 8, 2011 9:57:28 PM EST

Subject:      Early Modern Theatricality in the 21st Century

 

Colleagues,

 

The conference below may be of interest to some list members. Please feel free to circulate the announcement and poster. There is no registration fee, but the reception and dinner requires an RSVP by November 15.

 

Best,

Erika T. Lin

Assistant Professor

Department of English

George Mason University

4400 University Dr., MSN 3E4

Fairfax, VA 22030

 

==========

 

Early Modern Theatricality in the 21st Century

A Conference at Rutgers University

Thursday, December 1 and Friday, December 2, 2011

 

Early Modern Theatricality in the 21st Century brings twenty-five leading scholars to Rutgers for a summit on the state of the field, inviting them to test out new methods for capturing the full event of theatre and its immense imaginative resources. Panelists will examine the clusters of techniques, objects, bodies, conventions, signs, and other significant elements that characterized early modern  performance and that extended beyond the public theaters to public entertainments and spectacles of all types, from the Tudor period to the Restoration. Organized in plenary roundtable format with generous time for collective discussion, the conference will present an exploded view of theatricality across a broad period, isolating functional parts, magnifying them for analysis, and integrating them into rigorous, conceptually adventurous statements that aim to provoke a re-discovery of early modern drama in all its formal complexity and wild profusion.

 

Attendance is free and open to the public.

 

Sponsored by the Rutgers British Studies Center, the Program in Early Modern Studies, and the Center for Cultural Analysis.

 

For more information, see http://earlymoderntheatricality.com

 
Early Modern Theatricality in the 21st Century Poster:  pdf  Theatricality21stPoster

Anonymous

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0294  Wednesday, 9 November 2011

 

[1] From:         Eric Johnson-DeBaufre <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         November 8, 2011 1:58:05 PM EST

     Subject:      Re: SHAKSPER: Anon

 

[2] From:         Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

     Date:         November 8, 2011 4:44:28 PM EST

     Subject:      Re: SHAKSPER: Anon

 

 

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------

From:         Eric Johnson-DeBaufre <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         November 8, 2011 1:58:05 PM EST

Subject:      Re: SHAKSPER: Anon

 

I have no dog in this race, but the paleographer in me felt the need to respond to Duncan Salkeld's response to M Egan (see below) 

 

>Duncan Salkeld wrote:

>Just for the sake of verity, regarding apples:

>>M Egan wrote: ‘There’s just no evidence for the claim that 

>>the word apparel below should be contracted in to two 

>>syllables, as Mac Jackson asserts’.

>> 

>>Here’s some (from Bridewell): ‘Jane Trosse being taken in 

>>unsemely appell more manlyke than woman like and folowed 

>>from taverne to Taverne was brought into this house the ixth 

>>of Marche 1576’.

>>

>>‘Ellis the glovers apprentices -- To each of them the like appell’ 

>>(30 March 1605).

 

Unfortunately, this "evidence" from Bridewell is probably evidence of nothing other than poor transcription habits. I would bet good money that the second medial p in "unsemely appell" and "like appell" is a p brevigraph (i.e. not a p, but a special form of the p character that scribes used to indicate that other letters are to be supplied, in this case -ar). The transcriber probably overlooked this (probably because the character simply looked like a slightly fancier p) and now, since we don't use brevigraphs (well, I do, but that's because I work with 16th c. manuscripts a lot!), it leads people to believe that apparel was pronounced "appell." Sorry, but you'll need better evidence than that if you want to make that argument. This is, as I said, simply a transcription error.

 

Eric Johnson-DeBaufre

 

NB: Attached are examples of several versions of the p character in Secretary hand as well as a p brevigraph (used for par/per/por). These brevigraphs were preserved from medieval latin abbreviation conventions (which had separate brevigraphs: one for par/per/por, one for pro-, and another for pre-)—16th century scribes often used these different graphs erratically (i.e. using the pro- graph for par/per/por, etc.).

 

Secretary p: image Secretary p

 

par_per_por_ brevigraph: image par_per_por_ brevigraph

 

[2]------------------------------------------------------------

From:         Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         November 8, 2011 4:44:28 PM EST

Subject:      Re: SHAKSPER: Anon

 

Michael Egan says that he is willing to discuss my data with anyone but since it is so voluminous and detailed it’s only worth doing so after they’ve reviewed it.

 

I have read Egan's book, as well as his articles in response to Mac Jackson (and other things as well), and I authored a lengthy opinion analyzing his contentions in detail.  Other than asserting, without explanation or support, that it was a "hatchet job" and promising to produce a point-by-point refutation (which has not been forthcoming), Egan has avoided discussing it.

 

New to Papers for Comments

 

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 22.0292  Wednesday, 9 November 2011

 

From:         Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         Wednesday, November 9, 2011

Subject:      New to Papers for Comments

 

As a service to its members, SHAKSPER makes selected papers for which the author would like comments available for a short time on the SHAKSPER server at the Scholarly Papers for Comments section: http://shaksper.net/scholarly-resources/scholarly-papers-for-comments

 

The following play has just been uploaded to the Scholarly Papers for Comments section of the web site: The Alchemist’s Tragedy by Jay Alan Quantrill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.

 

Jay Alan Quantrill has supplied this Abstract.

 

ABSTRACT: William Shakespeare is the central figure of this play.  Obviously, (with some much needed humility) my conception of him. And of course, my conception of him only at a particular time in his life.  To call this moment a mid-life crises would be to equate Will with a used car salesman of our day, or a clerk at the Inns of Court in his.  That’s not how I see him. 

 

But it is a crisis, however far beyond his mid-life he is at 43. A crisis of art and faith: his art because he’d begun to lose faith in his subject – mankind.  Faith in god?  He’s long past that. Though he dare not admit such treason to a breathing soul. But faith in the worthiness or goodness of man, or any reason to hope for improvement? None. And that’s a tragedy, at least it was for my appreciation of Shakespeare in 1609.

 

Will comes into the Globe Theatre even on cold mid-winter mornings with his anxiety stained on his fingertips – uneasy and under pressure, within and without.  He’s been jumping through theatrical hoops since he was twelve years old. He’s discontent with the hoops he’s designed recently, not sure he has another hoop on the horizon.

 

So here he comes, discontent, looking for hope or a worthy tale to tell, or trouble, any trouble, any thing to ignite his increasingly “sonnetted heart.” 

 

You should your comments directly to the author Jay Alan Quantrill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>; or if you wish, you may start a thread through the normal SHAKSPER channels by sending it to the list at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

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